Health

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The Kentucky Department for Public Health has confirmed the state’s third case of Zika virus.

The latest case of Zika has been diagnosed in a pregnant woman from Louisville who traveled to region of Central American affected by Zika.

The health department reports that the woman has recovered from the illness.

Scientific evidence is suggesting a link between the Zika virus and babies born with birth defects.

Kentucky health officials are advising anyone  traveling to areas affected by the virus to consult with their doctor. It’s important to avoid bites from mosquitos because they can carry the Zika virus.

The virus has not been found to be circulating in the mosquito population in Kentucky.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

The dean of the University of Louisville’s School of Public Health & Information Sciences is joining other university deans in urging the federal government to rethink its approach to fighting cancer.

The federal Cancer Moonshot Task Force was launched earlier this year with $1 billion to develop new ways to detect and treat cancer. But in a letter sent earlier this week to task force leader Vice President Joe Biden, U of L Dean Craig Blakely and 71 other deans said they were concerned the approach misses the mark.

“We urge you to pay careful attention to the balance between treatment and prevention-related investments,” the letter said.

Blakely said he supports the federal government investing in cancer research, but the initiative is missing a meaningful contribution to prevention.

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A new report shows Medicaid expansion in Kentucky would continue to save the state money were it to remain in its current form.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released the report Tuesday. It examines the financial effects of Medicaid expansion in 11 states and the District of Columbia.

Overall, the report found state spending in Medicaid expansion states grew by half as much as spending in non-expansion states between 2014 and 2015.

“There are a lot of examples of people whose care can be funded under Medicaid expansion,” said Kathy Hempstead, director of coverage for RWJF. “That’s sort of an easy way for states to save money on people they were providing services to anyway.”

In fiscal year 2014, Kentucky saved $2.4 million on coverage for medically needy enrollees, which accounts for six months of savings, according to the report. In the next fiscal year, the state is expected to save $14 million.

In Louisville Visit, McConnell Touts Anti-Opioids Bill

Mar 23, 2016
Abbey Oldham, WKU Public Radio

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell visited a Louisville organization Tuesday to talk about federal legislation that would help boost substance abuse treatment programs across the country.

McConnell met with officials from the Louisville chapter of Volunteers of America to discuss the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, or CARA.

The bill would authorize the U.S. Attorney General to award grants to address the national epidemics of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use, which have hit Kentucky and Southern Indiana particularly hard. The Senate overwhelmingly approved the legislation earlier this month, with both McConnell and Sen. Rand Paul voting in favor.

“People like myself and other members of our delegation will be backing up grant applications that will be made from organizations like this to try to help them expand and treat more people,” McConnell said Tuesday.

Grayson County schools

Chefs are working with schools in eight Kentucky counties to increase the use of fresh food from local farmers. The goal is to create healthier and more appealing meals for students. 

The project is called the Chefs in Schools Collaborative.

Grayson County’s six schools have a chef working with food service staff during the month of March.

School district food service director Kristy Hodges says chef Chris Byrd has helped create lower sodium and less processed food with more natural seasonings.  

“In the past we had used a prepackaged mix for our taco seasoning and he’s helped some of the ladies in the schools come up with their own seasoning recipes,” says Hodges. “He’s doing the same thing with the chili recipe. We used to order spaghetti sauce.”

The students are confirming that the healthier recipes are proving the value of the visiting chef.

Second Confirmed Case Of Zika Virus In Kentucky

Mar 22, 2016
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A western Kentucky man has tested positive for Zika virus, according to the Kentucky Department of Public Health.

The man became infected with the virus after traveling in a Caribbean country, according to DPH. The agency did not identify the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the test results to DPH Monday.

The agency said the man has fully recovered from the illness.

Zika, an infectious viral illness, is primarily spread through the bite of a mosquito that carries the virus. Zika is not known to be circulating in the mosquito population in Kentucky – or any other part of the United States.

The virus is linked to the birth defect microcephaly, a congenital condition associated with incomplete brain development and abnormal smallness of the head. It has also been associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome, which can cause paralysis in individuals who have been infected.

Earlier this month, a Louisville man who had recently been traveling in a Central American country tested positive for the virus. DPH said they expected him to fully recover.

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The health care industry in Kentucky continued to add jobs in 2015, according to newly revised data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The Kentucky Center for Economic Policy analyzed the data and found 10,500 more people work in the health care industry in January 2016 than in the same month two years prior. Jobs in health care were up nearly 5 percent over 2014, while the overall economy in Kentucky saw 3.1 percent job growth in that period.

Jason Bailey, executive director of KCEP, said employment in health care and social assistance sectors picked up after the implementation of the Medicaid expansion, which former Gov. Steve Beshear did under the Affordable Care Act.

“So many more people have health care coverage and are going to the doctor, and that’s very likely having a strong influence on the job growth that we’re seeing,” he said.

More than 500,000 Kentuckians have gotten health coverage via expanded Medicaid and the state’s insurance exchange, Kynect, since the program began. The rate of uninsured in Kentucky has dropped from 20.4 percent before Kynect to 7.5 percent today, according to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin and officials from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services discussed Kentucky’s first confirmed case of Zika virus on Thursday.

