Fort Knox

Ft. Knox Army Post

Ireland Army Community Hospital at Fort Knox says it will begin limiting new surgery cases starting next month.

The hospital says the change is due to operating room staffing changes and the impact on maintaining safe, quality care. Cesarean sections and all currently scheduled surgeries will continue, but no new surgeries will be scheduled after June 1.

The hospital is scheduled to become an outpatient clinic and will end inpatient and emergency services by Dec. 15. The hospital said that could happen sooner if staffing becomes an issue.

The hospital said in a news release that service members and TRICARE beneficiaries will continue to have inpatient and surgical care needs met by central Kentucky community health partners.

Wikimedia Commons

A bill introduced by U.S. Sen. Rand Paul would allow Fort Knox to continue producing natural gas to power the Army base.

Almost a year ago, Fort Knox became the first U.S. base to generate all of its own electricity. The move was spurred by the region’s 2009 ice storm; parts of Fort Knox lost power for nearly a week and highlighted the national security need for the base to become self-sufficient.

“It was pretty devastating, and Fort Knox was without power for upwards of seven days in some places,” Fort Knox Energy Manager R.J Dyrdek said in March.

The transition was helped by the discovery of natural gas reserves under the property. Now, Fort Knox is powered by a mixture of solar power, on-site natural gas and geothermal. In 2013, the post unveiled the largest solar panel array on a military installation east of the Mississippi River.

Developing natural gas resources on federal lands usually falls to the Department of the Interior. The bill introduced last week by Paul, a Republican, would make Fort Knox an exception and allow the Department of Defense to keep producing natural gas to power the site.

Counties surrounding Fort Knox are working to lessen their reliance on the post in the face of military cutbacks. 

A study is underway to determine how the region might diversify to improve the local economy.  Wendell Lawrence, executive director of the Lincoln Trail Area Development District, says discussions like this are happening across the country.

"It is Army wide because the end strength seems to be going down quite frequently, and when you have cutbacks in strength, it affects units and installations," Lawrence told WKU Public Radio.

Fort Knox has lost at least 2,3000 soldiers since 2010, in addition to their family members and civilian employees. 

Lawrence says cutbacks at Fort Knox have the potential to affect more than 150,000 residents of Hardin, Larue, and Meade counties. 

He added that the region has several assets as it looks to diversify, including manufacturing, agriculture, and tourism.

Army Recruiting and Retention School Opening at Fort Knox

Feb 10, 2015

The move of the Army's Recruiting and Retention School from Fort Jackson, South Carolina, to Fort Knox, Kentucky, is complete, and the Army is celebrating.

A ribbon-cutting and grand opening is set for 4:30 p.m. EST Wednesday at Fort Knox.

The school had been at Fort Jackson since 1995. The transition began in June.

The Army says almost 100 personnel relocated.

About 3,500 students are expected to attend each year. The school trains noncommissioned officers to be recruiters as well as leaders within U.S. Army Recruiting Command, which is also located at Fort Knox. Ten difference courses are taught at the school.

The relocation is part of integrated force structure changes that support recruiting for the Army of 2025. The move is estimated to save $14 million a year.

More Requirements Expected For Access To Fort Knox

Dec 1, 2014

Officials at Fort Knox say requirements for access to the base are expected to get stricter next year.

Fort Knox Garrison Commander Col. T.J. Edwards told The News-Enterprise that he expects the Army to set a goal of vetting everyone who visits the base by running their information through the Nation Crime Information Center's database.

   Edwards said he expects the change, which stems from a review of the 2013 Washington Navy Yard shooting, to take place next year.

   The Secretary of the Army and the Army Chief of Staff plan to speak later this month about their inquiry into the shooting in which a civilian contractor killed 12 and injured three. Their points will focus on changing access to Army installations to prevent the possibility of a similar attack.

Soldiers Biking for Health

Sep 17, 2014

About 20 soldiers from Fort Campbell and Fort Knox who've been wounded or injured or who are ill are riding bicycles from one post to the other this week.

Warrior Transition Battalion physical therapist Rebecca Murphy is one of the event coordinators. She says while the soldiers will be pedaling the 164 miles, their cadre and chain of command will be with them, pedaling alongside them.

Murphy says biking gives soldiers obvious health benefits of physical activity and positive social interaction with other riders. She says it also relieves stress.

Effort Aims To Help Fort Knox Soldiers Land Civilian Jobs

Sep 16, 2014
U.S. Army

Business organizations in Hardin County, Louisville and southern Indiana are pushing to lure more soldiers who are leaving the military to either move to the area or stay after being discharged from Fort Knox.
 
The groups founded the Where Opportunity Knox initiative aimed at creating a pipeline for veterans who are looking for a post-military place to live and work.

