heroin

Kentucky LRC

With two working days to go, Kentucky lawmakers still haven’t nailed down legislation to address the state’s growing heroin problem and it’s ailing teachers pension system.

On Friday, legislators from both chambers met for hours, trying to craft compromises on the bills.

A solution is starting to take shape to help shore up the teachers pension system, but the House and Senate remain divided on sentencing guidelines in the heroin bill.

Lawmakers have until 11:59 p.m. Tuesday to pass laws.

Heroin

Representatives and senators were still at odds Friday afternoon over needle exchanges, sentencing guidelines for heroin traffickers, and whether to include a “good Samaritan” clause that would provide immunity to those who report heroin overdoses.

Senate President Robert Stivers repeatedly suggested that the committee stop arguing and produce a bill that only includes points that lawmakers agree on: making overdose-reversing drug naloxone more available and increasing funding for treatment programs.

Kentucky LRC

Kentucky lawmakers say they’ve come a long way in coming up with a legislative solution to the state’s heroin epidemic, but no consensus has emerged on the biggest sticking point—how to punish heroin traffickers.

The House wants to keep the state’s current law that gives low-level heroin traffickers lighter prison sentences. The Senate wants strict sentencing across the board.

Sen. Chris McDaniel, a Taylor Mill Republican and candidate for lieutenant governor, said strict sentencing guidelines would still allow prosecutors to use discretion and provide reduced charges for “peddlers.”

“We believe that we need to trust our prosecutors locally to make these decisions and we trust our prosecutors,” he said.

On Thursday, a conference committee made up of six representatives and six senators attempted to hammer out final details of the bill. To get heroin legislation passed in this session, both the state House and Senate would have to vote on a final version of the bill on Monday or Tuesday of next week.

Rep. John Tilley, a Hopkinsville Democrat and author of the House version of the bill, said lawmakers need to “legislate to the bad” prosecutors—to prevent low-level traffickers and addicts from entering the prison system.

Tilley said current law already has tough penalties for traffickers, and he pointed out that low-level drug dealers would receive a Class C felony if they received a second trafficking offense.

Senators also took issue with a House proposal to add $10 million dollars for drug treatment to the bill.

Senate President Robert Stivers, a Manchester Republican, said House lawmakers need to identify the source for the additional funding.

“I think we all have to take a realistic look: where are those monies coming from,” Stivers asked.

The provision for additional money had been proposed by Rep. Sannie Overly, a Paris Democrat and candidate for lieutenant governor.

Kevin Willis

The Kentucky General Assembly adjourned late Wednesday night for a week and a half while Gov. Steve Beshear considers vetoes—and no bill addressing the state’s rising heroin problems had been passed.

Lawmakers will have two days to pass a final bill: March 23 and 24.

Both chambers have selected members for a conference committee, which will now try to hammer out the final details of a compromise.

Senate President Robert Stivers remains confident that a heroin bill will be finalized over the course of the break.

“I think the discussions when we come back everything would be resolved by that time, because when we get back on the 23rd and 24th I think the die will be cast and hopefully everything will be prepared,” Stivers said.

The starting point of discussion will be a bill sponosored Rep. John Tilley, a Hopkinsville Democrat, who has worked with House and Senate leader to come up with a compromise piece of legislation.

“It represents some advancement in the progress that we’ve had in meeting with our Senate counterparts over the last several weeks,” Tilley said during a House Floor speech on Wednesday.

The bill looks a lot like a version the House passed last month: it would punish heroin traffickers with increasing penalties depending on how much of the drug they have, and it would allow local health districts to set up needle exchanges.

Kevin Willis

Several Kentucky legislators on Friday spoke against a provision in the House’s heroin bill that would allow local health districts to start needle exchanges—but the chamber unanimously passed the bill.

“Maybe giving free needles for people to use illicit drugs sends an equally bad impression to our youth,” said Rep. Stan Lee, a Republican from Lexington.

Rep. Addia Wuchner, a Republican from Florence, proposed removing the needle exchange provision so it could be vetted by committee.

But the sponsor of the bill, Rep. John Tilley, a Democrat from Hopkinsville, said needle exchanges are often the first point of contact between addicts and those who can help them recover.

The needle exchange provision was ultimately included in the bill.

The Kentucky House of Representatives now has its own version of a bill that seeks to combat the state’s heroin epidemic.

