Health

Kentucky's Medicaid Managed Care Organizations say they have fixed a number of issues with reimbursements to pharmacists. CoventryCares, WellCare and Kentucky Spirit took over management of the state's Medicaid system last year. Since then, doctors and pharmacists have come forward to say the organizations are poorly managed and the reimbursements for care are too low.

Governor Steve Beshear says the problems with Kentucky’s new Medicaid Managed Care system will be resolved.
 Beshear pushed for the managed care system last year to take some of the administrative burden of Medicaid off of the state. But earlier this week, doctors, pharmacists and hospital officials told lawmakers there were significant problems with the system.

Spalding

Health officials in Lexington say a stomach ailment has spread from last weekend's basketball tournament at the Kentucky Basketball Academy. The Fayette County Health Department has received dozens of complaints about nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting from people who attended the event.

Kentucky’s private Medicaid providers say they need immediate changes in the state Medicaid system. Kentucky turned the system over to managed care providers four months ago. And Wednesday,  doctors, pharmacists and hospital executives told a Senate committee how disastrous the change has been.

A US Department of Agriculture grant will make it possible to expand telemedicine services to Grayson County. Through the use of this technology, some medical specialists at Norton Healthcare in Louisville will be able to provide diagnosis to patients at Twin Lake Regional Medical Center in Leitchfield.  Twin Lakes CEO Steve Meredith believes the program can help to control some medical costs, by avoiding duplication in testing, and by reducing the number of trips to Louisville for some patients.

Leaders from the fields of law enforcement, education, and medicine will meet today in Lexington, for the first Statewide Prescription Drug Abuse Summit in Kentucky. The issue has become a very serious concern across the state, as the number of people dying from prescription overdoses has increased. In fact, more people now die in Kentucky from prescription overdoses than are killed on the state's highways each year.

Bowling Green,KY – As the number of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia increases, some experts in the field are offering advice for caregivers. They say trying to maintain a sense of humor and knowing when to ask for help are keys.Dan Modlin has this report, titled "Dealing with Dementia."

Nashville, TN – The Drug Enforcement Agency in Nashville says several factors could lead to an increase in heroin abuse in the region. Agent Mike Stanfill tells WKU Public Radio high school and college aged white men are increasingly smoking and snorting the drug because they think it's safer than injecting it with a needle. Another reason is the increasing cost of prescription pain pills is driving some addicts to cheaper ways to get high. Kevin Willis has more.

Bowling Green, KY – Twice a year, four inspectors from the Warren County Health Department inspect the more than 1,300 food establishments in Warren County making sure they're clean and safe for the public. Joe Corcoran went behind the scenes on a recent surprise inspection to find out what goes into their reports.

Bowling Green, Ky – America is remembering the life of former First Lady Betty Ford, who passed away Friday at the age of 93. A Glasgow surgeon has a unique connection to Mrs. Ford. Dr. William Thistlethwaite of TJ Sampson Hospital is the son of James Thistlethwaite, who diagnosed Mrs. Ford's breast cancer and assisted in her subsequent surgery. William spoke to WKU Public Radio about his father's role in helping Mrs. Ford, and the impact of her advocacy on behalf of women's health issues.

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