Indiana

IBM To Appeal Order To Pay Indiana $78 Million

Aug 8, 2017
Creative Commons

IBM says it will appeal a ruling ordering it to pay Indiana $78 million in damages stemming from the company’s failed effort to automate much of the state’s welfare services.

New York-based IBM Corp. says in an email that it worked “diligently and invested significant resources” toward improving Indiana’s system for processing of Indiana’s welfare applications.

Indiana and IBM sued each other in 2010 after then-Gov. Mitch Daniels cancelled the company’s 10-year, $1.3 billion contract following numerous complaints.

Philip Kirby says he first used heroin during a stint in a halfway house a few years ago, when he was 21 years old. He quickly formed a habit.

"You can't really dabble in it," he says.

Late last year, Kirby was driving with drugs and a syringe in his car when he got pulled over. He went to jail for a few months on a separate charge before entering a drug court program in Hamilton County, Ind., north of Indianapolis. But before Kirby started, he says the court pressured him to get a shot of a drug called Vivitrol.

Alcoa Public Relations

Alcoa Corp. plans to partially reopen its aluminum smelting operations in southwestern Indiana, restoring nearly half of the 600 jobs lost when it shut down the facility along the Ohio River last year.

Alcoa says it will spend about $30 million to restart three of five smelter lines at its Warrick Operations near Evansville, where its rolling mill makes aluminum for food and beverage packaging.

The Pittsburgh-based company closed the smelter in March of 2016, but now expects production to resume during spring of 2018.

Several weeks before President Trump nominated Indiana's state health commissioner Jerome Adams to be the next U.S. Surgeon General, Adams toured the Salvation Army Harbor Light detox center in Indianapolis, Ind., the only treatment facility in the state for people without insurance.

Creative Commons

A federal judge sounded skeptical of a new Indiana abortion law Tuesday while hearing a request to block parts of the law that will make it tougher for girls under age 18 to get an abortion without their parents' knowledge.

U.S. District Court Judge Sarah Evans Barker heard arguments on a preliminary injunction being sought by Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky and the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana.

The groups sued Indiana officials on May 18, seeking to block some provisions of the new law, and saying they would create "an unconstitutional undue burden on unemancipated minors."

Thinkstock

A federal judge is set to hear arguments in a lawsuit seeking to block a new Indiana law that makes it tougher for girls under age 18 to get an abortion without their parents' knowledge.

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky say portions of the new law are unconstitutional.

A judge in Indianapolis will hear arguments Tuesday from Planned Parenthood's attorneys and attorneys for the state of Indiana.

Under current Indiana law, girls under 18 must either get their parents' consent to have an abortion or seek a judge's permission.

Rogerd/WikimediaCommons

Indiana state lawmakers have returned to their districts after adjourning the 2017 General Assembly early Saturday.

The Republican-led legislature met a goal set by GOP leaders to pass an ambitious plan to improve Indiana’s roads and bridges.

Indiana Public Broadcasting Statehouse reporter Brandon Smith said the plan will eventually raise $1.2 billion annually through an increase in the fuel tax and motor vehicle fees.

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

Vice President Mike Pence is asking the Indiana Supreme Court to let him keep secret some documents emailed to him while he was the state's governor.

The request comes after an Indianapolis lawyer earlier this month sought the overturning of a state appeals court decision denying access to emails sent to Pence in 2014 in which a staffer for Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott outlined a legal strategy for challenging then-President Barack Obama's executive order on immigration.

The appeals court ruled the documents are privileged attorney-client communications.

As Congress weighs repeal of the Affordable Care Act, the home state of Vice President Mike Pence Tuesday sought to keep its conservative-style Medicaid expansion under the federal health the health law.

Evansville Rescue Mission

As bitterly cold temperatures move across our region, a shelter in Evansville, Indiana is giving out some life-saving equipment to the homeless.

It may look like a jacket, but the unique garment doubles as a sleeping bag that protects against severe cold.

Michael Conroy/AP

There has been a lot of talk about how the explosive 2005 video of Donald Trump making vulgar comments about women may drag down Republican Senate candidates. But so far, it's not a game changer in Indiana. Trump is still favored to win the reliably red state, so that means both contenders for the open Senate seat are fighting over Trump supporters. That's an awkward spot for former Sen. Evan Bayh, a Democrat, who has been panned as a Washington insider during this outsider election year.

When Democrats recruited Bayh to jump into the Indiana Senate race in July, they thought it would be an easy win. But in three months, Bayh's commanding double-digit lead has shriveled to a virtual tie against Republican Rep. Todd Young. That's in large part because of the barrage of criticism Bayh is weathering for making a home — and making lots of money — in Washington, D.C., since leaving the Senate.

Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Group

Republicans were already at a massive disadvantage when it came to the 2016 Senate map — defending more than double the number of seats of the Democrats had. To compound matters, many of those endangered Republicans were sitting in swing state territory in a presidential year where the electorate already leans more liberal.

Donald Trump's once-sagging poll numbers rebounded nationally after cratering post-convention. He's doing better now in battlegrounds where he needs to win the White House — and where Republicans are defending their toughest Senate seats — but overall still narrowly lags Hillary Clinton.

Some Republican seats once thought to be sure-wins for Democrats, such as Ohio and Florida, are moving off the table. But now, seats in typically safe GOP turf, such as Indiana and Missouri, are at real risk of flipping. It's a much different path to the majority than either party had expected.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Eric Molina

Indiana’s health commissioner has declared a public health emergency in Southern Indiana’s Clark County that allows local officials to start a needle exchange to curb the spread of hepatitis C and HIV.

Commissioner Dr. Jerome Adams declared the emergency Monday, making the county the sixth in Indiana to win permission for a needle-exchange following an HIV outbreak in Southern Indiana linked to intravenous drug use. The five others are Fayette, Madison, Monroe, Scott and Wayne counties.

Clark County spent eight months trying to work out problems with its initial needle-exchange application. The county submitted a second application after ending talks with the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation to pay for the program.

County health Commissioner Kevin Burke said state health officials didn’t support how that foundation would have funded the program.

Thinkstock

A new poll released Wednesday has good news for Indiana Democrats.

The poll shows Democrat Evan Bayh leading Republican Congressman Todd Young by seven points in the state’s U.S. Senate race.

The Evansville Courier and Press reports Bayh is leading Young 48 percent to 41 percent.

Bayh’s candidacy is especially important to the Democrats nationally in their effort to take control of the Senate.

The Monmouth University poll shows a tight race for governor.

Republican Lieutenant Gov. Eric Holcomb holds a one percentage point lead over Democrat John Gregg.

The poll has a margin of error of nearly five percentage points.

NPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his running mate, Indiana Governor Mike Pence, are attending a fundraiser at a private home in Evansville next week.

Monday’s event is being hosted by businessman Steve Chancellor, the CEO of American Patriot Group, which makes field-ready meals for military personnel.

The Evansville Courier & Press reports Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie of Bowling Green is also scheduled to attend the fundraiser.

The minimum donation for a couple is $10,000. Photo opportunities and access to VIPs will cost more—between $25,000-$250,000.

Trump and Pence are trying to keep Indiana’s 11 electoral college votes in the Republican win category. Republican Mitt Romney beat President Obama by 10 percentage points in 2012.

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