Ft. Campbell

Federal Trial Reveals Massive Black Market for Ft. Campbell Military Equipment

Aug 30, 2017
Ft. Campbell

More than $1 million in weapons parts and sensitive military equipment was stolen out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and sold in a vast black market, some of it to foreign buyers through eBay, according to testimony at a federal trial this week.

The equipment — some of it re-sold to buyers in Russia, China, Mexico, Hong Kong, Kazakhstan and Ukraine — included machine gun and rifle parts, body armor, helmets, gun sights, generators, medical equipment and more.

Work Completed on Fort Campbell Solar Array

Jun 14, 2017
Ft. Campbell

Kentucky officials say they have completed work on the largest non-utility solar array in the state.

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet says the 5 megawatt array at Fort Campbell will produce enough electricity to power 463 homes.

The project is part of the military post's efforts to comply with the American Renewable Energy Act, which requires federal installations to draw at least 25 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2025.

Ft. Campbell

Dozens of soldiers who have been serving in Africa are returning to Fort Campbell.

The Army post on the Kentucky-Tennessee line said 130 soldiers assigned to 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team "Bastogne," 101st Airborne Division are returning Wednesday. They have served six months with the U.S. Africa Command on the Horn of Africa.

Most of the soldiers were stationed at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, and they also provided security forces in South Sudan.

1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment "Red Currahee", via Facebook

Some 100 Fort Campbell soldiers in the 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team ‘Bastogne’ are returning home Wednesday from Cameroon in Africa. 

The soldiers, known as the ‘Red Currahee,' served in Task Force Toccoa in northern Cameroon. They worked with the country’s air force, state department and non-governmental organizations to expand positive relationships and regional security.

They also worked with U.S. school children and medical outreach, delivering immunizations, clothing and toys to young children.

Dozens of 101st Airborne Soldiers Back at Fort Campbell

Nov 21, 2016
Ft. Campbell

Dozens of 101st Airborne Division soldiers are back at Fort Campbell after a nine-month deployment to Iraq.

The post says about 170 soldiers from Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 101st Airborne, and 101st Airborne Division Artillery was in Iraq as part of the effort to advise and assist Iraqi forces in defeating the Islamic State group.

The soldiers were welcomed back to the post during a ceremony Friday with family, friends and fellow soldiers. The Army post is located on the Kentucky-Tennessee state line.

The commanding general of the 101st, Maj. Gen. Gary J. Volesky, thanked the soldiers for their work and said he was proud of the unit's dedication.

Approximately 1,300 soldiers from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team "Strike" remain in Iraq.

DVIDSHUB / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

A coalition of security forces, led by the US Army’s 101st Airborne Division out of Fort Campbell, have begun an offensive to retake a stronghold of the so-called Islamic State.  

Maj. Gen. Gary Volesky confirmed the action on his Facebook page Monday morning saying that security forces have been “waiting to liberate Mosul for two years, and today is the day.”  

Mosul is ISIS’ largest and last remaining stronghold in Iraq.  

Lt. Gen. Stephen Townsend, commander of the Combined Joint Task Force: Operation Inherent Resolve, says in a YouTube video this may be a tough battle and there’s no telling how long it will last.  

“But the Iraqis have prepared for it and we will stand by them.  The Iraqi security forces and the coalition are not only fighting for the future of Iraq, we are fighting to ensure the security of all of our nations.”

Ft. Campbell

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin says he will order flags lowered to half-staff in honor of a Fort Campbell soldier who has died in Kuwait.

1st Lt. Jeffrey D. Cooper of Mill Creek Washington died Saturday from a non-combat related incident. 

According to a news release, Cooper, 25, was killed in a vehicle rollover accident while traveling from Camp Buehring to Ali Al Salem Airfield.

Cooper was an infantry officer in the 2nd Battalion 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division.

He joined the Army in 2013 and arrived in Fort Campbell in 2015. He has received the National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon. 

The accident is under investigation.

Five Soldiers Injured in Hard Landing During Training

Sep 8, 2016
Fort Campbell

Fort Campbell says five soldiers have been injured in a training exercise.

A statement from the post on the Kentucky-Tennessee border says the soldiers were injured when a helicopter made a hard landing. The statement says the soldiers were in the middle of a routine training exercise Wednesday evening when the incident happened.

All five soldiers were taken to medical treatment facilities, according to the statement. The Army declined to release the nature of their injuries or their conditions.

No further information was available.

