health

Health
8:12 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Pet Owners Warned to Avoid Leaving Dogs Inside Cars on Hot Days

The increasingly high summer temperatures are bringing the normal reminders to avoid leaving children alone in vehicles.  But an Evansville animal shelter says pet owners also need to be aware of the dangers of leaving dogs inside hot vehicles.

Vanderburgh Humane Society Executive Director Kendall Paul says many dog owners make the mistake of thinking it’s OK to leave their pet in a vehicle with the windows cracked. She says the temperature inside that vehicle increases very quickly.

“I always recommend to people—try it yourself. Go out there on a hot and sit in that car for a few minutes with the windows rolled up, or even with them cracked a little bit, and you’re going to start to see what kind of temperatures very fast you’re putting your animal in. But we just recommend that you don’t do it.”

Paul adds that pet owners often tell themselves they’ll only be gone for a few minutes, and that their animal will be fine inside the car without any air conditioning.

“And often times if you just run in for a few minutes, you think it’s just going to be a few minutes in the store, but then it takes a little bit longer, or something delays you,” Paul said. “It only takes a short  amount of time—once the temperatures outside start hitting in the 70s and 80 degrees, the temperature inside that car is going to climb even higher than that.”

Published research shows a car in 84-degree weather reached an interior temperature of 110 degrees in about 18 minutes. In 88-degree weather, the car reached 110 in about 14 minutes.

The research also found that cracking a window had little effect on the car's temperature.

Health
5:28 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Lawmakers Hear Impassioned Testimony Over Legalizing Medical Marijuana

Will Kentucky be the next state to legalize medical marijuana?

State lawmakers heard Wednesday another round of impassioned testimony over legalizing medical marijuana in the state.

The legislature’s Interim Joint Committee on Health & Welfare heard pleas from a nurse practitioner and people with disabilities who say that the drug, which is currently available for medicinal use in 22 states, would alleviate symptoms of pain.

Louisville Democratic Rep.Tom Burch says he thinks it’s just a matter of time before it’s legalized for medical use.

“I was here when we criminalized the use of marijuana back in the 70s," Burch said. "It was a rush to, you know, get these criminals off the street, and all this kind of stuff that was going on. It was ill advised, but it was a good election year and everybody wanted to be against crime, so that's why we passed it, so that a little bag of marijuana would get you five years."

The legislature will take up the issue again next month when it will examine the effects of marijuana on post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans.

NPR News
4:52 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

Home, Food Or Health Care: A Choice Many Renters Can't Afford

As the number of renters in Los Angeles increases, construction of new apartments isn't keeping pace with demand, resulting in rents higher than many can afford.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 1:56 pm

The mortgage crisis that devastated the economy has received endless attention, but it's not just homeowners who have suffered badly in this economy.

As of 2012, renters made up 35 percent of American households. Their numbers are growing, reversing a decades-long uptick in homeownership.

And in the past 50 years, the percentage of income they're spending on the rent has increased dramatically. A quarter of renters are spending more than half their income on rent.

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Regional
3:21 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Doctor at Monroe County Medical Center Arrested, Charged with Prescribing Meds that Led to Death

A south-central Kentucky doctor has been charged with prescribing pain medications outside of her professional practice, resulting in the death of a patient.

A federal grand jury in Bowling Green indicted Dr. Clella Hayes of Glasgow on Wednesday. Hayes is charged with issuing and authorizing prescriptions for fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, Demerol, hydrocodone, Cheratussin and Valium over a five-year period.

The grand jury also alleged that Hayes gave the painkiller fentanyl to a patient in 2011, causing the patient to die.

Hayes was arrested Wednesday.

Hayes is listed among the family practitioners at Monroe County Medical Center in Tompkinsville. Court records did not list an attorney for Hayes. A message left for Hayes and hospital administrators was not immediately returned Wednesday afternoon.

Health
2:36 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

VA Health Care's Chronic Ailments: Long Waits And Red Tape

Soldiers returning from the Pacific wave from the deck of the USS General Mitchell on Dec. 11, 1945. Much of the health care demand in the VA system is from veterans of earlier wars.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:40 pm

More than 2.5 million veterans served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and they qualify for health care and benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. These recent vets have been putting in for more service-related conditions than previous generations, for everything from post-traumatic stress disorder and brain injury to the bad knees, bad backs and bad hearing that nearly every new vet seems to have.

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Health
9:50 am
Tue May 27, 2014

States Consider Using Medicaid To Pay College Health Plan Premiums

Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., says having Medicaid pay for some students' coverage through the school health plan will give those students better options.
Alex/Flickr

Some students headed to college this fall will get top-drawer health coverage at little or no cost.

How? Medicaid, it turns out, will pay the premium for the student health plan.

Proponents say students who are eligible for Medicaid, the health insurance program for low-income people, get access to a wider network of doctors and hospitals by getting coverage through the college health plans. These broad networks can be an important consideration for students who travel for internships, international study or who return to homes far from school during the summer.

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Health
2:07 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Cancer Research Partnership Between U of L and Owensboro Gets $5.5 Million Grant

The James Graham Brown Cancer Center in Louisville has been partnering with Owensboro Health in an effort to create new cancer vaccines.
Credit The University of Louisville

One of Kentucky’s most well-known cancer treatment centers is receiving a multi-million dollar grant to find new treatments and vaccines.

The James Graham Brown Cancer Center at the University of Louisville announced Friday that they have been given a three-year, $5.5 million dollar grant from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust.

The Center’s director, Doctor Donald Miller, says the grant will help continue a partnership between U of L and Owensboro Health that is exploring the use of plant-based pharmaceuticals and vaccines.

“We have two vaccines--one for cervical cancer, one for colon cancer that are ready to move forward  into early phase clinical trials, and this grant will primarily support the testing of those vaccines over the next three years,” Dr. Miller said.

The grant will also seek to further develop plant-based drugs that would allow a higher concentration of anti-cancer drugs to be delivered to tumors.

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Health
1:49 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Older Women May Actually Be More At Risk For Cervical Cancer

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 9:35 am

Women are often told they don't have to get a Pap test for cervical cancer if they're over 65, but the data behind that recommendation might underestimate their cancer risk, researchers say.

That's because many studies don't take into account that many women have had hysterectomies. The surgery removes a woman's risk of cervical cancer; no cervix, no cancer. And 20 percent of the women over age 20 in this study said they had had that surgery.

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Health
4:15 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Less Nutritious Grains May Be In Our Future

Wheat fields like this one could yield wheat with less zinc and iron in the future if they are exposed to higher levels of CO2, according to the journal Nature.
Zaharov Evgeniy iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:26 am

In the future, Earth's atmosphere is likely to include a whole lot more carbon dioxide. And many have been puzzling over what that may mean for the future of food crops. Now, scientists are reporting that some of the world's most important crops contain fewer crucial nutrients when they grow in such an environment.

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Health
8:41 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Employers Eye Moving Sickest Workers To Insurance Exchanges

Would he be happier with a health plan bought on the exchange? His boss probably would be.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 11:40 am

Can corporations shift workers with high medical costs from the company health plan into online insurance exchanges created by the Affordable Care Act? Some employers are considering it, say benefits consultants.

"It's all over the marketplace," said Todd Yates, a managing partner at Hill, Chesson & Woody, a North Carolina benefits consulting firm. "Employers are inquiring about it, and brokers and consultants are advocating for it."

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