Jack Conway

Kentucky’s attorney general is supporting federal legislation to curb recruiting abuses by for-profit colleges.

Jack Conway and 13 attorneys general are supporting the Protecting Financial Aid for Students and Taxpayers Act sponsored by Sen. Kay R. Hagan (D-NC) and Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA).

The bill restricts colleges and universities from using federal financial aid for recruitment, advertising, and marketing purposes. 

"I support higher education and students who seek a degree to create a better life for their families, but many times I see those dreams turn to nightmares when students fall prey to a fast sales pitch from a for-profit college with a questionable reputation," Conway said. "The students end up with tens of thousands of dollars in debt and no degree."

More than $55.5 million in relief has gone to hundreds of Kentucky homeowners in the national mortgage foreclosure settlement.

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway said in a statement that a recent report from the independent settlement monitor also indicates that mortgage servicers were processing more than $2 million in additional claims for Kentucky borrowers, for a total of $57.5 million.

The statement said the 1,562 borrowers received an average of $35,534. The relief was provided by Ally/GMAC/Bank of America, Citi, Chase and Wells Fargo through Dec. 31.

Conway's office said the information provided by mortgage servicers hasn't been verified by the compliance monitor.

Kentucky Attorney General Sues Maker of Diabetes Drug

Feb 21, 2013

Kentucky's attorney general has sued a drug maker, accusing the company of misleading consumers about a diabetes drug in a state plagued by high rates of the disease.

The suit claims that GlaxoSmithKline overstated the effectiveness of the prescription drug Avandia and hid its risks.

Attorney General Jack Conway says the drug maker claimed that Avandia could reduce cardiovascular risks faced by diabetics. The lawsuit claims the drug actually increases those cardiovascular risks.

The suit filed this week in Franklin County Circuit Court in Frankfort accuses the company of violating the state's Consumer Protection Act. The suit seeks an injunction against the company and civil penalties up to $10,000 per violation.

GSK spokesman Kevin Colgan says the company acted properly in studying and marketing the drug.

Claiming it committed fraud, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway has filed a suit against a mortgage company.

Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, or MERS, provides a marketplace for banks to trade mortgages and mortgage-backed securities.

Conway says it was set up by banks to avoid the fees that must be paid when mortgages are sold and to hide the true owners of those mortgages.

Conway's suit alleges MERS did not pay the proper fees in Kentucky. He's also suing under the Consumer Protection Act, because MERS foreclosed on many homes.

“About 300,000 mortgages in Kentucky are MERS mortgages right now," Conway said. "We are able to fine up to $2,000 per violation of the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act. We have that avenue of damages. And we also have the avenue to go after the recording fees that have been dodged as a result of this mortgage transfer scheme.”

New York, Delaware and Massachusetts have also filed suit against MERS.

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway has sued Spencerian College for allegedly misrepresenting job placement numbers to consumers.

Conway said Wednesday at a news conference in Frankfort that the for-profit school violated the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act by making unfair, false and deceptive statements regarding the hiring rates of its students.

Spencerian operates two Kentucky campuses — one in Lexington and one in Louisville.

Conway says in some cases, Spencerian's advertised rate of job placements was 30 or 40 percent higher than the rates reported to its accreditor.

The mayors of Lexington and Louisville believe Kentucky needs a local option sales tax to stay competitive. The tax is levied temporarily to finance public infrastructure projects, but an opinion issued this week by the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office says voters would first need to approve a constitutional amendment. 

According to the opinion, local governments nor the General Assembly may enact a local option sales tax without changing the state constitution. The Courier-Journal reports the opinion was requested by the Louisville Metro Council. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Lexington Mayor Jim Gray want counties to be able to locally increase the statewide sales tax and use the additional revenue for public projects.  Voters would have to approve the tax and the projects it would fund in a local referendum.

In an opinion issued Monday by Attorney General Jack Conway, the first step would be amending the state constitution.

Jack Conway May Run for Governor

Jan 14, 2013

One of Kentucky's most recognizable political figures is letting other would-be candidates know they may have to get past him if they want to be the state's next governor.

Democratic Attorney General jack Conway told the Associated Press that he's taking "a very, very serious look" at running in the 2015 gubernatorial election, a move that could ward off some potential challengers for his party's nomination to replace incumbent Democrat Steve Beshear.

Three statewide campaigns in the past five years have enhanced Conway's name recognition. Altogether, Conway spent about $10 million in those races, largely on TV advertising that built up his name among voters. Conway had about twice that much spent against him.

A Kentucky appeals court on Friday threw out $30 million in verdicts against two drug makers, concluding that there wasn't any evidence to back claims that the pair inflated prescription drug prices to boost profits from Medicaid.

Kentuckians are being urged to watch their mailboxes for postcards alerting them to a financial settlement. Notices were mailed Monday to more than 5,000 Kentuckians who were foreclosed upon between Jan. 1, 2008, and Dec. 31, 2011, and are now eligible for a share of $10.7 million.

One of Kentucky’s two Democratic Congressmen believes his party has a good shot at unseating U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell in 2014. So far, many of the state’s top Democrats have announced plans to avoid challenging the Senate Minority Leader. That includes Attorney General Jack Conway, who ran for Senate against Rand Paul in 2010, former state Auditor Crit Luallen and current Auditor Adam Edelen.

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