Fort Campbell

Fort Campbell

Dozens of Fort Campbell soldiers are returning to the post along the Kentucky-Tennessee border this week from deployment to Afghanistan.

The military says about 160 soldiers from 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division are expected to arrive Friday morning.

The soldiers have been in Afghanistan advising and assisting the Afghan National Army.

The 1st Brigade is known as "Bastogne", a name commemorating the brigade's defense of the town of Bastogne, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II.

Fort Campbell

Army officials are seeking public comment on possible personnel reductions at Fort Campbell.

    A community listening session is set for Jan. 20 at Fort Campbell's Family Resource Center.

   Clarksville, Tennessee, officials are urging area residents to attend and show support for the Army post straddling the Kentucky-Tennessee line. The session will allow residents to voice their opinions to Department of the Army officials about the potential personnel reduction and its possible impact.

Service Set at Fort Campbell on Gander Anniversary

Dec 8, 2014
U.S. Army

Nearly 29 years ago, 248 soldiers from Fort Campbell's 101st Airborne Division died when their plane crashed as they were returning home from a peacekeeping mission in Sinai, Egypt.

Members of the soldiers' unit will again hold a memorial service for the soldiers this week.

The ceremony is set for 10:30 a.m. CST Friday at the Gander Memorial on Screaming Eagles Boulevard at the post. It is being held by the 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team.

The flight crashed at Gander International Airport in Newfoundland on Dec. 12, 1985, also killing eight crew members.

Families of Fallen Soldiers Get New Home

Nov 24, 2014
Fort Campbell

The oldest surviving structure on the Fort Campbell Army post is now being used to help a different kind of survivor: family members of fallen soldiers.

   Fort Campbell dedicated the Parrish House as the Survivor Outreach Services building as part of Military Survivor Appreciation Week.

   The structure was built in 1833 and is a plantation-style farmhouse that has been home to all commanding generals of the 101st Airborne Division since 1947.

Hagel Updates U.S. Ebola Mission at Fort Campbell

Nov 17, 2014
US Dept. of Defense

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says there are encouraging signs of progress against the Ebola virus in West Africa, and he says the U.S. military can take some credit for containing it.

Hagel told a group of 101st Airborne Division soldiers Monday that it is too early to say when the U.S. military's Ebola mission in Liberia and Senegal will be finished.

 He said, "We're not at the end yet."

 Hagel toured the pre-deployment training that is given to soldiers before they go to West Africa. The soldiers are providing logistics and other support there but are not in direct contact with people infected with the virus. Nevertheless, soldiers are required to undergo 21 days of quarantine upon their return.

Health Official Wants Fort Campbell to Work With the State

Oct 30, 2014
Fort Campbell

Tennessee's top health department official is recommending that Fort Campbell use the state lab facility for testing for specific diseases, including Ebola.

Dr. John Dreyzehner, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Health, told a round table discussion at the military post that the state lab is close to Fort Campbell and could provide assistance.

Some Fort Campbell troops recently deployed, as the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) assumed a role as the Headquarters Unit for the military mission in Liberia. The troops joined soldiers from all five services who are providing engineering, health care training and logistical support to USAID, the armed forces of Liberia and the government of Liberia.

The round table was held between military and civilian health administrators at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital at Fort Campbell.

A partnership between the local utility and state and federal government will build Kentucky’s largest solar array at Fort Campbell. The solar array will cover about 20 acres at the army base, and will produce five megawatts of power.

Kenya Stump, Kentucky’s assistant director of the Division of Renewable Energy, said five megawatts is enough energy to power about 500 homes.

The array will sit on an abandoned landfill, Stump said.

“The landfill itself wasn’t in a position to be utilized since it was already capped and just sitting there, so they had space,” Stump said. “So the array actually fits perfectly with the abandoned landfill.”

She said it’s only one example of using brownfields sites to spur renewable energy development, which is an initiative the Environmental Protection Agency has been working on for awhile. And in Kentucky, it’s becoming more feasible.

“I think as the price of solar is dropping, I think we’re starting to see a little bit more demand from the consumers to utilize solar resources,” Stump said.

Soldiers Biking for Health

Sep 17, 2014

About 20 soldiers from Fort Campbell and Fort Knox who've been wounded or injured or who are ill are riding bicycles from one post to the other this week.

Warrior Transition Battalion physical therapist Rebecca Murphy is one of the event coordinators. She says while the soldiers will be pedaling the 164 miles, their cadre and chain of command will be with them, pedaling alongside them.

Murphy says biking gives soldiers obvious health benefits of physical activity and positive social interaction with other riders. She says it also relieves stress.

Soldiers Deploying From Ft. Campbell

Jul 24, 2014

Soldiers from two 101st Airborne Division Brigades from Fort Campbell and from the 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, will deploy to Afghanistan. The deployment will include about 3,600 personnel.

The Defense Department said the deployment involves about 1,000 soldiers from the 1st Brigade and about 900 from the 3rd Brigade from Fort Campbell and about 1,725 from the 82nd Airborne Division.

The military said the deployments are to take place in the fall.

A new stretch of highway connecting Kentucky Routes 220 and 313 in Hardin County has been named in honor of Specialist Nathaniel D. Garvin. 

Garvin, a Radcliff native, died in Kandahar, Afghanistan two days shy of his 21st birthday in July 2010.  He repaired electronics and avionics systems for the Army and had been assigned to Fort Campbell. 

When he died, he left behind a wife and two children.

A dedication was held Friday to mark the occasion after the Kentucky General Assembly passed a joint resolution honoring Garvin earlier this year.

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