gun control

The state Senate on Monday overwhelmingly passed a nullification bill that would prohibit Kentucky from enforcing new federal gun control laws if they're enacted, despite concerns about the bill's constitutionality.

The vote was 34-3. Three of the Senate's 14 Democrats voted no, stating that the measure would be trumped by the U.S. Constitution's Supremacy Clause.

Sen. Jared Carpenter, a Berea Republican, sponsored the bill. He said the Supremacy Clause applies only if Congress is acting in pursuit of its constitutionally authorized powers, which he said wouldn't apply to stricter gun measures.

"If I thought the bill would be symbolic, I would've written a resolution," Carpenter told the Associated Press. "I thought it needed more than that."

Indiana Seeing Surge in Gun-Permit Applications

Feb 21, 2013

Indiana State Police are seeing a surge in gun permit requests amid the national gun-control debate sparked by December's deadly Connecticut school shooting.

The Indianapolis Star reports state police are now seeing up to 4,000 permit requests each week. That's three times the number the agency was handling at the same time last year.

Indiana residents make online gun permit applications to the State Police, but those applications are funneled to local police agencies for inspection, fingerprinting and background checks.

Each of those applications must be reviewed and approved or rejected by the local police chief, town marshal or county sheriff.

Hoping to reduce gun violence in Kentucky, two Democratic lawmakers have filed a bill  that would allow Kentucky State Police to set regulations banning certain firearms or high-capacity magazines.

The bill, which state Sen. Kathy Stein plans to file in the Senate on Thursday, would also allow cities and colleges to ban guns and would require private background checks  for every gun sale in Kentucky.

Stein, a Democrat from Lexington, said she's not seeking to infringe on Second Amendment rights from the U.S. Constitution.

"We value the Second Amendment," Stein said. " We recognize that there are very legitimate uses people have for guns, for sporting, for hunting and yes, for self-protection."

The bill's supporters say they are optimistic for a hearing in the short 2013 General Assembly session.

NRA To Hold 2016 Convention in Kentucky

Feb 1, 2013
flickr

The National Rifle Association is returning to Louisville for its national convention in 2016.

The event is expected to draw more than 70,000 visitors as well as national politicians and pundits during that presidential election year.

The NRA held its 2008 convention in Louisville. That was also an election year and the convention heard speeches from John McCain, Mike Huckabee and Karl Rove.

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is questioning whether Democrats, including Majority Leader Harry Reid, really want to see gun control legislation pass this year.

Politico reports McConnell, a Republican from Louisville, said it was "unclear yet as to whether the majority leader wants to bring a gun measure to the floor."

Reid dismissed the notion, saying a gun bill will come out of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Reid wouldn't say whether or not he supports an assault weapons ban proposed by California Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein.

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