health

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A new report shows nearly three-quarters of American adults report having at least one unhealthy behavior, such as smoking. But when it comes to multiple unhealthy behaviors associated with chronic disease, nearly 17 percent of Kentucky adults have three or more risk factors.

The report, America’s Health Rankings Spotlight: Impact of Unhealthy Behaviors, examines the prevalence of multiple unhealthy behaviors and inequities within groups. It was compiled by United Health Foundation.

The behaviors included smoking, physical inactivity, excessive drinking, obesity and insufficient sleep.

Ana Fuentevilla, chief medical officer for United Health Care Community and State Program, said those five unhealthy behaviors, especially together, worsen the general population’s health.

“Just by working on one and eliminating that unhealthy behavior, you can really improve the health of that individual,” she said.

J. Tyler Franklin

Thousands of Kentuckians have erroneously received letters notifying them that they would no longer receive state benefits like Medicaid or food stamps.

Meanwhile, access to the new state system that handles those programs has been restricted and service spotty in many instances, leading to long wait times, frustration and a loss of benefits for countless Kentuckians.

At a news conference Thursday, Gov. Matt Bevin and members of his administration acknowledged myriad problems with Benefind, which operates as the umbrella portal for Kentuckians to apply for nearly all entitlement services.

The administration also acknowledged it knew of problems with the system before its Feb. 29 launch. Many of those problems are detailed in a “defect guide” sent to state employees days before the system’s rollout and obtained by WFPL News.

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The Kentucky Department for Public Health has confirmed the state’s third case of Zika virus.

The latest case of Zika has been diagnosed in a pregnant woman from Louisville who traveled to region of Central American affected by Zika.

The health department reports that the woman has recovered from the illness.

Scientific evidence is suggesting a link between the Zika virus and babies born with birth defects.

Kentucky health officials are advising anyone  traveling to areas affected by the virus to consult with their doctor. It’s important to avoid bites from mosquitos because they can carry the Zika virus.

The virus has not been found to be circulating in the mosquito population in Kentucky.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

The dean of the University of Louisville’s School of Public Health & Information Sciences is joining other university deans in urging the federal government to rethink its approach to fighting cancer.

The federal Cancer Moonshot Task Force was launched earlier this year with $1 billion to develop new ways to detect and treat cancer. But in a letter sent earlier this week to task force leader Vice President Joe Biden, U of L Dean Craig Blakely and 71 other deans said they were concerned the approach misses the mark.

“We urge you to pay careful attention to the balance between treatment and prevention-related investments,” the letter said.

Blakely said he supports the federal government investing in cancer research, but the initiative is missing a meaningful contribution to prevention.

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A new report shows Medicaid expansion in Kentucky would continue to save the state money were it to remain in its current form.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released the report Tuesday. It examines the financial effects of Medicaid expansion in 11 states and the District of Columbia.

Overall, the report found state spending in Medicaid expansion states grew by half as much as spending in non-expansion states between 2014 and 2015.

“There are a lot of examples of people whose care can be funded under Medicaid expansion,” said Kathy Hempstead, director of coverage for RWJF. “That’s sort of an easy way for states to save money on people they were providing services to anyway.”

In fiscal year 2014, Kentucky saved $2.4 million on coverage for medically needy enrollees, which accounts for six months of savings, according to the report. In the next fiscal year, the state is expected to save $14 million.

Second Confirmed Case Of Zika Virus In Kentucky

Mar 22, 2016
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A western Kentucky man has tested positive for Zika virus, according to the Kentucky Department of Public Health.

The man became infected with the virus after traveling in a Caribbean country, according to DPH. The agency did not identify the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the test results to DPH Monday.

The agency said the man has fully recovered from the illness.

Zika, an infectious viral illness, is primarily spread through the bite of a mosquito that carries the virus. Zika is not known to be circulating in the mosquito population in Kentucky – or any other part of the United States.

The virus is linked to the birth defect microcephaly, a congenital condition associated with incomplete brain development and abnormal smallness of the head. It has also been associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome, which can cause paralysis in individuals who have been infected.

Earlier this month, a Louisville man who had recently been traveling in a Central American country tested positive for the virus. DPH said they expected him to fully recover.

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The health care industry in Kentucky continued to add jobs in 2015, according to newly revised data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The Kentucky Center for Economic Policy analyzed the data and found 10,500 more people work in the health care industry in January 2016 than in the same month two years prior. Jobs in health care were up nearly 5 percent over 2014, while the overall economy in Kentucky saw 3.1 percent job growth in that period.

Jason Bailey, executive director of KCEP, said employment in health care and social assistance sectors picked up after the implementation of the Medicaid expansion, which former Gov. Steve Beshear did under the Affordable Care Act.

“So many more people have health care coverage and are going to the doctor, and that’s very likely having a strong influence on the job growth that we’re seeing,” he said.

More than 500,000 Kentuckians have gotten health coverage via expanded Medicaid and the state’s insurance exchange, Kynect, since the program began. The rate of uninsured in Kentucky has dropped from 20.4 percent before Kynect to 7.5 percent today, according to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin and officials from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services discussed Kentucky’s first confirmed case of Zika virus on Thursday.

A Louisville man who had recently been traveling in a Central American country tested positive for the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the test results March 9.

Bevin said the best way to prepare for more potential cases of the virus is through education, knowledge and forward thinking.

“As people are thinking about service projects and mission trips and any number of other things that may take them into Zika virus-infected areas, it’s important for Kentuckians to start to think about what the impact might be in our state,” he said.

Vickie Yates Glisson, secretary of CFHS, said the agency — through the Department of Public Health — has been preparing for a potential Zika case for several months.

