Harvey

Nicole Erwin

The impact of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma is reigniting talk about national infrastructure needs. Parts of southern Kentucky recently saw flooding after Harvey moved inland. Kentuckians are facing billions of dollars in water infrastructure needs, and uncertainty on a federal infrastructure spending plan.

 

President Trump has mentioned the need for a one-trillion-dollar national infrastructure investment, but no details have come out. Most of the projects on Kentucky’s infrastructure wish list deal with highways and roads, not water.


American Red Cross

A Bowling Green woman has responded to more than two dozen natural disasters but says Hurricane Harvey is the worst she's seen because it’s so widespread. 

Carol Gray is a Red Cross volunteer working near Corpus Christi, Texas.  She’s going to shelters and neighborhoods, providing meals to displaced or stranded residents.  This is her 24th disaster response, and Gray says each experience is different, but the takeaway is the same.

"Always appreciate what you have because it can be gone in the blink of an eye," Gray told WKU Public Radio.

Gray plans to leave Texas this weekend and will likely head to Florida as that state braces for a possible hit from Hurricane Irma. 


Flooding from Hurricane Harvey has been widespread across Houston, Texas, and surrounding areas. While the storm has dissipated, water remains in many homes.

People are starting to return to the Nottingham Forest subdivision, an upscale area located just north of Buffalo Bayou, which has been heavily flooded. Homes that are closer to the bayou had anywhere from 2 to 5 feet of flooded water on Thursday. A lot of that flooding resulted from a controlled release of water from nearby reservoirs.

Sam Oldenburg, the Talisman

Tropical depression Harvey flooded roads and buildings across south central Kentucky Thursday night and Friday, causing many schools to be closed and activities canceled.

Warren County Emergency Management reports portions of about two dozen roads have been impassable at various times due to heavy rainfall.  

Kentucky Mesonet data shows between five and six inches of rain fell at monitoring stations from Smiths Grove to Bowling Green.

Barren River Animal Welfare Association Facebook

Friday morning rain has led to flooding in parts of the region, causing some school systems to call off classes, and low-lying areas to be inundated with water. 

A flash flood warning was in effect for Bowling Green and surrounding counties in southern Kentucky and northern Tennessee until Friday afternoon. Water crossed over roadways and heavy winds knocked down trees across some streets.

Warren County Road Division removed 15 trees blocking roadways as of early Friday afternoon.

Bowling Green Warren County Regional Airport has recorded more than five and a half inches of rain. The Kentucky Mesonet, based at Western Kentucky University, recorded rainfall amounts of more than seven inches in Todd and Logan counties. 

Six days after Hurricane Harvey first crossed the Texas coast, Houston is still in rescue mode with people stranded in houses and apartments.

With the authorities overwhelmed by the scope of the flooding, private citizens have been rushing to Houston and towing their own boats to conduct rescues.

Rene Galvan has come to a makeshift boat launch on flooded Highway 90, looking for rescuers. In a soaked, blue hoodie, he sits anxiously in the bow of an aluminum boat, wondering how they're going to get to 14 members of his extended family who have been stranded by rising water.

Disasters like the flooding that has followed Hurricane Harvey, displacing thousands of people, always create a tremendous need for help — and a tremendous desire to provide that help.

But those who have dealt with disasters before say people need to be careful about how they contribute to disaster relief, and when. Cash donations are almost always preferred over items — such as blankets, clothing and stuffed animals — often sent into overwhelmed disaster areas by well-meaning donors.

Staff Sgt. Joshua Horton, U.S. Air National Guard

Eighteen members of the Kentucky Air National Guard are in Texas helping stranded residents in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. 

The 123rd Special Tactics Squadron out of Louisville specializes in swift-water rescues, confined-space operations, and emergency medical care. 

"The 123rd STS has taken all of it's equipment down, ATVs and inflatable motor boats, to provide search and rescue, and any support as needed," said Major Steve Martin.