Indiana

CurtisHillforIndiana.com

A special prosecutor will help Indiana's government watchdog investigate allegations that state Attorney General Curtis Hill drunkenly groped a lawmaker and three legislative staffers.

Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry's office filed a motion Tuesday asking a judge to appoint a special prosecutor who would review Inspector General Lori Torres' eventual findings on the allegations against Hill.

Kentucky’s Blocked Medicaid Work Requirement Could Impact Indiana

Jul 9, 2018
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Nearly half a million low-income Kentuckians lost their dental and vision insurance this month after a federal judge halted Kentucky’s Medicaid waiver program.

Kentucky HEALTH, which stands for Helping to Engage and Achieve Long-Term Health, is part of Kentucky’s Medicaid waiver program. Starting in July, it would have required Medicaid recipients to work or volunteer for 20 hours a week to receive full benefits. Students, people with disabilities and pregnant women would be exempt from the work requirement, among others.

Mike Braun Campaign

An independently wealthy businessman who largely self-financed his own campaign has defeated two sitting congressmen to become Indiana’s Republican nominee for Senate.

Republican primary voters picked Mike Braun to challenge Joe Donnelly, who is considered one of the Senate’s most vulnerable Democrats.

Braun ran as an outsider, blasting Reps. Todd Rokita and Luke Messer as “career politicians” who failed to follow through on campaign promises.

Planned Parenthood Sues Indiana Over New Abortion Rules

Apr 24, 2018
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Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is suing Indiana officials over a new law that will require medical providers who treat women for complications arising from abortions to report detailed patient information to the state.

The federal lawsuit filed Monday by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana on Planned Parenthood’s behalf contends the reporting rules and a provision requiring annual inspections of abortion clinics are unconstitutional.

As the Trump administration moves to give states more flexibility in running Medicaid, advocates for the poor are keeping a close eye on Indiana to see whether such conservative ideas improve or harm care.

Indiana in 2015 implemented some of the most radical changes seen to the state-federal program that covers nearly 1 in 4 low-income Americans — including charging some adults a monthly premium and locking out for six months some of those who don't pay their premiums.

Wikimedia Commons

An Indiana Senate committee has overwhelmingly voted down legislation that would have allowed grocery stores, pharmacies and gas stations to sell cold beer.

Indiana is the only state that regulates the temperature at which beer is sold.

Grocery and convenience stores and pharmacies can sell cold wine and warm beer. But the sale of carryout cold beer is primarily limited to liquor stores, whose owners say expanded cold beer sales would force many out of business.

Erica Peterson

It may be nicknamed “The Sunny Side,” but solar installations in Indiana’s Clark and Floyd counties are still few and far between. A group of volunteers is trying to change that, and their push has intensified over the past few months.

At Jeffersonville’s First Presbyterian Church, Tricia Tull points to solar panels on the building’s roof. The church installed 13 kilowatts of solar two years ago, paying about $3 a watt. This year, they added 15 more kilowatts.

IBM To Appeal Order To Pay Indiana $78 Million

Aug 8, 2017
Creative Commons

IBM says it will appeal a ruling ordering it to pay Indiana $78 million in damages stemming from the company’s failed effort to automate much of the state’s welfare services.

New York-based IBM Corp. says in an email that it worked “diligently and invested significant resources” toward improving Indiana’s system for processing of Indiana’s welfare applications.

Indiana and IBM sued each other in 2010 after then-Gov. Mitch Daniels cancelled the company’s 10-year, $1.3 billion contract following numerous complaints.

Philip Kirby says he first used heroin during a stint in a halfway house a few years ago, when he was 21 years old. He quickly formed a habit.

"You can't really dabble in it," he says.

Late last year, Kirby was driving with drugs and a syringe in his car when he got pulled over. He went to jail for a few months on a separate charge before entering a drug court program in Hamilton County, Ind., north of Indianapolis. But before Kirby started, he says the court pressured him to get a shot of a drug called Vivitrol.

Alcoa Public Relations

Alcoa Corp. plans to partially reopen its aluminum smelting operations in southwestern Indiana, restoring nearly half of the 600 jobs lost when it shut down the facility along the Ohio River last year.

Alcoa says it will spend about $30 million to restart three of five smelter lines at its Warrick Operations near Evansville, where its rolling mill makes aluminum for food and beverage packaging.

The Pittsburgh-based company closed the smelter in March of 2016, but now expects production to resume during spring of 2018.

Several weeks before President Trump nominated Indiana's state health commissioner Jerome Adams to be the next U.S. Surgeon General, Adams toured the Salvation Army Harbor Light detox center in Indianapolis, Ind., the only treatment facility in the state for people without insurance.

Creative Commons

A federal judge sounded skeptical of a new Indiana abortion law Tuesday while hearing a request to block parts of the law that will make it tougher for girls under age 18 to get an abortion without their parents' knowledge.

U.S. District Court Judge Sarah Evans Barker heard arguments on a preliminary injunction being sought by Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky and the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana.

The groups sued Indiana officials on May 18, seeking to block some provisions of the new law, and saying they would create "an unconstitutional undue burden on unemancipated minors."

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A federal judge is set to hear arguments in a lawsuit seeking to block a new Indiana law that makes it tougher for girls under age 18 to get an abortion without their parents' knowledge.

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky say portions of the new law are unconstitutional.

A judge in Indianapolis will hear arguments Tuesday from Planned Parenthood's attorneys and attorneys for the state of Indiana.

Under current Indiana law, girls under 18 must either get their parents' consent to have an abortion or seek a judge's permission.

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Indiana state lawmakers have returned to their districts after adjourning the 2017 General Assembly early Saturday.

The Republican-led legislature met a goal set by GOP leaders to pass an ambitious plan to improve Indiana’s roads and bridges.

Indiana Public Broadcasting Statehouse reporter Brandon Smith said the plan will eventually raise $1.2 billion annually through an increase in the fuel tax and motor vehicle fees.

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

Vice President Mike Pence is asking the Indiana Supreme Court to let him keep secret some documents emailed to him while he was the state's governor.

The request comes after an Indianapolis lawyer earlier this month sought the overturning of a state appeals court decision denying access to emails sent to Pence in 2014 in which a staffer for Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott outlined a legal strategy for challenging then-President Barack Obama's executive order on immigration.

The appeals court ruled the documents are privileged attorney-client communications.

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