Health

The Northern Kentucky Health Department is urging area residents to consider vaccinations for infants and booster shots for older children and adults who spend time around infants. The Department says the increasing number of whooping cough cases reported recently is a reason to be concerned.

A decades-long court fight between a Christian health organization and the Kentucky state government is drawing the ire of some Tea Party activists. Christian Care MediShare allows people to sign up for accounts and pay into a shared fund, then draw money to pay medical expenses. The state Supreme Court has ruled that MediShare is an insurance company and is not allowed religious exemptions to state law.

Safety experts usually urge motorcycle riders to wear helmets, but the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is urging motorcyclists not to wear the 5x5 brand, SA-08 model helmet. That product fails to meet federal head protection requirements.

A report released by the Kentucky Division of Water says violations involving contaminants and treatment dropped from 2010 to 2011 in the Commonwealth. The Annual Compliance Report is required by the federal Safe Drinking Water Act.

Groundbreaking ceremonies took place in Bowling Green Wednesday for a Health Sciences Complex that will be constructed on the campus of the Medical Center. Those speaking at the ceremony stress that  the new structure will help to provide instruction for nursing and physical therapy students at WKU.

A blood center serving six hospitals in our region is putting out the word for type A Negative blood donations. The Western Kentucky Regional Blood Center works with hospitals in Breckinridge, Caldwell, Christian, Crittenden, Daviess, and Ohio counties.

A Kentucky law firm that specializes in nursing home abuse cases is pushing back on nursing home company Extendicare’s claim that the state’s legal environment is causing it to pull back its operation.

The latest Tennessee Men’s Health Report Card is out, with mostly bad news for the Volunteer State. Tennessee men get F’s for a host of mortality measures, including deaths by lung, head, and neck cancer, liver disease, motor vehicle accidents, suicides, and homicides.

A continued contract dispute between an Eastern Kentucky hospital network and the largest private Medicaid operator in the state is leading to confusion in the region. CoventryCares and Appalachian Region Healthcare are locked in a legal dispute over a new contract, with another court hearing scheduled for Tuesday.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission says Kentucky currently ranks second in the nation in terms of fatal All Terrain Vehicle accidents. Randy Chrisman of the Kentucky Farm Bureau's Safety and Rural Health Advisory Committee says residents of the state need to remember that ATVs are "powerful machines that can cause serious injuries" if they aren't used properly.

A Western Kentucky health board is considering a new policy that would require restaurants to prominently post a letter grade corresponding to their department inspection scores. 

A major nursing home chain is leaving Kentucky. Extendicare Health Services says its decision is the result of increased litigation and the recent General Assembly's inaction on tort reform. Extendicare has 21 skilled nursing centers and more than 1,700 beds in Kentucky.

A Kentucky lawmaker says implementation of a federal mandate to allow private companies to compete for Medicaid contracts in Louisville could be delayed. Currently, Medicaid in Louisville and the surrounding area is managed by the private company Passport Health Plan. But the federal government has ordered Kentucky to open the area to competition. And the company United Healthcare is already attempting to gain a foothold in the region.

After months of mounting problems, State Auditor Adam Edelen says he will launch a full investigation into Kentucky’s statewide Medicaid Managed Care system. Edelen created a Medicaid task force in February after taking a first look at the managed care system. He also gave recommendations to managed care companies, health care providers and the state on how to make the system run better in the future.

Gordon Wilkerson, OMHS

A medical team in Owensboro is preparing to use a robotic surgical unit to perform a single-incision gall bladder removal. Friday's procedure at Owensboro Medical Health System will use a device known as the da Vinci Surgical System, which has been in use there since 2009.

Pages