There are a few key distinctions between the House proposal revealed Monday and the bill that passed the Kentucky Senate earlier this year, including a provision that would allow local health districts to set up needle exchange programs. Needle exchanges have been a major hang-up for Senate Republicans in the past.

Rep. John Tilley, a Democrat from Hopkinsville, said a needle exchange program can be the first point of contact between addicts and people who can help.

“We are at wit’s end in the state, and for the country for that matter, to find things that will actually work, that will actually reduce drug-use that actually will get addicts into treatment, will break the cycle of addiction,” Tilley said.

The Kentucky Senate passed a bill on the third day of the legislative session last month, but the House has yet to produce a bill this session addressing the state’s heroin problem.

House Speaker Greg Stumbo, a Democrat from Prestonsburg, on Tuesday said he has issues with the upper chamber’s version—specifically, the bill’s provision to fund treatment programs.

“The Senate [version of the bill] spent money—and nobody is against rehabilitation—but the Senate spent money that wasn’t really there, and it’s kind of a bit of a false promise, I’m afraid,” Stumbo said

Bill Would Let Overdose Victims Avoid Prosecution

Nov 21, 2014
Kentucky LRC

Republican lawmakers have proposed a bill that would allow some people who overdose on heroin or witness an overdose to avoid charges if they immediately seek help from public safety officials.

Republican state Sen. Chris McDaniel, who is sponsoring the bill, said during a press conference in Covington on Friday that it is an attempt to combat the state's growing heroin addiction problem.

Heroin overdose deaths now account for 32 percent of the state's drug overdose deaths, up from 20 percent in 2012. Northern Kentucky has seen largest increase in overdose heroin deaths.

The bill would also stiffen penalties for heroin traffickers and spend more money on drug treatment programs. A similar bill failed to pass earlier this year despite broad support from both political parties.

Kentucky state Senate Republicans leaders say heroin legislation will rank among their top legislative priorities in 2015.

CN2 Pure Politics reports that GOP Senator Chris McDaniel will be the lead sponsor of the bill, which he says will target drug traffickers while also offering more treatment options to addicts.

Anti-heroin legislation introduced by a Republican lawmaker passed the Senate during this year’s General Assembly, but wasn’t passed by the Democratic-led House. Several lawmakers were concerned about the legality of a provision in the bill that would have charged dealers with murder if someone they sold to overdosed.

Read more stories related to heroin in the commonwealth here.

Heroin has been taking an increasing toll on the Bluegrass State, with the northern Kentucky region especially hard hit. A recent report from the state’s Office of Drug Control Policy shows that while the number of total overdoses remained steady in 2013, deaths caused by heroin increased by more than 12 percent.

Heroin Emerges as an Issue in Kentucky Senate Race

Sep 22, 2014

Kentucky's increasing heroin problem has taken center stage as an issue in political advertising in the state's Senate race.

Democratic candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes' campaign is running radio ads across the state criticizing Republican Mitch McConnell for not taking a stance on a state bill that would've increased penalties for heroin traffickers. The ad says McConnell thinks solutions only come from Washington.

The McConnell campaign called the ad misleading. They noted McConnell was named Federal Legislator of the Year by the Kentucky Narcotics Officers' Association and said McConnell was able to expand a fedral anti-drug trafficking program into Jefferson and Hardin Counties. The program pays officers overtime to investigate drug traffickers.

Heroin overdose deaths in Kentucky increased to 230 in 2013 from 22 in 2011, a 945% increase in just two years.

A state Senator and Representative from Hopkinsville are among a small group of lawmakers working to craft new legislation aimed at curbing the state’s rising problem with heroin.

Senate Judiciary Chair Whitney Westerfield and House Judiciary Chair John Tilley are helping to create a bill they hope can pass the 2015 General Assembly. A bill introduced in this year’s session failed because of concerns over a part of the measure that would have allowed prosecutors to charge heroin traffickers with homicide if someone they sold to died from an overdose.

Speaking to CN2’s Pure Politics, Senator Westerfield said a bipartisan group from both the House and Senate believes something needs to be done to strengthen the state’s heroin laws. The Christian County Republican says he wants to see a bill that cracks down on dealers while also increasing treatment options for addicts.

A recent report from Kentucky’s Office of Drug Control Policy showed deaths caused by heroin increased by more than 12 percent in 2013.

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