Medicaid

A progressive economic group says Kentucky should expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act based on recently release Census data. The Kentucky Center for Economic Policy points to data that shows the percentage of Kentuckians without insurance dropped last year based on early elements of the health care law.

Kentuckians on Medicaid now have the opportunity to change healthcare providers for the first time in months. Open enrollment for all of the state except Louisville started Monday. It's the first time since Medicaid was privatized that residents can choose a new private operator to handle their care.

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services has apologized to a federal judge and is asking him to drop a contempt order against the agency. U.S. Senior Judge Karl Forester held the agency in contempt last month after ruling that the cabinet did not comply with his order to process thousands of requests from Appalachian Regional Healthcare patients who wanted to switch Medicaid managed-care companies.

Much of the media attention regarding Thursday's Supreme Court ruling understandably focused on the upholding of the individual mandate. Less publicized was another part of the ruling--the part that said the health care law's expansion of Medicaid placed an unfair burden on states.

The process of opening the Louisville area to Medicaid competition is underway. Passport Health Plan has run Medicaid in the area for 15 years, but the state has been ordered by the federal government to allow at least one more private operator to do business in the region.

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