Louisville

Arts & Culture
3:56 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

New Movie Marks Kentuckian's Directorial Debut

From left: Caitlin Nicol-Thomas, writer/director Richie Ramsey, Alan Powell, Ali Faulkner
City on a Hill

A new movie called The Song comes out in theaters Friday. The film is the first full-length feature directed by Bowling Green native Richie Ramsey.

The Song is said to be inspired by the Song of Solomon, so it's no surprise the film about a singer-songwriter is heavy with religious imagery. One of the first conversations between main characters Jed King and Rose Jordan involves a debate over a popular song from the 1960s that's based on biblical text.

Jed: I love that song too, it’s just not the Beatles.
Rose: Yeah it is.
Jed: No it’s the Byrds, you’re thinking of the Byrds.
Rose: No. Agree to disagree.
Jed: No, you’d still be wrong.
Rose: The lyrics are in the Bible. Can we agree that God wrote them?

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Regional
5:15 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

JCTA, Louisville Educators Clash Over Underfunded Teachers' Pension

Jefferson County Teacher's Association president Brent McKim; Louisville League of Women Voters president Pat Murrell; pension expert Chris Tobe
Credit Jonathan Meador

Louisville educators who support a lawsuit seeking to recoup lost money from Kentucky's underfunded teachers' pension system clashed this week with the head of the Jefferson County teachers' union.

The Kentucky Teachers' Retirement System serves about 145,000 teachers across the state and is underfunded by about $14 billion, largely because the state legislature hasn't in recent years provided the necessary contributions to keep it solvent. New state pension accounting standards to be enacted starting this year will compound that $14 billion liability, raising it to about $22 billion.

The issue was at the center of a panel discussion Monday in Louisville that included Jefferson County Teachers Association President Brent McKim and Chris Tobe, a state pension expert and former Kentucky Retirement Systems board member.

If the legislature fails to take action, the pensions could enter a "death spiral"  where it may not be able to make sufficient investments or meet its obligations to pensioners, Tobe and McKim said.

Some, including Tobe, estimate that could happen by 2036.

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Transportation
2:30 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

Federal Appeals Court Rejects Lawsuit Over Ohio River Bridges Project

An artist's rendering of the new Ohio River Bridges project in Louisville and southern Indiana.
Credit Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

A federal appeals court is upholding the dismissal of a lawsuit related to the Louisville-Southern Indiana Ohio River Bridges project.

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati ruled unanimously that the organization that brought the lawsuit failed to prove that Kentucky and Indiana violated federal law. The group Coalition for Advancement of Regional Transportation—or CART—filed suit against the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, the Indiana Department of Transportation, and the Federal Highway Administration.

The group claimed the $2.6 billion dollar bridges project would cause environmental damage by clearing trees and harming wildlife and water quality along the two spans' proposed routes. The suit also said the project violated the 1964 Civil Rights Act by negatively impacting minority communities where construction would occur.  

CART’s lawsuit had been previously dismissed by U.S District Judge John G. Heyburn. The group appealed, setting up the showdown at the federal appeals court level.

The Ohio River bridges project includes the creation of a new bridge for I-65 north, the renovation of the Kennedy Memorial bridge that carries I-65 south, and a new bridge that will connect the Gene Snyder Freeway with the Lee Hamilton Highway in southern Indiana.

Sports
5:13 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

PGA Championship Expected To Be Perry's Last Hurrah

This week's PGA championship in Louisville is expected to be the last for Franklin resident Kenny Perry before he joins the Championship Tour
Credit KennyPerry.com

This week’s PGA Championship at Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville will likely be the last appearance in any of golf’s major competitions by Kenny Perry. The longtime Franklin, Kentucky resident is expected to begin focusing on the Champions Tour for golfers 50 and over.

Valhalla was the site of one of the biggest heartbreaks of Kenny Perry’s playing career.    He finished second in a playoff to Mark Brooks in the 1996 PGA Championship. But 12 years later there was triumph,  as Perry’s Ryder Cup team defeated the Europeans at Valhalla.

Now 54, Perry says he’s grateful for the chance to play in the PGA Championship a final time….in Kentucky. 

Perry spent about an hour signing autographs after his Tuesday practice round.     He says the attention is not a distraction from his preparations.   Perry joked that he hasn’t had to sign all that many autographs over the years.

