James Comey

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin doesn’t want to share his thoughts on President Donald Trump’s decision to fire former FBI Director James Comey.

After a press event Friday at the Muhammad Ali Center in downtown Louisville, Bevin avoided answering questions related to national politics — including Comey’s firing and a recent directive from U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to roll back some of his predecessors’ prosecution policies.

Bevin traveled to Louisville to make an announcement about a championship boxing match in Freedom Hall scheduled for later this year. He joined Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and former heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield for the announcement at the Ali Center.

Rich Girard/Creative Commons

In the wake of President Trump’s firing of FBI director James Comey, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says a special prosecutor is not needed to investigate Russia’s interference in last year’s presidential election.

Democrats — including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and Congressman John Yarmuth of Kentucky — ramped up calls for an independent investigation into Russia’s meddling after Comey’s abrupt removal.

On the Senate Floor, McConnell dismissed the requests.

“Today we’ll no doubt hear calls for a new investigation, which could only serve to impede the current work being done,” McConnell said.

A letter sent to Kentucky Senator Rand Paul from the FBI says the bureau has used domestic drones for surveillance in ten cases since 2006. The letter came in response to a series of questions Sen. Paul asked the FBI regarding its drone use.

Sen. Paul says he will maintain a hold on the nomination of James Comey to be the next FBI Director. Senators can place holds on Presidential nominations, something that is often done to draw attention to a specific issue.

Paul says the FBI’s answers to his questions about domestic drone use are “insufficient”. The Bowling Green Republican has sent the bureau a follow-up letter with more questions.

Politico reports that in its response to Paul, the FBI says the agency has used domestic drones for surveillance in the U.S. in eight criminal cases and two national security cases since 2006.

Kentucky’s junior U.S. Senator says he will put a hold on James Comey’s nomination as FBI director. Bowling Green Republican Rand Paul wants the agency to answer questions regarding the use of drones for domestic surveillance.

Speaking on Fox News, Paul said his intention was not to defeat Comey’s nomination, but to “slow it down enough” to get answers from the Obama administration about drones monitoring American citizens on U.S. soil. Paul says until he gets those answers, he will place a formal hold on Comey’s nomination, a tactic that any Senator can use to prevent a nomination from moving forward.

In March, Paul held a 13-hour talking filibuster of CIA Director John Brennan’s nomination over similar concerns over domestic drone use.

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is telling FBI director Robert Mueller that he will object to the nomination of his successor until he gets answers on domestic drone use.

In a letter this week to Director Mueller, Senator Paul turns up the heat for an explanation of how the FBI uses surveillance drones on U.S. soil.  

“The American people have a right to know the limits that the federal government operates under when using these drones, and whether further action is needed to protect the rights of innocent Americans," writes Paul.

The letter is a follow-up to a previous letter sent on June 20 that asked for a response by July 1.  Senator Paul states in his latest correspondence that until he gets adequate answers to his questions, the Kentucky Republican will object to the nomination of James Comey as the next FBI director and encourage his colleagues to the do the same. 

Drone use is a hot-button issue for Paul, who in March, filibustered for 13 hours the nomination of CIA Director John Brennan over the use of domestic drones.