KTRS

Education
2:45 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

General Counsel: New State Budget Doesn't Fix Pension Woes for Kentucky Teachers

The $20 billion budget passed by Kentucky lawmakers underfunds teachers’ pensions, giving the system hundreds of millions of dollars less than requested to keep it afloat.

Public school teachers in Kentucky don’t get Social Security benefits. They can’t even claim their spouses’ either. So that makes their pensions all the more important. 

But the already tight-as-a-snare-drum budget passed by lawmakers continues to underfund the Kentucky Teachers Retirement System by about half the amount they need to bring the system -- which is currently about $13 billion short -- into the black.

Beau Barnes is general counsel for the KTRS. He says that changes in federal accounting laws will only compound the problem.

“The sooner the funding issue can be addressed, the better, because the longer it takes, the more difficult it’s going to be to address because the funding status will continue to decline,” said Barnes.  “The GASB accounting measure of unfunded liability would have the pension fund running out of money in about 2036.”

Barnes says he’s optimistic the situation won’t come to that, and is looking forward to working with the governor and the legislature to address a problem to which, so far, they’ve given little more than lip service.

Politics
2:28 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Former Kentucky Pension Trustee Sounding Alarm on Funding Shortfalls Facing KERS, KTRS

The cover of Chris Tobe's book, Kentucky Fried Pensions

Chris Tobe's interview with WKU Public Radio about the harsh reality facing Kentucky's pension programs

Chris Tobe is a man who is currently playing the role of “bearer of bad news.”

He worked as a trustee with the Kentucky Retirement Systems from 2008 to 2012, where he got an up-close-and-personal look at how the state’s pension systems were being underfunded. Tobe is also the author of the book Kentucky Fried Pensions, and he makes presentations around the state detailing the crisis facing the commonwealth’s pension programs.

While Gov. Steve Beshear and state lawmakers from both parties have hailed pension reform efforts passed in 2013, Tobe says it’s a drop in the bucket compared to what is needed to fix the underfunding issue.

Compared to the rest of the nation, Tobe believes “Kentucky is probably second worst to Illinois” when it comes to the health of its public pension programs.

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