A Louisville man who had recently been traveling in a Central American country tested positive for the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the test results March 9.

Bevin said the best way to prepare for more potential cases of the virus is through education, knowledge and forward thinking.

“As people are thinking about service projects and mission trips and any number of other things that may take them into Zika virus-infected areas, it’s important for Kentuckians to start to think about what the impact might be in our state,” he said.

Vickie Yates Glisson, secretary of CFHS, said the agency — through the Department of Public Health — has been preparing for a potential Zika case for several months.

First Confirmed Case of Zika Virus in Kentucky

Mar 10, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

The Kentucky Department for Public Health has confirmed the state’s first case of Zika virus.

A Louisville-area man who had recently been traveling in a Central American country tested positive for the virus, according to a press release from DPH. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the test results March 9.

The agency said the man, who is back in Louisville, is doing well and expected to fully recover from the illness.

Zika, an infectious viral illness, is primarily spread through the bite of a mosquito that carries the virus. Zika is not known to be circulating in the mosquito population in Kentucky – or any other part of the United States.

Ruth Carrico, clinical director of Vaccine and International Travel Center at University of Louisville, said it was only a matter of time before the virus made its way to Kentucky.

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Kentucky health officials are urging parents of college students to make sure their children are up-to-date on their mumps vaccination.

A statement from the Kentucky Department of Health on Wednesday says recent cases at the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville underscore the need to keep immunizations current.

Officials say the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine should be given in two doses at least 28 days apart. If college students don’t have documentation showing they have had both shots, they are advised to update their vaccinations.

Mumps is an infectious disease known primarily for swelling of the parotid glands, which results in puffy cheeks and swollen jaws.

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Kentuckians have judged their own health in the latest Kentucky Health Issues Poll.

The biggest group of respondents—43 percent—reported their health as “very good or excellent.” The percentage of adults who said their health was either “good” or “fair or poor” was pretty close at 26 percent and 31 percent, respectively.

The poll, released Monday, also asked Kentucky adults to name the most important thing they could do to improve their health.

The most common answer was to increase exercise by walking, running, weightlifting and being more active overall.

Jacob Ryan, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration has filed a lawsuit against a second Kentucky abortion provider, alleging the facility provided abortions without a license.

The lawsuit was filed Wednesday against Eubanks & Marshall of Lexington, PSC, which does business as EMW Women’s Clinic. It alleges the clinic wasn’t properly licensed, and didn’t have proper transfer agreements in place with a hospital and ambulance service. The Cabinet for Health and Family Services filed the lawsuit.

“Last month it was brought to our attention that EMW in Lexington is operating without a license,” said CHFS Secretary Vickie Yates Glisson in a press release. “Our inspectors visited the location and confirmed that EMW is unlicensed and does not have the required ambulance transfer agreement in place to protect women in the case of emergency. Furthermore, the inspector found the facility in an unsanitary condition. Regrettably, the location had not been inspected since 2006. There are laws in place to protect our citizens, and we will ensure the laws are upheld.”

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The expansion of Medicaid has closed an economic gap for health insurance in Kentucky, according to the latest Kentucky Health Issues Poll.

The poll shows more lower-income adults have become eligible for insurance since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and the expansion of Medicaid. In 2013, before the expansion took effect, more than three in 10 adults earning less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level were uninsured.

Now, only one in 10 adults earning that same amount are uninsured, according to the poll.

Susan Zepeda, president and CEO of the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, said the ACA and Medicaid expansion are a step towards health equity in Kentucky.

“What this is doing is improving the equity to access in health care by reducing those gaps between lower income people who have insurance and the number of higher income people who have insurance,” said Zepeda.

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services has launched a new website, Benefind, for Assistance Programs.

Media outlets report that the service launched Wednesday. Benefind can be used to apply for Medicaid, the Kentucky Children's Health Insurance Program and Kentucky Transitional Assistance Program. Those applying for SNAP and KTAP are required to complete an interview with the Department of Community Based Services to receive assistance.

Residents can also use the website to renew benefits, check benefit amounts, report changes, upload verification documents, check claim status, make claim payments and receive electronic notices.

Benefind replaces Kynect, the state health insurance exchange, as the portal to enroll in some of the state's assistance programs. Gov. Matt Bevin has plans to dismantle Kynect by the end of the year.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Brandy Shaul

This is the first in a two-part series on Medicaid, Kentucky's expansion of the government-subsidized program, and proposed changes to Medicaid.

As Governor Matt Bevin prepares to re-design Kentucky’s Medicaid program, a new national survey shows the commonwealth with the second-largest gains in insurance coverage. 

More than half-a-million Kentuckians obtained coverage under the federal Affordable Care Act.  Some 80 percent of the newly insured went onto the Medicaid rolls. 

But many Medicaid enrollees are worried about what lies ahead under the state’s new Republican governor.  Teresa Bowley was at a recent health insurance sign-up event in Bowling Green to ask a question about changing providers.  Six months ago, she qualified for coverage through Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion. 

Now when she gets sick, she goes to the doctor. But that hasn’t always been the case. 

”You just don’t. You just try to think this will go away on its own.  You have to miss work," Bowley explained.

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