HIV

Health
2:14 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Heroin Use and Complacency Could Lead to Increase in HIV Cases in Kentucky

Kentucky has seen a rise in heroin abuse in recent years.

Experts who watch HIV and AIDS cases in Kentucky say the rate of infection may see a rise thanks to complacency and the rise of heroin abuse in the state.

In spite of ongoing education and prevention efforts, the rate of infection in the state has remained constant over the past decade in Kentucky.

Mark Royse, executive director of AVOL, told the Lexington Herald-Leader that the infection rate may be on the rise. AVOL serves HIV and AIDS patients in 72 Kentucky counties.

Royse says people believe the disease is a problem in poorer countries, but not the U.S.

He says as heroin use increases in the state, so too do infection problems that arise from sharing needles.

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Health
2:06 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Federal Governnment Halts HIV Clinical Trial that Included Vanderbilt University

A federal HIV vaccine trial that Vanderbilt University  is being halted because of poor results. The nation’s most advanced clinical trial was stopped this week when an independent review discovered that more people who got a vaccine tested positive for HIV than those who received a placebo.

The trial involved 19 cities and had enrolled individuals marketed to people considered at high risk for contracting the virus.

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Health
7:39 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

HIV Testing Bill Unanimously Clears Kentucky House

Bill sponsor Rep. Joni Jenkins (R-Shively)
Credit Kentucky LRC

A bill aimed at allowing victims of sexual assault to ask for quick HIV testing of their alleged attackers has cleared the Kentucky House.

Under current laws, only prosecutors can ask for HIV testing of the accused person, and they can only ask after a conviction. The bill would allow a victim or the prosecutor to ask for such a test before a conviction.

Bill sponsor Joni Jenkins says medical advances can prevent HIV from advancing into AIDS if caught early, but convictions often take up to three years.

"So it's critical for victims to know the offender's HIV status as soon as possible and not wait 1 to 3 years for the completion of trial for such information," said Rep. Jenkins.

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