Louisville

WFPL

Louisville Metro government is suing the country’s three largest opioid distribution companies: Cardinal Health, AmerisourceBergen and McKesson.

Mayor Greg Fischer and Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell announced the federal lawsuit Monday morning.

A Bowling Green clinic that evaluates potential organ transplant patients will not be impacted by the decision to put Jewish Hospital in Louisville up for sale.

The Bowling Green Jewish Hospital Trager Transplant Center outreach clinic opened in June. Jewish Hospital is the second largest organ transplants locations in the state, and is being sold by its parent company--KentuckyOne Health. David Lewis is the director of transplant services at Jewish Hospital.

Alexandra Kanik

Many towns and cities across the Ohio Valley try to improve their business environment with tax breaks, site development, and other incentives. But how about investing in compassion? A growing body of science points to compassion as an economic driver and more businesses and cities around the region are willing to give compassion a chance.

Kentucky Hotel Says it Was to Host Events that Pulled Out

Jul 9, 2017
Creative Commons

A Kentucky hotel would have hosted two conventions that reportedly pulled out of negotiations due to California's state-funded travel ban, the hotel's general manager said.

"We received calls from each convention withdrawing from negotiations due to the California ban," Omni Louisville Hotel General Manager Scott Stuckey said in a release Saturday. "We have used discretion in discussing the issue and have not identified the conventions, in hopes that we could persuade them to do business with Omni and Louisville in the future."

Former Kentucky Attorney General Dave Armstrong Dies at 75

Jun 15, 2017
WFPL

Dave Armstrong, a former Kentucky attorney general whose long public career included helping guide the state's largest city and its most populous county toward a merged government, died Thursday after battling an illness. He was 75.

Armstrong, a Democrat, was a fixture in Louisville politics for years, first as a two-term Jefferson County judge-executive and then during a term as Louisville's mayor.

His death was confirmed by Mike Poole, a funeral director at Pearson Funeral Home in Louisville, which is handling arrangements.

In recent years, Armstrong had battled myasthenia gravis, a physically debilitating disease.

Flickr/Creative Commons

For one week last spring, as Louisville led the world in mourning Muhammad Ali's death and celebrating his life, not a single person died in a hail of gunfire in the boxing great's hometown.

 

The silence was welcome in a city wrestling with an explosion of violence. Leaders hoped the cease-fire might stick — that the send-off for The Champ would mark a turning point, a city-wide reckoning with its failure to live up to Ali's legacy of respect for all human life.

 

But before sunrise the day after Ali's memorial service, shots rang out and a 20-year-old woman was dead. Then another murder. And another, resuming an extraordinary outbreak of bloodshed that has devastated Ali's hometown.

Jacob Ryan

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin believes prayer, coupled with community block walks, can help reduce violent crime in Louisville.

He pushed the importance of both during an event organized by his office Thursday at Western Middle School in Russell — a neighborhood that’s accounted for more shootings than any other this year.

“We’ve seen throughout history, biblical history and world history, the power of prayer,” he said.

The event came in response to a fatal shooting earlier this month, in which a 7-year-old boy was struck by a stray bullet while he sat inside his home.

Owners of Ali's Boyhood Home Warn of Possible Closing

May 31, 2017
Kent Gavin/Getty Images

The owners who restored Muhammad Ali's boyhood home in Kentucky and opened it as a museum say it may have to close because of financial difficulties.

The pink home where Ali — known then as Cassius Clay — dreamed of boxing greatness has drawn more than 10,000 visitors since opening last year in Louisville.

Co-owners George Bochetto and Jared Weiss said Tuesday they have asked the city of Louisville and the Ali Center to help support the landmark.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL News

President Donald Trump will host a rally at Freedom Hall in Louisville Monday.

The event comes as the White House continues to pitch the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

A Gallup poll released over the weekend shows the president’s approval rating hitting a new low. According to the poll of 1,500 adults across the country, 37 percent approve of the job Trump is doing as president compared to 58 percent who disapprove.

