Henderson County High School

Rhonda J Miller

The executive director of the Henderson Area Arts Alliance has only been on the job for three months. But Alex Caudill knows his territory. He’s a Henderson native who knows first-hand that there’s strong support in the region for getting more people involved in all of the arts – especially to fill the 980-seat theater.

“I think we need to provide a little more higher quality programming. We need to bring in some name acts, names that people know, to get people back in the door again. It’s kind of dwindled a little bit, our attendance has, with the shows that we’ve provided, so I think that’s something we need to work on.”

He says lots of tops artists have performed in Henderson, including Merle Haggard, Glen Campbell, Emmylou Harris, Allison Krauss and the Oak Ridge Boys.

Caudill says his other priority is getting more young people involved in the arts. He says he knows the value of the arts first-hand.

Henderson County High School

Students still have time to apply to the new School of Fine Arts at Henderson County High School. The original deadline for students to apply was Jan. 10, but because Henderson County schools were closed for two snow days recently, the deadline has been moved to Tuesday, Jan. 17.  The high school is creating the school within a school to offer tracks, called pathways, in visual arts, dance, theater, voice and instrumental music. 

Andrew Miller is choir director at Henderson County High School and says he's seeing interest in the project among area students.

A Henderson County program that helps troubled high school students turn their lives around is getting statewide attention because of its success rate.

Since the Center for Youth Justice Services opened a year and a half ago at Henderson County High School, it has served about 130 students and cut down the number referred to court. The center offers services for behavioral, family and school-related problems.

Student Le-Onta Carey told The Gleaner that the center gave her the support and resources she needed to turn her life around. She says last year, she was struggling in classes and on the path to court. Now, she has clear goals and direction.

Steve Steiner, who is director of pupil personnel at Henderson County schools, says there is interest in expanding the program to other schools.

WKU Public Radio

On Monday, approximately 1,000 students at Henderson County High School will hear about the consequences of prescription drug abuse. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway and Van Ingram, Executive Director of the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy, will speak to students.

Ingram told WKU Public Radio that an alarming number of teens have been experimenting with prescription medications in the state and region. He says that experimentation is especially dangerous because many young people are taking medications that may interact with other pills they have taken. State officials in Kentucky say autopsy results from those dying from prescription overdose frequently find that a "cocktail" mixture of pills.