“To me, it’s my way to say thank you for 30 years of support, thank you for your love and your compassion for me,” said Perry. “I enjoyed it, for me personally.  There were a lot of people yelling out where they were from---Glasgow, Kentucky, Bowling Green, Kentucky—just all these little towns that are around Franklin where I live”

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Sports
4:31 am
Tue August 5, 2014

Tiger Woods May Pull Out of Louisville Tournament

The agent for Tiger Woods says it's still too early for doctors to decide whether the 14-time major champion can compete in the PGA Championship at Valhalla in Louisville this week.

Woods withdrew from the Bridgestone Invitational Sunday after jarring his surgically-repaired back while playing an awkward shot on the par 5 second hole.

The Bridgestone Invitational was only his third tournament since returning from a three month absence following back surgery in March.

Regional
2:16 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Religious Coalition Protests 'Misleading' Anti-Abortion Claims

A pro-choice religious group says a Kentucky-based abortion counseling center is using misleading tactics to dissuade women from getting the procedure.

The Kentucky Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice led 40 protesters over the weekend in a demonstration against downtown Louisville’s  “A Woman’s Choice Resource Center.”  KRCRC president Caitlin Willenbrink says the counseling center is one of 100 similar faith-based anti-abortion organizations that use false science .

“They also give out a lot of information that isn’t credible, like information that draws a link between abortion and breast cancer or abortion and mental health issues,” said Willenbrink. “That’s not supported by credible science.”

Willenbrink designed the protest, she says, to draw attention to the issue in advance of the National Right-to-Life Conference, which will be held at the Kentucky International Convention Center this weekend.

Regional
2:09 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

Contractor Hired To Tear Down Well-known Silos

The silos along I-65 will come down by October
Credit flickr

A Louisville landmark will be coming down with the hiring of a contractor to demolish 22 concrete silos that spell out University of Louisville.

The UofL Foundation said Friday it has hired a demolition firm to begin work to clear the site along Interstate 65.

The school says the winning bidder submitted the lowest proposed price of $687,800 for the project.

The firm will remove the silos and several smaller structures on the 15-acre site.

UofL's foundation purchased the property for $3.3 million from Solae Co., a DuPont subsidiary, last December.

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Regional
4:26 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Hillary Clinton Speaks to Louisville Methodists

Hillary Rodhan Clinton speaks to United Methodists Saturday in Louisville
Credit Kentucky News Network photo

Hillary Rodham Clinton told a conference of Methodist women Saturday about how her own faith was shaped by her devout grandmother. Clinton said she has vivid memories of having her hair braided as a young girl and listening to her grandmother sing hymns.

Clinton spoke of the faith instilled in her by her grandmother and how that helped guide some of the initiatives she started at the State Department. They included efforts to fight human trafficking and promote maternal health care in developing countries.

Clinton mostly steered clear of politics during what turned out to be an intimate speech.

In her introduction, the United Methodists pointed out Clinton was so pleased to be invited to keynote the conference, she declined the church's usual payment and paid her own travel to Louisville and her accommodations.

Regional
1:45 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Kentucky State Fair Sees Attendance Increase

Attendance at this year's Kentucky State Fair saw an increase over 2012
Credit Kentucky State Fair

The Kentucky State Fair finished its 11-day run with a flourish.  The final day of the fair drew 9,000 more fairgoers than the last day in 2012.  That helped push attendance for this year’s fair to 615,648, a slight increase from last year. 

“The response we heard was tremendous,” said Clifford “Rip” Rippetoe, the president and CEO of the State Fair board. “We introduced some positive changes to the Fair this year and heard encouraging feedback to build on.”

Changes this year in Louisville included free weekend parking at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium and concerts on the field at Old Cardinal Stadium.

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Arts & Culture
8:30 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Speed Art Museum Gets $18 Million for Expansion

The Speed Art Museum in Louisville could complete its expansion and renovation five to 10 years early thanks to an $18 million donation.

The Courier-Journal reports work already has begun the project that will double the exhibition space and dramatically change the look of Kentucky's largest museum.

The new donation comes from the family of Brown-Forman Chairman Owsley Brown II. Before Brown's death in 2011, he served as chairman of the museum's building committee and honorary chairman of the capital campaign, which was raising money for the expansion.

Museum board president Allan Latts said the donation will allow the museum to shave $20 million off the project's original $79 million budget because of the lower cost of materials and labor.

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