Jack Conway

Attorney General Jack Conway is advising Kentucky leaders that industrial hemp farming remains illegal in the commonwealth.

Conway issued an advisory letter on Wednesday to Gov. Steve Beshear, Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and others to clarify current law related to hemp. The letter appears to deflate hopes of hemp farming proponents who have said they'd like to begin planting next year.

Kentucky lawmakers have passed legislation that would allow farmers to grow the crop if the federal government ever lifts a longstanding ban. But Attorney General Conway said that ban remains firmly in place.

The state agriculture department recently issued a news release saying it was instructed by the Kentucky Industrial Hemp Commission to begin drawing up regulations for hemp farming in the commonwealth. That came on the heels of comments by Justice Department officials that the federal government had no intention of prosecuting hemp farmers.

Kentucky Attorney General Wants T-Shirts Pulled

Sep 6, 2013

Calling it a "cynical effort" to profit from people who have died from drug abuse, top officials in three states have asked a boutique fashion company to cease selling T-shirts that feature the names of well-known prescription drugs.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi along with the attorneys general of Kentucky and Maine this week sent a letter to Kitson Inc. criticizing the company for selling sport jersey type shirts with the drug names Vicodin, Xanax and Adderall written on the back.

An email to the company — which sells items online and at stores in California — was not immediately returned.

But in a statement posted on the company's Facebook page following a discussion about the shirts on NBC, Kitson contends that the T-shirts are helping create a dialogue about drug abuse.

Kentucky AG Won't Get Involved in Same-Sex Privilege Case

Aug 16, 2013

Kentucky's attorney general is staying out of a dispute on whether a law exempting spouses from testifying against each other applies to same-sex couples.

A judge in Louisville was told by a local prosecutor Friday that Attorney General Jack Conway's office doesn't intend to weigh in on the matter.

Conway's office says the state is adequately represented by the local prosecutor.

The dispute has arisen in the case of Bobbie Joe Clary, who is charged with a 2011 murder.

Prosecutors claim her partner, Geneva Case, heard Clary admit to the killing and argue she must testify because Kentucky doesn't recognize same-sex civil unions or marriages.

The couple joined into a civil union in Vermont. Defense attorneys say that denying them the same marital rights as others would violate the Constitution.

Two of Kentucky's elected leaders are joining their peers in asking a national clothing retailer to stop selling questionable pint and shot glasses.

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway and U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers of Somerset are asking retailer Urban Outfitters to stop selling an array of pint glasses, shot glasses and flasks that are made to look like prescription pill bottles.

The two men have consistently fought for laws to reduce Kentucky's prescription pill epidemic on both the state and federal levels.

In a news release, Conway said the fact that the retailer, which is known for selling ", is encouraging the mixture of alcohol and pills by their branding is even more disturbing.

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway says there is “a good chance” he will run for governor in 2015. Conway has often been mentioned as a possible Democratic candidate to take over the governor’s mansion from two-term incumbent Steve Beshear.

In an interview this week with the editorial board of The Courier-Journal, the 43-year-old Conway also repeated his previous statements that he won’t challenge U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell next year.

Conway, who is finishing his second term as Attorney General, said he won’t “defer to anybody” when making a decision whether or not to run for governor. Other Democrats who have expressed interest in the gubernatorial contest are former state Auditor Crit Luallen, current auditor Adam Edelen, Lt. Gov. Jerry Abramson, and former Lt. Gov. Daniel Mongiardo.

On the GOP side, Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and Second District Congressman Brett Guthrie have often been mentioned as possible candidates.

Kentucky’s attorney general is supporting federal legislation to curb recruiting abuses by for-profit colleges.

Jack Conway and 13 attorneys general are supporting the Protecting Financial Aid for Students and Taxpayers Act sponsored by Sen. Kay R. Hagan (D-NC) and Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA).

The bill restricts colleges and universities from using federal financial aid for recruitment, advertising, and marketing purposes. 

"I support higher education and students who seek a degree to create a better life for their families, but many times I see those dreams turn to nightmares when students fall prey to a fast sales pitch from a for-profit college with a questionable reputation," Conway said. "The students end up with tens of thousands of dollars in debt and no degree."

More than $55.5 million in relief has gone to hundreds of Kentucky homeowners in the national mortgage foreclosure settlement.

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway said in a statement that a recent report from the independent settlement monitor also indicates that mortgage servicers were processing more than $2 million in additional claims for Kentucky borrowers, for a total of $57.5 million.

The statement said the 1,562 borrowers received an average of $35,534. The relief was provided by Ally/GMAC/Bank of America, Citi, Chase and Wells Fargo through Dec. 31.

Conway's office said the information provided by mortgage servicers hasn't been verified by the compliance monitor.

Kentucky Attorney General Sues Maker of Diabetes Drug

Feb 21, 2013

Kentucky's attorney general has sued a drug maker, accusing the company of misleading consumers about a diabetes drug in a state plagued by high rates of the disease.

The suit claims that GlaxoSmithKline overstated the effectiveness of the prescription drug Avandia and hid its risks.

Attorney General Jack Conway says the drug maker claimed that Avandia could reduce cardiovascular risks faced by diabetics. The lawsuit claims the drug actually increases those cardiovascular risks.

The suit filed this week in Franklin County Circuit Court in Frankfort accuses the company of violating the state's Consumer Protection Act. The suit seeks an injunction against the company and civil penalties up to $10,000 per violation.

GSK spokesman Kevin Colgan says the company acted properly in studying and marketing the drug.

Claiming it committed fraud, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway has filed a suit against a mortgage company.

Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, or MERS, provides a marketplace for banks to trade mortgages and mortgage-backed securities.

Conway says it was set up by banks to avoid the fees that must be paid when mortgages are sold and to hide the true owners of those mortgages.

Conway's suit alleges MERS did not pay the proper fees in Kentucky. He's also suing under the Consumer Protection Act, because MERS foreclosed on many homes.

“About 300,000 mortgages in Kentucky are MERS mortgages right now," Conway said. "We are able to fine up to $2,000 per violation of the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act. We have that avenue of damages. And we also have the avenue to go after the recording fees that have been dodged as a result of this mortgage transfer scheme.”

New York, Delaware and Massachusetts have also filed suit against MERS.

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway has sued Spencerian College for allegedly misrepresenting job placement numbers to consumers.

Conway said Wednesday at a news conference in Frankfort that the for-profit school violated the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act by making unfair, false and deceptive statements regarding the hiring rates of its students.

Spencerian operates two Kentucky campuses — one in Lexington and one in Louisville.

Conway says in some cases, Spencerian's advertised rate of job placements was 30 or 40 percent higher than the rates reported to its accreditor.

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