Hardin County

The Carl Brashear Foundation

The new Radcliff Veterans Center will be named for a U.S. Navy deep sea diver who overcame social and physical challenges during his 30-year military career.

A dedication ceremony will be held Thursday to name the facility the ‘Carl M. Brashear Radcliff Veterans Center.’

Brashear was the son of sharecroppers and grew up on a farm in Sonora in Hardin County. He joined the Navy 1948 and became the first African-American master deep sea diver.

Brashear overcame racial discrimination and the physical challenge of losing half of his left leg in a shipboard accident. He became the Navy’s first amputee diver.

Brashear retired in 1979 with the top enlisted rank of master chief petty officer. He died in 2006 at the age of 75.

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The Hardin County School district is adjusting its spending habits in anticipation of budget cuts at the state level. The News-Enterprise reports it's in reaction to Gov. Matt Bevin telling state agencies to cut 17 percent from their budgets.

 

Hardin County schools are temporarily freezing spending for professional development. Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt doesn’t expect the Support Education Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK) funding to be affected. That funding makes up a large portion of the school’s revenue. State lawmakers haven’t increased SEEK funding in several years.

Students at a Hardin County elementary school will have access to a unique behavioral health program this fall. The program is a partnership between Meadow View Elementary and Communicare, a mental health clinic in the region.

The program will accept up to ten students who have severe mental or behavioral health problems. Raquel Strickland, manager for Communicare, said participating students will take their classes separately from other students for an average of nine weeks.

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The Kentucky Veterans Cemetery in Radcliff has reached a milestone.

The Hardin County facility held its 5,000th interment Friday.

Louisville native Gisela Nagel was laid to rest at the 49-acre cemetery. She’s the wife of Specialist First Class Willard Nagel, a 20-year Army veteran who is also buriedthere.

Norman Arflack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs, says it's a bittersweet occasion.

“Clearly, this is the least pleasant of our obligations to do—is provide a burial service for any service. But clearly we want to provide them the opportunity to be buried with the dignity they so richly deserve.”

City of Elizabethtown

Shane Howard loves Elizabethtown.

He says living in Elizabethtown — just 45 miles south of Louisville — allows him to remain in close proximity to a bigger city without having to deal with city problems like rush hour traffic.

He’s only 35 minutes away from downtown Louisville. Arguably, Howard says, for someone living in the East End, it can take them the same amount of time to get to downtown. But the cost of living in Elizabethtown is much cheaper.

“The new restaurants popping up, new entertainment things, sports bars and those things popping up, it’s becoming more and more attractive,” he says.

Howard is founder of Custom College Recruiting. The service matches high school student-athletes abroad with sports scholarship opportunities in the U.S. He founded the company in 2009 and received funding in 2014. Prior to that, he bootstrapped. But Howard said he knew if he was going to expand his business from something he was doing at home alone on his couch, he was going to need help.

On a peaceful hillside in Hardin County stands Kentucky's September 11th memorial.

It was first unveiled on the tenth Anniversary of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. With some additions, the memorial is now complete for the fifteenth anniversary this weekend.

Chuck Heater is director of the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery in Radcliff which is home to the memorial. “It’s a reminder that the freedoms that we enjoy every day—we don’t always sit back and think about where they come from, and we sometimes taken them for granted. But this is a reminder that the freedoms we enjoy have been paid for by a great price.” 

The latest additions to the memorial include a pair of winged walls.

“The right one depicts the scenes from that day, and the far left is a granite wall with names inscribed of all the Kentucky veterans who have been killed in action since 9/11 defending America against terrorism," Heater said.

Kentucky's 9/11 memorial will be dedicated Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery in Radcliff. The public is invited to attend the event.

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Two dozen Hardin County area nonprofits are trying to gain a better picture of the local homeless population.

The groups are hoping to draw 300 to 400 families to an event Wednesday afternoon in Elizabethtown.

Megan Stith, President and CEO of United Way of Central Kentucky, says the groups are reaching out to those who may have been missed during a statewide homeless count conducted earlier this year.

According to Stith, those could be people “who are living with relatives, in between housing situations and staying with friends, or have family staying in multiple locations, or staying in a shelter or some kind of temporary or transitional housing.”

Stith says the event will be a one-stop opportunity for those who are housing or food insecure in Hardin County to learn more about local programs that can help. Feeding America is providing food distribution at the event.

Counties surrounding Fort Knox are working to lessen their reliance on the post in the face of military cutbacks. 

A study is underway to determine how the region might diversify to improve the local economy.  Wendell Lawrence, executive director of the Lincoln Trail Area Development District, says discussions like this are happening across the country.

"It is Army wide because the end strength seems to be going down quite frequently, and when you have cutbacks in strength, it affects units and installations," Lawrence told WKU Public Radio.

Fort Knox has lost at least 2,3000 soldiers since 2010, in addition to their family members and civilian employees. 

Lawrence says cutbacks at Fort Knox have the potential to affect more than 150,000 residents of Hardin, Larue, and Meade counties. 

He added that the region has several assets as it looks to diversify, including manufacturing, agriculture, and tourism.

