methane

J. Tyler Franklin

Three Democratic Louisville Metro Council Democrats are sponsoring a measure effectively banning development of anaerobic digestion facilities — or methane gas plants — for at least six months.

Backing the ordinance are council members David James of District 6, Barbara Shanklin of District 2 and Mary Woolridge of District 3. It’s set to be discussed in the council’s land development committee at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Their aversion to development of such facilities stems from a months-long fight that erupted last year in response to plans for developing a methane gas plant in a densely populated residential area of the California neighborhood.

Opponents lashed out against the proposal was unfair, saying western Louisville already has a high concentration of chemical and gas plants. During multiple community meetings on the proposal, neighbors expressed concerns about issues ranging from odors to traffic from heavy vehicles.

The city of Glasgow has taken another step toward limiting the impact of methane gas released from its landfill.

Governor Steve Beshear was in Barren County Wednesday to present Glasgow city leaders with a $100,000 grant from the state to pursue a landfill gas generation project.

Currently, methane emitted from garbage at local landfills is vented into the atmosphere. Under the new plan, methane would be piped into a generator and converted into electricity.

“This methane gas to electricity process is something we need to do more of in this country," Beshear said. "And to take refuge in a landfill, and take the methane gas off of that and turn it into electricity and put it on the grid so that people can use it--it saves us all money, it saves the environment.”

Glasgow mayor Rhonda Trautman says the city is acting now to avoid problems later.

The city of Glasgow is joining forces with regional power providers to make better economic and environmental use of methane emitted from local landfills.

Following a vote this week by the Glasgow City Council, mayor Rhonda Riherd Trautman can now open negotiations with Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative and East Kentucky Power Cooperative to create a landfill gas generation project.

Currently, methane emitted from garbage at local landfills is vented into the atmosphere. Under the new plan, methane would be piped into a generator and converted into electricity.

Trautman says the city is trying to act in advance of new federal regulations regarding methane that go into effect in 2016.