Medicaid

Struggling Medicaid operator Kentucky Spirit has followed through and is suing to end its contract with the state. Kentucky Spirit announced last week it was leaving the commonwealth, because it could not operate without massive losses.  Now, it is suing in Frankfort courts to make it official.

The departure of one of three statewide Medicaid operators next year is once again raising concerns about adequate medical coverage in parts of the state. Earlier this year, coverage was one of the issues brought up between Coventry Cares, another operator, and hospital chain Appalachian Regional Healthcare in a lawsuit over contract issues.

As the fallout continues from the announced departure of statewide Medicaid operator Kentucky Spirit, many other Medicaid operators are already looking to take their place. Kentucky Spirit announced last week they would break their contract with the state early. State officials say they won’t re-open those statewide contracts to replace Kentucky Spirit until the current contracts expire.

Members of a Christians-only health insurance plan that has been ordered to cease operations in Kentucky should get different policies immediately, the state Department of Insurance advised. The move follows Franklin County Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate's ruling earlier this month that Medi-Share, a Florida-based cost-sharing ministry, can't operate in Kentucky because it doesn't meet the state's insurance code.

The CEO of a major Medicaid managed care company (MCO) is criticizing Kentucky for the way the state deals with businesses like his. Michael Neidorff is the CEO of Centene, which operates Kentucky Spirit, one of three statewide MCOs that has managed Medicaid patients for the state since last year.

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