health

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Kentucky’s children have experienced--on average-- more Adverse Childhood Experiences than children nationwide.

An Adverse Childhood Experience, or ACE, can be the death or incarceration of a parent, witnessing or being a victim of violence, or living with someone who has a drug or alcohol problem.

 

According to a recent report from The National Survey of Children’s Health, about 53 percent of children in Kentucky have had at least one ACE. That’s significantly higher than the national rate of about 46 percent. The report adds those experiences can increase the risk of smoking, alcoholism, depression and other illnesses or unhealthy behaviors.

Tightening the screws on pricey imaging exams, health insurer Anthem will no longer allow many patients to get MRI or CT scans at hospital-owned outpatient facilities, requiring them to use independent imaging centers instead. The insurer began phasing in these changes in July and expects to finish by March.

Anthem says the change is aimed at providing high-quality, safe care while reducing medical costs.

Kentucky Leaders Respond After GOP Pulls ACA Repeal

Sep 26, 2017
NPR

The latest attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act has failed.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday announced he is pulling the Republican health care bill.

The Graham-Cassidy bill would have eliminated the mandate that people buy insurance or pay a fine. It also would have done away with subsidies that help people purchase insurance and it would have scrapped the national exchange, Healthcare.gov.

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

Republicans are once again waving the white flag on health care.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that he is pulling the Republican health care bill because it does not have the votes.

Rather than endure another embarrassing vote that sees his caucus come up short, the senators agreed in a closed-door meeting to shelve the bill.

The latest Republican push to repeal key parts of the Affordable Care Act appears to have met the fate of all previous Senate repeal efforts this year — it doesn't have the votes needed to pass the chamber.

Maine Sen. Susan Collins announced Monday that she will oppose the bill, authored by South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham and Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy. Collins' decision means three Republicans have now publicly said they are against the bill — and that is one more than the GOP could afford to lose.

Senate Republicans' latest plan to overhaul the U.S. health care system ends with a massive shift of federal money from states that expanded Medicaid — and are largely dominated by Democrats — to those that refused to expand.

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A Kentucky judge has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to overturn the state’s ban on marijuana for medical purposes.

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate recognized in a ruling Wednesday that marijuana has the potential for medicinal use. But he said the three people who filed the lawsuit do not have a constitutional right to violate a controlled-substance law.

Twenty-nine states have legalized marijuana in some way, the most common being for medical purposes. Kentucky lawmakers have failed to consider proposals to do so. In 2014, the legislature allowed the limited prescription of cannabidiol, which comes from the cannabis plant.

Republicans' complex health care calculations are coming down to simple math.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell needs 50 of the chamber's 52 Republicans to vote for a bill that aims to repeal most of the Affordable Care Act and drastically reshape the Medicaid system. McConnell's office is planning to bring the bill up for a vote next week.

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A new program is aimed at making it easier for Owensboro residents to quit smoking. The plan will provide nicotine supplies for free to those interested.

The Green River District Health Department is in charge of the program and is responsible for giving out supplies. The Messenger-Inquirer reports up to eight weeks of nicotine patches, gum or lozenges will be given to those who sign up for the smoking cessation program through the website Quit Now Kentucky.

Mary Meehan

Edwin Hall is dressed in a footed onesie covered in the pastel shades of monkeys and hippos. Although Edwin’s just seven weeks old he already tells his mom when he’s hungry with a sharp and persistent yelp.

Soon after he gets her attention, Edwin is practicing his sucking technique. His mom, Sarah, with the dazed look of the sleep deprived, talks with a La Leche League volunteer at the Madison County, Kentucky, Health Department about some breastfeeding challenges.


The Capitol Hill health care fight sure seemed dead. After Republican proposals to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, failed to pass a Republican-controlled Congress, lawmakers looked poised to move on to other topics, like a tax overhaul. But this week, proposals from both the left and the right are grabbing headlines.

Kentucky Leads Nation in Decrease of Those Without Insurance

Sep 14, 2017
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Kentucky is one of the states most affected by former President Barack Obama's health care law, new data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows.

Yet it's also a state that has elected some of the law's biggest opponents.

In 2013, 14.3 percent of Kentucky's population had no health insurance. By 2016, just 5.1 percent of the population lacked coverage. That's a 64 percent decline, the largest of any state in the country according to data from the American Community Survey released this week. It's similar to data from other national polls, including the Gallup-Healthways Survey.

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The rankings for the happiest states in America are in - and Kentucky is pretty far down the list. 

Kentucky residents won’t be cheered up by the state’s ranking of number 44 on the new WalletHub Happiness survey. The rankings are based on 28 metrics that include satisfaction with daily life, work environment, worries about money, rates of depression, volunteer rate and participation in sports.

In the category of ‘emotional and physical well-being,’ the Bluegrass State came in 46th.

J. Tyler Franklin

Amanda Mills has insurance through Kentucky’s expanded Medicaid program. She also has a full-time job working with homeless people in Louisville.

In January, she’ll lose Medicaid coverage because she makes $1,000-a-year more than the threshold, which is about $28,000 per year. And, she says, she won’t be able to afford the insurance her employer offers, plunging her into a familiar gap created by the Affordable Care Act where people earn too much for Medicaid but too little for a subsidy to assist with premiums.

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At 14, Donna Pollard’s anger and outbursts landed her in a youth behavioral facility in Southern Indiana.

There, she met a 29-year-old man who counseled troubled teens. He would brush up against her and smile.

“I was a 14-year-old with a crush,” Pollard said.

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