A traveling replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall is coming to Hardin County this week as part of a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the war.

The traveling wall contains all of the names of U.S. military personnel killed during the war, and will arrive in Radcliff on Thursday. Event organizer and Vietnam veteran David Cowherd says the replica wall offers a chance for those who haven’t seen the Washington memorial to pay tribute to those who died, as well POWs and MIAs.

“They served there with us, and they are in some case family members and really close friends. So it helps with some of the healing, in my view,” said Cowherd, who served in the Navy during the war in southeast Asia.

The replica wall will be on display in Radcliff from Thursday through Sunday. Area schools are bringing students to see the wall, and a candlelight service honoring Hardin County natives killed in the Vietnam War is being held Saturday night.

Vietnam War veterans are invited to a Sunday afternoon group photo shoot in front of the traveling wall.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Vex Robotics

The Hardin County School System is preparing to host a group of international robotics teams ahead of a major competition next week in Louisville.

The VEX Robotics World Championships are being held Wednesday through Saturday at the Kentucky Expo Center and Freedom Hall. The competition features teams from elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as colleges from all across the world.

Some Central Hardin High School robotics team members will get some special practice before they head to Louisville for the championships.

Jason Neagle, with the Hardin County Schools Early College and Career Center, says fifteen teams from China and Singapore will spend Monday and Tuesday in Elizabethtown, where they will practice their robotics and engineering programs.

“Our students are going to get the opportunity to work alongside with them. The Chinese teams are some of the top-ranked teams in the world, and we have some Top-30 ranked teams as well.”

Two Elizabethtown cancer doctors are being sued for allegedly extending chemotherapy treatments in order to make more money.

Six former patients and the estates representing two other patients are suing Doctors Yusef Deshmukh and Rafiq Rahman, accusing the two of diluting the drugs used to treat their cancers, so that the treatment period would be made longer. The Courier-Journal reports the alleged actions by the doctors between 2006 and 2014 allowed them to improperly bill Medicaid and other programs for reimbursements.

Deshmukh and Rahman are already under investigation by the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure related to the allegations.

The suit asks for unspecified damages and says the patients were made to unnecessarily retain catheters and ports inside their bodies.

The defendants have not yet filed a legal response to the suit. Meanwhile, the doctors accused in the suit are allowed to continue their practice, and their clinic remains open.

Someone has paid $28,050 for the right to purchase the first bottle of bourbon produced in Hardin County in nearly 125 years. 

Boundary Oak Distillery churned out its first batch of bourbon this month and held an online auction to sell barrel sponsorships. 

Boundary Oak Master Distiller Brent Goodin says the product inside that barrel should be top quality, when it’s ready to drink in two years.

“We have a very unique distillery in the fact that all of our water comes a spring-fed source. Our grains are all here from Hardin County,” said Goodin. “We think along with those natural aspects of our distillery, along with our wonderful grains that we have here locally, we can make a very superior, high-quality bourbon.”

Goodin says a change in law has made it easier for craft distillers to exist. The $28,000 paid by the auction winner is believed to be one of the top prices ever paid for a Kentucky bourbon.

Four Kentucky children remain hospitalized after suffering an apparent E. coli infection. The cluster of cases is being investigated by the Lincoln Trail District Health Department based in Elizabethtown. 

The first illness was reported in mid-August. Health Department Public Information Officer Wendy Keown says investigators are trying to determine if there is a common cause. 

"We thoroughly investigate activities such as recent travel, exposure to animals, food histories. You know, have they been swimming anywhere? And try to find any commonality between those to determine a source.  As of right now, there has not been a confirmed source of infection identified," said Keown.

The five children sickened with hemolytic uremic syndrome range in age from 18 months to six years. 

Keown says they are suffering kidney related problems. She says three of the children are from Hardin County and one each from Oldham and Boone Counties. 

Kentucky is taking another step toward creating a six-lane Interstate 65 stretching from the Tennessee border to the Ohio River.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has awarded a nearly $139 million contract to the Bowling Green-based Scotty’s Contracting to rebuild 17 miles of I-65  in Hardin, Hart, and Larue counties. The effort would widen the road to six lanes from its current four, with three running both north and south.

The project is expected to be completed in 2017, and will stretch from mile point 65 in Hart County, near Munfordville, through Larue County and on to mile point 82 near Sonora in Hardin County. Once the latest widening is completed, only ten lanes of I-65 south of Elizabethtown will be four lanes.

The highway is already six lanes between Elizabethtown and Louisville.

The I-65 widening project began in 2000, with over $600 million dollars in contracts awarded for the effort.

Ft. Knox

Hardin County area business and political leaders are in the final stages of an effort to stave off proposed cuts at the Fort Knox military post.

The Army has said Ft. Knox could lose up to 4,100 soldier and civilian jobs if maximum cuts are implemented in 2016. That would be on top of the 3,500 positions already eliminated with the inactivation of the Third Brigade Infantry Combat Team, which is winding down operations by the close of this year.

Under the worst-case scenario facing the post, $500 million in payroll would be lost if the latest cuts become a reality.

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