Indiana health officials say more than 100 people have tested positive for HIV in an outbreak of the virus among intravenous drug users in southeastern Indiana.

The state’s Joint Information Center said Friday that as of Thursday there had been 95 confirmed HIV cases and 11 preliminary positive cases tied to the outbreak.

All of the HIV cases have been linked to needle-sharing among intravenous drug users.

Scott County — about 30 miles north of Louisville, Kentucky — is the epicenter of Indiana’s largest-ever HIV outbreak.

Gov. Mike Pence declared a public health emergency in the county on March 26 that allowed the creation of a limited needle-exchange program that aims to stem the spread of the virus.

The nation's drug czar was in Kentucky Thursday to tout needle-exchange programs as a way to reduce the spread of disease and to steer heroin users into treatment.

Michael Botticelli, the director of National Drug Control Policy, visited northern Kentucky, which has been hard hit by heroin abuse addiction. He was invited to Kentucky by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

During his speech, Botticelli said needle-exchange programs are a way to reduce the spread of hepatitis and HIV by discouraging use of dirty needles by multiple people.

He said the programs reduce the risk that law enforcement officers will be infected by accidental needle sticks. Kentucky lawmakers last month passed sweeping anti-heroin legislation.

One component allows local governments to set up needle-exchange programs where addicts can swap dirty needles for clean ones.

On the first day of its new HIV clinic, the Community Outreach Center in Austin, Ind., is quiet.

Rows of chairs line the lobby. Health care providers walk in and out of  doors that lead to private testing areas, treatment resources and other services. The makeshift center is dubbed a One- Stop Shop, sanctioned and overseen by the Indiana State Department of Health.

State and local health officials have begun a needle-exchange program in a southern Indiana county where an HIV outbreak among intravenous drug users has grown to nearly 90 cases.

Scott County’s needle-exchange program started Saturday morning under an emergency executive order signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence.

That 30-day order temporarily suspended Indiana’s ban on such programs, but only for the southern Indiana county about 30 miles north of Louisville.

The program is open only to Scott County residents through the Community Outreach Center in the city of Austin that’s at the epicenter of the epidemic. That region now has  84 confirmed HIV cases and five preliminary positive cases.

Each participant will initially receive enough needles for one week to help combat needle-sharing that’s caused the epidemic.

Indiana is launching a needle exchange program in Scott County to combat an outbreak of HIV related to intravenous drug use.

Disease intervention specialists from nearby counties and states, including Kentucky, have been called upon to assist.

Louisville is about 40 miles south of Scott County, and Kentucky officials are battling this state’s own issues with intravenous drug use—specifically, with a spike in heroin use.

But Kentucky health officials have not seen a surge in new HIV cases despite the Indiana outbreak, said Dr. Kraig Humbaugh, director of the division of epidemiology and health planning for Kentucky.

He said he expects Louisville physicians to see an increase in the number of people seeking treatment for HIV from Southern Indiana.

He said it’s too early to tell whether the Indiana HIV outbreak will also lead to an increase in Kentucky.

In 2013, there were 392 newly diagnosed HIV cases in Kentucky, according to the 2014 HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report.

Dr. William Cooke knew he wanted to practice medicine in a rural town. He’s been a physician in Austin, Indiana, for 10 years—and he’s the only physician in town.

“I went there specifically to bring access to care,” he said.

Austin is in  Scott County, which is at the center of national focus because of an HIV outbreak attributed to intravenous drug use.

To meet the crisis, Cooke is providing a much-needed free HIV clinic for the small city of about 4,300 people. So far, more than 80 people Scott County have tested positive for HIV since the end of the year.

On Tuesday, Cooke and his team at Foundations Family Medicine opened an HIV clinic in their existing office in Austin, about 40 miles north of Louisville.  They were joined by representatives from the Indiana State Department of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Indiana Family and Social Service Administration and local health departments.

On its first day, about 30 people stopped by the HIV clinic either for testing or to initiate HIV treatment, he said. All of the services and care were provided free of charge.

“The people of Austin deserve to have their own clinic to get treatment from and not require them to travel to Louisville or Indianapolis,” he said.

An increase in Medicaid services and a decline in the private insurance market in rural Kentucky has hit rural hospitals hard, according to State Auditor Adam Edelen.

More than two-thirds of Kentucky’s rural hospitals are below the national average on a financial strength rating system, and more than one-third are considered to be in poor financial health, according to a report released Monday.

Governor Mike Pence has declared a public health emergency in one southern Indiana county. 

An HIV epidemic has been linked to intravenous drug use in Scott County. 

Deputy State Health Commissioner Jennifer Walthall says people are abusing a powerful painkiller that’s a cousin to Oxycontin and heroin.

"It's Oxymorphone, which the trade name for that is Opana," Walthall explained to WKU Public Radio.  "It's an incredibly powerful and potent opiate that comes in pill form, but can be crushed, boiled, and then injected."

The Indiana State Department of Health has confirmed 71 cases of HIV.  In comparison, Dr. Walthall says Scott County typically sees around five new HIV cases a year. 

The state is preparing to set up a temporary needle exchange program that will allow addicts to swap out dirty needles for clean ones in an effort to stop the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C.

The three Kentucky hospitals that treat the most heroin overdoses are getting reversal kits to hand out to patients.

The kits will go to University Hospital in Louisville, the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, and St. Elizabeth Hospital in northern Kentucky.

The kits contain naloxone, which can restart breathing in people who have overdosed.

The initiative to hand out 2,000 kits was announced Tuesday by first lady Jane Beshear and Attorney General Jack Conway.

Fewer than half of people with Alzheimer’s disease were told their diagnosis by their physician, according to a report released Tuesday.

The 2015 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report, released by the Alzheimer’s Association, found that only 45 percent of people ages 65 and older with Alzheimer’s were told the diagnosis by their doctor.

Elizabeth Betts, special events manager for the Greater Kentucky and Southern Indiana chapter, said the figures are alarming.

“All people living with Alzheimer’s disease deserve the opportunity to know the truth about their diagnosis because this allows them to maximize the quality of their life and to play an active role with their families in planning for their futures,” she said.

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in Kentucky. In 2012, 1,462 Kentuckians died from the disease. There has also been a 72 percent increase in Alzheimer’s deaths in the state since 2000.

In Indiana, 2,104 people have died from Alzheimer’s. The state has also experienced a 74 percent increase in Alzheimer’s deaths since 2000.

The association said disclosing an Alzheimer’s diagnosis has benefits, including an opportunity for a second opinion and better medical care.

“Waiting until later in the course of the disease, because it is a progressive  brain disease, this has the potential to deprive the person to seek the care and treatment early in the disease,” Betts said.