Concerns over the repeal and replace plan have mounted after the Congressional Budget Office predicted that 24 million people would lose health coverage over the next decade under the proposal.

J. Tyler Franklin

Despite protests from Louisville Democrats, a state Senate committee on Thursday passed a bill that would tinker with the way the city’s Metro Council operates.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer had a mixed response to policies in the legislation, but called the process by which the bill has been negotiated an “insult to the people of Louisville.”

“There are good things with the bill, there are bad things with the bill,” Fischer said. “There’s unfunded mandates in the bill, there’s tremendously increased workloads in the bill as well. That’s not the primary issue to me, the issue is the citizens of Louisville should have a voice in any changes that takes place to their government.”

Ohio River Bridges Project

Tolling on the two new Ohio River bridges and the Kennedy Bridge is set to begin Dec. 30, officials with the bridges project announced on Tuesday.

The tolled bridges include both the new Abraham Lincoln Bridge and the East End Bridge, as well as the renovated Kennedy. Tolls will run from $2 to $12 for drivers.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Dimitris Kalogeropoylos

Louisville has been chosen for a federal pilot program aimed at attacking the city’s heroin and prescription opioid problem.

The program, led by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, is called the “360 Strategy.” It takes a multi-faceted approach to the problem and will involve law enforcement, medical and public health organizations and service groups.

It will include the formation of a Heroin Investigation Team, made up of Louisville Metro Police detectives and DEA agents.

U.S. Attorney John Kuhn said the team will investigate overdoses as crime scenes. Dealers whose drugs cause overdoses will be prosecuted in federal court and could go to prison for 20 years to life without parole, he said.

“Today, we have a message for heroin dealers,” Kuhn said. “You are killing people in this city, and we cannot allow this to continue.”

Flickr/Creative Commons/Dimitris Kalogeropoylos

Elizabeth Boccieri has been using meth and oxycontin in the past few days, ever since she heard about extra-strength laced heroin that’s been making its way south from Ohio to Louisville.

Law enforcement officials are worried that heroin laced with poison finally reached Louisville this week. Twenty-eight people have been hospitalized with suspected heroin overdoses in Louisville in the past three days, according to local hospitals. One died on Wednesday.

And while it will take weeks to for officials to determine whether the heroin is laced through toxicology testing, it’s what’s on virtually everyone’s mind who encounters the drug in some way.

“My mom is, like, begging me to not use heroin,” the 29-year-old Boccieri said. “There’s bad stuff going around. And so I’m trying to stay away from it.”

Two weeks ago, Boccieri ended her fifth stint in jail this year for heroin-related charges, she said. For 49 days, she detoxed from heroin and other drugs. But after doing hard drugs for almost half of her 29 years, the habit has become her life. She is back to living on friends couches and doing drugs.

Rick Howlett, WFPL News

General Electric’s Louisville-based appliance division has a new owner.

GE Appliances is now part of the China-based Haier Company. The multibillion-dollar sale was finalized on Monday.

About 6,000 people work at Louisville’s Appliance Park, which was constructed by GE more than 60 years ago. The division will now be called “GE Appliances, a Haier Company.”

Chip Blankenship will continue as president and CEO. He said employees should not expect any major shakeups under the new owner.

Confederate Statue At U of L To Be Removed

Apr 29, 2016
Jacob Ryan

Mayor Greg Fischer and University of Louisville President James Ramsey announced Friday the Confederate statue on U of L’s Belknap campus will be removed.

Ramsey, via Twitter, said the monument would be removed immediately. “It is time for U of L to step forward in partnership with the city of Louisville to remove the monument…in respect of all people.”

Ramsey said a campus diversity committee recommended the university remove the statue.

The removal of the Confederate monument will also be the first tangible action for reworking the Third Street corridor near the entrance to the recently opened Speed Art Museum, Ramsey said.

Pages