lung cancer

A first-of-its-kind collaboration in Kentucky is aimed at detecting lung cancer earlier and increasing survivorship rates.

The $7 million effort announced Wednesday in Frankfort is being funded through a grant made by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation.

The effort is called the Kentucky LEADS Collaborative, and is a joint effort between the Universities of Louisville and Kentucky, and the Lung Cancer Alliance. Lung cancer takes an especially heavy toll in the commonwealth, as the state leads the nation in the number of lung cancer cases.

The collaboration will bring together health experts tasked with creating new ways to detect lung cancer at earlier stages in order to increase survivorship. Another goal is to improve the quality of life of lung cancer patients and their caregivers.

A new study shows an increase in lung cancer deaths among Tennessee women who began smoking in the 1960s and 70s. Researchers point out women smokers became much more socially acceptable during that era.

New technology being unveiled in Louisville will offer faster and more accurate treatment for lung cancer patients. The TrueBeam machine allows doctors to deliver radiation more accurately to tumors in the lungs. University of Louisville radiation oncologist Dr. Neal Dunlap says TrueBeam offers two ways for doctors to more accurately see what's going on inside a cancer patient.