Fort Campbell

The U.S. Army is deploying 1,400 Fort Campbell 101st Airborne Division soldiers to Afghanistan. The 3rd Brigade Combat Team deploys this fall to support Operation Freedom’s Sentinel. 

In a news release Tuesday, 101st acting senior commander Brigadier General Scott E. Brower praised the brigade, known as Rakkasans, for combat efforts against al Qaeda and Taliban forces in 2002 and an advise-assist mission in 2014 and 2015.

"From hunting Al Qaeda and Taliban forces during Operation Anaconda in 2002, to performing the advise-assist mission in 2014-15, the soldiers of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team have been nothing short of exceptional while supporting operations in Afghanistan over the years," said Brig. Gen. Scott E. Brower, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) acting senior commander. "The Rakkasans are trained, well-led, and prepared to accomplish any mission given to them while supporting Operation Freedom's Sentinel."

According to the U.S. Army website, Operation Freedom’s Sentinel trains, advises and assists Afghan security institutions and conducts counter-terrorism measures against remaining al Qaeda forces.

U.S. Army Fort Campbell Facebook

Military police have apprehended a soldier after report of an active shooter at Fort Campbell. 

The soldier was in the 101st Airborne Division . The incident occurred near the Campbell Army Airfield. 

Spokesman Robert Jenkins says no injuries were reported and the installation is secure. He says gates are open and there are no threats to the post or local communities.

Ft. Campbell

The US Army is deploying more troops from the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell to Iraq this summer.  

Approximately 400 additional soldiers of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team will support Operation Inherent Resolve as a result of President Obama’s increase in authorized troop levels in Iraq.  

They join the 1,300 soldiers deployed in the spring.  

Last month, Ma. Gen. Gary Volesky said the unit is gearing up to assist Iraqi security forces retake the city of Mosul, which has been a stronghold of the so-called Islamic State since 2014. The troops are working to establish a logistics hub at an air base south of the city.

Volesky said soldiers in Iraq can expect a nine month rotation, unless conditions change in the operation.

Body of Missing Fort Campbell Soldier Found

Jul 13, 2016
Ft. Campbell

The body of a 101st Airborne Division soldier who was swept away by strong currents during severe weather at Fort Campbell has been found.

The post said Tuesday that the soldier was found less than a half-mile from the low water crossing over Little West Fork Creek on the post where he was swept away Friday evening.

The soldier's name hasn't been released pending notification of family.

Civilian and military agencies were called to help find the soldier.

Jerry Buchanan, emergency management director in Montgomery County, Tennessee, told The Leaf-Chronicle that the creek had been swollen by heavy rain.

David Monniaux, Wikimedia Commons

Fort Campbell is closer to breaking ground on an alternative energy project that will build the largest solar array in the state. 

Last week, project coordinators received the green light to break ground in two weeks’ time which will see installation of 5,814 solar modules on 25 acres generating over 2,466 megawatt-hours of electricity annually.  

Ft. Campbell Resource Efficiency Manager Dewayne Smith says the base’s electric utility, Pennyrile Rural Electric Co-op, is fronting the capital costs which will be paid back through the energy savings.  The array will generate a 5 megawatts capacity, alleviating some of the base’s 31 megawatt average monthly demand.

It's also part of a initiative under the American Renewable Energy Act requiring 25 percent of government installations’ power to be produced by renewables by 2025.  For Fort Campbell, those renewables include the solar array as well as a 20 megawatt biomass-burning plant.

Ft. Campbell

A two-state coalition of local governments and chambers of commerce is planning to lobby against looming personnel cuts at Fort Campbell.

The sprawling military base on the Kentucky-Tennessee state line is facing a potential reduction of half its 32,000 payroll as part of sequestration in the Department of Defense’s budget. The Fort Campbell cuts were one of the possible scenarios outlined in a June 2014 Army report.

The reduction would also have a strong negative economic impact on surrounding communities.  

In January, Hopkinsville's city council sent a letter urging Congress to block the possible reduction at the base.

The joint partnership includes the governments of Montgomery and Christian County, Clarksville and Hopkinsville city governments, the Hopkinsville Chamber of Commerce and the privately-funded Aspire Clarksville Foundation. The group has hired Cassidy & Associates to maximize Fort Campbell's exposure in Washington ahead of the DoD's decision.

More than 1,500 western Kentucky and northwestern Tennessee residents gathered at Fort Campbell Tuesday night to share concerns about potential cuts.

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