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Kentucky health officials are urging parents of college students to make sure their children are up-to-date on their mumps vaccination.

A statement from the Kentucky Department of Health on Wednesday says recent cases at the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville underscore the need to keep immunizations current.

Officials say the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine should be given in two doses at least 28 days apart. If college students don’t have documentation showing they have had both shots, they are advised to update their vaccinations.

Mumps is an infectious disease known primarily for swelling of the parotid glands, which results in puffy cheeks and swollen jaws.

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Kentuckians have judged their own health in the latest Kentucky Health Issues Poll.

The biggest group of respondents—43 percent—reported their health as “very good or excellent.” The percentage of adults who said their health was either “good” or “fair or poor” was pretty close at 26 percent and 31 percent, respectively.

The poll, released Monday, also asked Kentucky adults to name the most important thing they could do to improve their health.

The most common answer was to increase exercise by walking, running, weightlifting and being more active overall.

Jacob Ryan, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration has filed a lawsuit against a second Kentucky abortion provider, alleging the facility provided abortions without a license.

The lawsuit was filed Wednesday against Eubanks & Marshall of Lexington, PSC, which does business as EMW Women’s Clinic. It alleges the clinic wasn’t properly licensed, and didn’t have proper transfer agreements in place with a hospital and ambulance service. The Cabinet for Health and Family Services filed the lawsuit.

“Last month it was brought to our attention that EMW in Lexington is operating without a license,” said CHFS Secretary Vickie Yates Glisson in a press release. “Our inspectors visited the location and confirmed that EMW is unlicensed and does not have the required ambulance transfer agreement in place to protect women in the case of emergency. Furthermore, the inspector found the facility in an unsanitary condition. Regrettably, the location had not been inspected since 2006. There are laws in place to protect our citizens, and we will ensure the laws are upheld.”

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Before landing a $3.1 million no-bid state contract on Gov. Steve Beshear’s last day in office, the software company that counts a former Beshear cabinet secretary’s husband as a “partner” had already received $8.1 million worth of state business outside of the competitive bidding process.

SAS Institute, a Cary, N.C., technology company, was hired in 2012 to develop a fraud-detection system for Kynect, the state-owned health insurance exchange. It didn’t have to bid for a state contract of its own. Instead, according to Kentucky Finance & Administration Cabinet records, it piggybacked into the job through a “modification” of the main contract with Deloitte Consulting.

As the arrangement was taking shape, one man — Frank Lassiter of Midway, Ky. — had connections on both sides. For SAS, he had just begun serving as one of more than 1,000 technology “partners” listed on its website. For the Beshear administration, Lassiter was executive director of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services’ Office of Administrative and Technology Services until 2011. His wife, Mary Lassiter, was state budget director before being named secretary of Beshear’s Executive Cabinet in 2009. Both contributed money to Beshear’s re-election campaign in 2011.

Jessica Ditto, spokeswoman for Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, said the governor’s office is weighing the possibility that political — and marital — connections paved the way for SAS.

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Kentucky’s new health secretary says her state agency will meet proposed budget reductions through a variety of cost-cutting measures, such as not filling vacant positions and cutting back on travel.

Under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed spending cuts, the cabinet’s budget will be reduced by $64 million over the next two years and $31 million this year.

Secretary Vickie Yates Brown Glisson, who heads up the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, said Wednesday that implementing the cuts allows her a “clean look” at the cabinet’s programs and services.

“It does give us an opportunity to evaluate areas that certainly haven’t been delivering a satisfactory return on investment,” Glisson said.

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The expansion of Medicaid has closed an economic gap for health insurance in Kentucky, according to the latest Kentucky Health Issues Poll.

The poll shows more lower-income adults have become eligible for insurance since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and the expansion of Medicaid. In 2013, before the expansion took effect, more than three in 10 adults earning less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level were uninsured.

Now, only one in 10 adults earning that same amount are uninsured, according to the poll.

Susan Zepeda, president and CEO of the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, said the ACA and Medicaid expansion are a step towards health equity in Kentucky.

“What this is doing is improving the equity to access in health care by reducing those gaps between lower income people who have insurance and the number of higher income people who have insurance,” said Zepeda.

Lisa Autry

This is the second of a two-part series on proposed changes to Kentucky Medicaid and how Governor Matt Bevin wants to model the program after a similar one in Indiana.  You can see Part 1 here.

When the federal Affordable Care Act was rolled out, Indiana was faced with the same dilemma as other states: give health coverage to more of the uninsured by expanding Medicaid, while taking on hundreds of millions of dollars in costs. 

Indiana Governor Mike Pence persuaded the federal government to approve an alternative for his state. Just over a year ago, the state implemented the Healthy Indiana Plan 2.0.  Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin wants to launch a similar program as he looks to revamp his state's Medicaid system. 

In the year since Indiana implemented the Healthy Indiana Plan 2.0, or HIP, more than 370,000 Hoosiers have enrolled in the program.  Among them is Mary Buchanan, who is self-employed.  A shoulder injury no longer allows her to work full-time.  By working less, the 63-year-old from Rockport couldn’t afford the private insurance she used to carry.  She picked up the Healthy Indiana Plan 2.0, or HIP, about a year ago.

"One less thing for me to worry about 24\7, said Buchanon, who met WKU Public Radio at the Spencer County Library.  "What if something happens to me?  Am I going to have to file bankruptcy?  One trip to the hospital can wipe you out.”

Under HIP 2.0, Buchanan pays just under $14 a month in premiums and has no co-pays or deductibles for her medical care.

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