Jack Conway

The mayors of Lexington and Louisville believe Kentucky needs a local option sales tax to stay competitive. The tax is levied temporarily to finance public infrastructure projects, but an opinion issued this week by the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office says voters would first need to approve a constitutional amendment. 

According to the opinion, local governments nor the General Assembly may enact a local option sales tax without changing the state constitution. The Courier-Journal reports the opinion was requested by the Louisville Metro Council. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Lexington Mayor Jim Gray want counties to be able to locally increase the statewide sales tax and use the additional revenue for public projects.  Voters would have to approve the tax and the projects it would fund in a local referendum.

In an opinion issued Monday by Attorney General Jack Conway, the first step would be amending the state constitution.

Jack Conway May Run for Governor

Jan 14, 2013

One of Kentucky's most recognizable political figures is letting other would-be candidates know they may have to get past him if they want to be the state's next governor.

Democratic Attorney General jack Conway told the Associated Press that he's taking "a very, very serious look" at running in the 2015 gubernatorial election, a move that could ward off some potential challengers for his party's nomination to replace incumbent Democrat Steve Beshear.

Three statewide campaigns in the past five years have enhanced Conway's name recognition. Altogether, Conway spent about $10 million in those races, largely on TV advertising that built up his name among voters. Conway had about twice that much spent against him.

A Kentucky appeals court on Friday threw out $30 million in verdicts against two drug makers, concluding that there wasn't any evidence to back claims that the pair inflated prescription drug prices to boost profits from Medicaid.

Kentuckians are being urged to watch their mailboxes for postcards alerting them to a financial settlement. Notices were mailed Monday to more than 5,000 Kentuckians who were foreclosed upon between Jan. 1, 2008, and Dec. 31, 2011, and are now eligible for a share of $10.7 million.

One of Kentucky’s two Democratic Congressmen believes his party has a good shot at unseating U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell in 2014. So far, many of the state’s top Democrats have announced plans to avoid challenging the Senate Minority Leader. That includes Attorney General Jack Conway, who ran for Senate against Rand Paul in 2010, former state Auditor Crit Luallen and current Auditor Adam Edelen.

Two of Kentucky's highest profile Democrats say they are not interested in taking on U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell in 2014. Attorney General Jack Conway, who ran for Senate in 2010 against Republican Rand Paul, tells Kentucky Public Radio he isn't interested in running for the chamber again.

A leading advocate of Kentucky's new prescription pill law says he's ready to listen to doctors who want to change it. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway has made fighting prescription pill abuse one of his top priorities. Earlier this year, he was a leading supporter of House Bill 1, which requires most doctors to use the KASPER pill tracking system.

The attorney general's office will be sponsoring Senior Crime College programs across the state in coming weeks to teach the elderly to protect themselves against fraud, identity theft and a variety of scams. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway said the events are intended to educate seniors about unscrupulous sorts who would cheat them.

Two women who each lost a daughter to prescription drug abuse are becoming the faces of a billboard campaign alerting Kentuckians to the dangers of improperly popping pills. Karen Shay said Thursday she joined in the campaign in hopes of sparing others from her heartbreak.

It appears many of the big political names won't head to West Kentucky's Fancy Farm picnic in a little more than a week. The annual  political picnic is usually a great place for the state’s biggest political names to gather and sling mud.

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