Retired Col. Walter Herd, who runs the soldier transition program at Fort Knox, said on Tuesday that soldiers look for available jobs as well as quality of life when deciding on a post-military home. Herd says the 26 counties around Fort Knox have much to offer.

The initiative is being managed by three regional chambers of commerce -- Greater Louisville Inc., the Hardin County Chamber of Commerce and One Southern Indiana.

Emil Moffatt

The journey across Kentucky continues Thursday morning for 150 military veterans taking part in the Ride 2 Recovery Bluegrass Challenge.  

Dan Wermuth was an avid cyclist growing up.  But a broken back suffered during the Vietnam War kept him away from the bike for years.  That was until a Ride 2 Recovery event came through the Florida town in which he was living.  Since then, he’s taken part in 10 rides, but many of his fellow cyclists are much younger veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“I have a lot of connection with them because…especially coming from the era that I did – they didn’t appreciate us so much when we came home. That’s an understatement.  We will not let that happen for our young guys,” said Wermuth. 

U.S. Army

Soldiers from a Fort Knox-based infantry brigade combat team are set to return home from Afghanistan.

The 110 members of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division are scheduled to arrive at Ft. Knox Friday at midnight. They’ll be welcomed home during a ceremony at the Natcher Physical Fitness Center at the army post.

The event will be the final redeployment ceremony for the brigade, signaling the end of its nine-month deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

The unit has been stationed in the Zabul province in southern Afghanistan, an area larger than the state of Connecticut. The soldiers have been assisting Afghan security forces, government members, and police forces in the province.

Fort Knox Fighting Brigade To Be Phased Out By Year's End

Feb 7, 2014

Army officials have moved up the timetable for the departure of Fort Knox's only fighting brigade.

Maj. Gen. Jeff Smith tells the News-Enterprise the 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division will fully deactivate by the end of the year.

Last summer, the Army announced that 12 brigade combat teams, including Knox's, would be deactivated by 2017 as part of a force reduction of about 80,000. Fort Knox's brigade has more than 3,000 members.

Smith said many soldiers in the unit have already received new assignments and soon will depart.

The general says the "greater part" of 2,000 soldiers and their families tied to the unit will leave in the next six to eight months. Soldiers nearing retirement or who are exiting the Army will remain at Knox.

A U.S. Army sergeant faces a court-martial hearing this week at Fort Knox in the shooting death of a civilian employee last year.

Sgt. Marquinta Jacobs of Radcliff is charged with premeditated murder and aggravated assault in the April 3 death of 51-year-old Lloyd R. Gibert of Elizabethtown. Investigators say Jacobs approached Gibert in the parking lot near the Human Resources Command building where Gibert worked.

The News-Enterprise reports Jacobs' court-martial begins at 8:30 a.m. EST Thursday and Friday.

Nearly 300 Ft. Knox soldiers are home for the holidays after serving a nine-month deployment in Afghanistan.

The soldiers assigned to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division were honored during a ceremony Sunday night at the Hardin County Army post. The 285 troops had been operating in the roughly 7,000–square-mile Zabul Province in southern Afghanistan, assisting Afghan security forces, government representatives, and police forces.

The unit will continue to send soldiers home through next May, with the majority of the brigade home before March.

Elizabethtown Tops List of Military Boom Towns

Nov 6, 2013
Ft. Knox

Elizabethtown, in the shadow of Fort Knox, has been named the number one military boom town in America.

Military spending provides a major boost to the economies of communities like Elizabethtown, which ranks number one in the nation when it comes to population growth, per-capita personal income and gross domestic product.

Other cities in the top five of the list include Clarksville, TN, the home of Fort Campbell.

Department of Defense/Fort Knox

A 27-year-old Army soldier based at Fort Knox has died after his unit was attacked in Afghanistan last Saturday. The military says Army Spc. Angel L. Lopez of Parma, Ohio died in Zabul Province, Afghanistan.  Lopez was a wheeled vehicle mechanic.  It was Lopez’s first deployment overseas.

His awards include the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Combat Star, National Defense service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, NATO medal and the Army Service Ribbon. 

Audit: Army Paid $16M to Deserters, AWOL Soldiers

Sep 27, 2013

Even as the Army faces shrinking budgets, an audit shows it paid out $16 million in paychecks over a two-and-a-half-year period to soldiers designated as AWOL or as deserters. It's the second time since 2006 the military has been dinged for the error.

A memo issued by Human Resources Command at Fort Knox, Ky., found that the Army lacked sufficient controls to enforce policies for reporting deserters and absentee soldiers to cut off their pay and benefits immediately. The oversight was blamed primarily on a failure by commanders to fill out paperwork in a timely manner.

The payments from 2010 to 2012 represent only a fraction of the Army's nearly $44 billion projected payroll for 2013. Auditors and a watchdog group derided the waste as government agencies grapple with automatic spending cuts.

Pages