Owensboro, Ky – For the second time since a massive earthquake hit Haiti in January, Dr. Philip Hurley of Owensboro is heading on a medical mission. Hurley is an orthopedic surgeon who is volunteering his time to help the countless victims of the quake. On his first trip, Dr. Hurley performed numerous operations, including many amputations. He's expecting more of the same this trip. He spoke with Kevin Willis from his Daviess County office.

Owensboro, Ky – In Owensboro, an alcohol and drug rehabilitation center is taking an unusual approach in helping addicts get clean. The Owensboro Regional Recovery center doesn't employ doctors, nurses, or professional counselors. Instead, former addicts serve as peer mentors for residents. The Daviess County facility targets male addicts who are homeless. Kevin Willis recently visited the center and has our report.

Owensboro, Ky – An Owensboro doctor is speaking out about what he saw during a medical mission to Haiti. Dr. Charles Milem is a surgeon with Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in Daviess County. After the devastating earthquake last month, Dr. Milem spent a week in Haiti performing surgeries--many of them amputations--under challenging conditions. He spoke to WKU Public Radio about how the experience has changed him.

Bowling Green, Ky – The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce wants state employees to start paying part of their health insurance premiums. The state-wide business group says these payments would help to offset revenue shortfalls that could threaten a number of state programs, including funding for education. But, the Kentucky Education Association says the Chamber's proposal is a step in the wrong direction.

Elizabethtown, Ky – A new business is open in Elizabethtown, but city and county leaders aren't exactly rolling out the red carpet. In fact, the opening of a methadone clinic in Hardin County is causing quite a bit of controversy. Lisa Autry traveled to Elizabethtown and has our report.

Owensboro, Ky – The Owensboro Medical Health System is the latest hospital in Kentucky to use a new piece of surgical technology known as the da Vinci. The system is changing the way procedures like hysterectomies are performed, with many patients experiencing much shorter recovery times. Kevin Willis visited OMHS and spoke with a surgeon who explained how the da Vinci system works.

Owensboro, Ky – The head of the Owensboro Medical Health System says a new hospital would greatly improve the experience of those seeking care. OHMS President and CEO Jeff Barber believes a new facility is necessary to serve those in Daviess County, as well as those who come from surrounding counties such as Henderson, Ohio, and Union. Groundbreaking is set to take place in March, with the new hospital opening in 2013. Kevin Willis went to Owensboro to learn more about what the hospital will look like.

Louisville, Ky – Kentucky's most innovative HIV researcher says he's excited about the news concerning a recent clinical trial involving 16,000 adults in Thailand. Dr. Kenneth Palmer is a Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Louisville. He says many in the field of HIV prevention had given up hope that a vaccine was possible. The Thailand study showed those who took a combination of vaccines had a 31% decreased risk of contracting the virus that causes AIDS.

Nashville, TN – One researcher who contributed to the 2009 Tennessee Women's Health Report Card says the results show the state is paying for unhealthy lifestyles. The first-of-its-kind effort in Tennessee gives the state failing or near-failing grades in categories such as obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. We spoke with Dr. Katherine Hartmann, Director of Women's Health Research at Vanderbilt University, and Tennessee Health Commissioner Susan Collins.

Bowling Green, Ky – The use of robots in surgical procedures is increasing across the US, as more surgeons look for ways to perform less invasive procedures. Dr. Matthew Rutter is the leader of the Da Vinci Surgical Team at The Medical Center in Bowling Green. He spoke to our Dan Modlin about how the new system works.

Bowling Green, Ky – An Elizabethtown-based group that serves 42 Kentucky counties is trying to get food to hungry children. Feeding America, Kentucky's Heartland is trying to rally support for its "Adopt-A-Backpacker" program, which provides basic food items for children to take home on the weekends. Each Friday, school personnel put a bag of food in the child's backpack. The organization's Development Director, Tami Delaney, says this is done to avoid stigmatizing the child. Kevin Willis reports.

Owensboro, Ky – Groundbreaking HIV research ongoing in Owensboro could one day impact the lives of people in the developing world. Dr. Kenneth Palmer is leading a study that has successfully grown an HIV-blocking protein in the Kentucky tobacco plant. Kevin Willis visited Dr. Palmer's offices in Owensboro to learn about the research and how it could one day save lives by preventing the spread of the virus that causes AIDS.

Elizabethtown, Ky – More than 3,000 children in a 21 county region in Kentucky are now receiving backpacks full of food on the weekend. Through a program of the Elizabethtown-based group known as Second Harvest, school children are given food items to make sure they have something to eat when they aren't at school. Dan Modlin recently spoke with Tami Delaney about the program, and has this report.

Owensboro, Ky – The Boulware Mission in Owensboro may very well be one of the best kept secrets in Kentucky. The homeless shelter/substance abuse treatment center has gained a reputation for graduating clients--many of whom return to help at the mission. Boulware is in the process of renovating an abandoned nun convent where the mission will be able to house triple the number of clients it currently serves. Kevin Willis visited Boulware and has this report.

Bowling Green, Ky – Drug task forces across the US are predicting devastating consequences about an impending 67% reduction in federal funding. Tommy Loving of the Bowling Green-Warren County Drug Task Force says he fears a rise in the number of meth dealers if the group's budget is cut. Lisa Autry has our report.