Hardin County

A traveling replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall is coming to Hardin County this week as part of a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the war.

The traveling wall contains all of the names of U.S. military personnel killed during the war, and will arrive in Radcliff on Thursday. Event organizer and Vietnam veteran David Cowherd says the replica wall offers a chance for those who haven’t seen the Washington memorial to pay tribute to those who died, as well POWs and MIAs.

“They served there with us, and they are in some case family members and really close friends. So it helps with some of the healing, in my view,” said Cowherd, who served in the Navy during the war in southeast Asia.

The replica wall will be on display in Radcliff from Thursday through Sunday. Area schools are bringing students to see the wall, and a candlelight service honoring Hardin County natives killed in the Vietnam War is being held Saturday night.

Vietnam War veterans are invited to a Sunday afternoon group photo shoot in front of the traveling wall.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Vex Robotics

The Hardin County School System is preparing to host a group of international robotics teams ahead of a major competition next week in Louisville.

The VEX Robotics World Championships are being held Wednesday through Saturday at the Kentucky Expo Center and Freedom Hall. The competition features teams from elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as colleges from all across the world.

Some Central Hardin High School robotics team members will get some special practice before they head to Louisville for the championships.

Jason Neagle, with the Hardin County Schools Early College and Career Center, says fifteen teams from China and Singapore will spend Monday and Tuesday in Elizabethtown, where they will practice their robotics and engineering programs.

“Our students are going to get the opportunity to work alongside with them. The Chinese teams are some of the top-ranked teams in the world, and we have some Top-30 ranked teams as well.”

Two Elizabethtown cancer doctors are being sued for allegedly extending chemotherapy treatments in order to make more money.

Six former patients and the estates representing two other patients are suing Doctors Yusef Deshmukh and Rafiq Rahman, accusing the two of diluting the drugs used to treat their cancers, so that the treatment period would be made longer. The Courier-Journal reports the alleged actions by the doctors between 2006 and 2014 allowed them to improperly bill Medicaid and other programs for reimbursements.

Deshmukh and Rahman are already under investigation by the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure related to the allegations.

The suit asks for unspecified damages and says the patients were made to unnecessarily retain catheters and ports inside their bodies.

The defendants have not yet filed a legal response to the suit. Meanwhile, the doctors accused in the suit are allowed to continue their practice, and their clinic remains open.

Someone has paid $28,050 for the right to purchase the first bottle of bourbon produced in Hardin County in nearly 125 years. 

Boundary Oak Distillery churned out its first batch of bourbon this month and held an online auction to sell barrel sponsorships. 

Boundary Oak Master Distiller Brent Goodin says the product inside that barrel should be top quality, when it’s ready to drink in two years.

“We have a very unique distillery in the fact that all of our water comes a spring-fed source. Our grains are all here from Hardin County,” said Goodin. “We think along with those natural aspects of our distillery, along with our wonderful grains that we have here locally, we can make a very superior, high-quality bourbon.”

Goodin says a change in law has made it easier for craft distillers to exist. The $28,000 paid by the auction winner is believed to be one of the top prices ever paid for a Kentucky bourbon.

Four Kentucky children remain hospitalized after suffering an apparent E. coli infection. The cluster of cases is being investigated by the Lincoln Trail District Health Department based in Elizabethtown. 

The first illness was reported in mid-August. Health Department Public Information Officer Wendy Keown says investigators are trying to determine if there is a common cause. 

"We thoroughly investigate activities such as recent travel, exposure to animals, food histories. You know, have they been swimming anywhere? And try to find any commonality between those to determine a source.  As of right now, there has not been a confirmed source of infection identified," said Keown.

The five children sickened with hemolytic uremic syndrome range in age from 18 months to six years. 

Keown says they are suffering kidney related problems. She says three of the children are from Hardin County and one each from Oldham and Boone Counties. 

Kentucky is taking another step toward creating a six-lane Interstate 65 stretching from the Tennessee border to the Ohio River.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has awarded a nearly $139 million contract to the Bowling Green-based Scotty’s Contracting to rebuild 17 miles of I-65  in Hardin, Hart, and Larue counties. The effort would widen the road to six lanes from its current four, with three running both north and south.

The project is expected to be completed in 2017, and will stretch from mile point 65 in Hart County, near Munfordville, through Larue County and on to mile point 82 near Sonora in Hardin County. Once the latest widening is completed, only ten lanes of I-65 south of Elizabethtown will be four lanes.

The highway is already six lanes between Elizabethtown and Louisville.

The I-65 widening project began in 2000, with over $600 million dollars in contracts awarded for the effort.

Ft. Knox

Hardin County area business and political leaders are in the final stages of an effort to stave off proposed cuts at the Fort Knox military post.

The Army has said Ft. Knox could lose up to 4,100 soldier and civilian jobs if maximum cuts are implemented in 2016. That would be on top of the 3,500 positions already eliminated with the inactivation of the Third Brigade Infantry Combat Team, which is winding down operations by the close of this year.

Under the worst-case scenario facing the post, $500 million in payroll would be lost if the latest cuts become a reality.

Hardin County Firefighter Remembered in Service

Aug 12, 2014
Kentucky News Network photo

Glendale firefighter Jonathan French was eulogized in Elizabethtown, less than a week after his tragic death along I-65.

French was killed and his mother, Linda, also a firefighter, was injured when a semi hit their fire engine as they battled a car fire along the Interstate last Wednesday.

His funeral service was held at Elizabethtown's First Christian Church. The eulogy was delivered by French's uncle, Glendale Fire Chief Richie Peters who said Jonathan had wanted to stick close to him ever since he was young.

Glendale Reverend Doug Sanders said Jonathan was a great example of someone who practiced "selfless service" during his brief life.

A new stretch of highway connecting Kentucky Routes 220 and 313 in Hardin County has been named in honor of Specialist Nathaniel D. Garvin. 

Garvin, a Radcliff native, died in Kandahar, Afghanistan two days shy of his 21st birthday in July 2010.  He repaired electronics and avionics systems for the Army and had been assigned to Fort Campbell. 

When he died, he left behind a wife and two children.

A dedication was held Friday to mark the occasion after the Kentucky General Assembly passed a joint resolution honoring Garvin earlier this year.

Second Mistrial for Hardin County Father in Infant Death

Jun 16, 2014

The second trial for a Hardin County father accused in the death of his month-old son has ended with a hung jury. Prosecutors had accused 25-year-old Jarrod Davis of murder and abuse in the 2013 death of Ja'Vion Davis.

Jurors sent a note to the judge late Friday after more than six hours of deliberations saying they could not reach a unanimous verdict in the case.

An indictment said Davis "wantonly engaged in conduct that created a grave risk of death" to the child. A medical examiner found blunt force trauma to the baby's head and several other injuries. Davis said the injuries occurred when he dropped the infant.

Davis' first trial also ended with a hung jury.

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