Mike Pence

Alex Brandon/AP

One way Republicans on Capitol Hill say they know becoming the vice president-elect hasn’t changed Mike Pence: He hasn’t changed his phone number.

Pence recently met with House Republicans in a closed door session where, “He said, ‘Most of you have my cell phone,’ which he found out after the election,” laughed Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., one of Trump’s earliest allies in Congress. “He wants to encourage us to continue to reach out to him,” Barletta added.

Pence’s accessibility is a comfort to Republicans, who still view President-elect Donald Trump as a wild-card. When he takes the oath of office in January, Trump will be the most politically inexperienced man to ever enter the Oval Office. Trump has never served in government or had to cut a legislative deal.

But Pence is a familiar face on Capitol Hill, where he served for 12 years before becoming Indiana governor. At the same meeting, Pence told Republicans that while his role in Congress is now as president of the Senate, his heart remains in the House.

Matt Rourke/AP

After a weekend where Indiana Gov. Mike Pence strongly rebuked running mate Donald Trump and refused to campaign for him — and after a debate where Trump undercut a Pence policy proposal on Syria — Pence made the cable news rounds Monday morning to praise Trump.

The appearances dispelled rumors that Pence was "holding his options open," as the Indianapolis Star put it, after more than two dozen Republican officeholders urged Trump to withdraw from the presidential race.

"It's absolutely false to suggest that at any point we considered dropping off this ticket," Pence told CNN. "It's the greatest honor of my life to be nominated by my party to be the next vice president of the United States of America."

Pence told the network that he was "offended" and "couldn't defend" the leaked 2005 video of Trump recounting groping women. "I think last night he showed his heart to the American people. He said he apologized to his family, apologized to the American people, that he was embarrassed by it, and then he moved on," said Pence. "He said that's not something that he's done."

Steve Helber/AP

Little has gone as expected in this extraordinary presidential cycle, so we should have known Tuesday’s vice presidential debate would have a twist or two in it, too.

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence each represented three clients in their 90 minute debate from Farmville, Va. The two former attorneys pled the case for their respective principals (Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump), to be sure, but also for their respective parties and for themselves.

It may be said that both succeeded in all three pursuits, with perhaps the clearest success on behalf of their own cases. One of the two will soon be vice president, placing him the proverbial heartbeat away. The other will automatically enter the conversation the next time his party needs a presidential nominee.

It is not entirely clear which of these prospects might be the most desirable at this moment in history.

In this regard, Pence, whose job of defending Trump on Tuesday night was both complex and thankless, may have benefited most. He was unable to defend much of what Trump has done or said, but he was earnest and artful in turning the multiple challenges aside.

L: Ralph Freso R: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The vice presidential nominees, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will meet on the debate stage Tuesday.

It’ll be two traditional politicians facing off in a non-traditional election year: Kaine as the safe and even boring choice by Hillary Clinton and Pence as the calm, unflappable balance to Donald Trump’s bombast.

When it comes to the issues, Kaine and Clinton mostly agree. Among other things, they want to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand gun control legislation, and they both support President Obama’s executive orders on immigration.

Pence and Trump, while wildly different in campaign style, agree that immigrants who enter the country illegally should not be granted amnesty, that abortions should be restricted, and that cutting taxes is the way to a healthier economy.

Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons

About 150 Syrian refugees have arrived in Indiana in the months since a federal judge scuttled Republican Gov. Mike Pence’s order blocking state agencies from helping their resettlement.

Refugee assistance groups expect more this year, even as lawyers for the state go before a federal appeals court Sept. 14 to try to have the judge’s decision overturned.

After the Paris terrorist attack in November, Pence said he didn’t believe the federal government was adequately screening refugees from the war-torn country.

His office says the Republican vice presidential candidate hasn’t changed his mind, and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said he’d suspend arrivals from Syria, portraying them as a potential security threat.

NPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his running mate, Indiana Governor Mike Pence, are attending a fundraiser at a private home in Evansville next week.

Monday’s event is being hosted by businessman Steve Chancellor, the CEO of American Patriot Group, which makes field-ready meals for military personnel.

The Evansville Courier & Press reports Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie of Bowling Green is also scheduled to attend the fundraiser.

The minimum donation for a couple is $10,000. Photo opportunities and access to VIPs will cost more—between $25,000-$250,000.

Trump and Pence are trying to keep Indiana’s 11 electoral college votes in the Republican win category. Republican Mitt Romney beat President Obama by 10 percentage points in 2012.

John Locher/AP

After a night spent hammering Hillary Clinton, Day 3 of the GOP convention is being billed as a day where party leaders will lay out "the Republican vision for a new century of American leadership and excellence."

A bevy of political heavy hitters — Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio; Govs. Scott Walker and Rick Scott — will tee up the day's headliner: The Republican vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

The theme of the night? "Make America First Again."

With that, here's a list of speakers as detailed by the Republican Party:

Gov. Rick Scott, Florida

Laura Ingraham, radio host

Phil Ruffin, businessman, a casino mogul.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In choosing Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate, Donald Trump has reassured both establishment republicans and social conservatives — but he has also picked someone who in many ways is his polar opposite.

Pence addresses the Republican National Convention Wednesday night.

As a conservative talk show host in Indiana, Pence called himself "Rush Limbaugh on decaf."

The show was a springboard to runs for office that initially landed Pence flat on his face. He ran twice for the U.S. House of Representatives in 1988 and 1990, only to be decisively defeated after election records showed he used campaign funds to make mortgage payments, for golf fees, his wife's car payments, and other personal expenses. The payments were not illegal at the time but would become so under rules changes that followed the disclosure.

Michael Conroy/AP

So it's the week before the Republican National Convention and we don't know who the vice presidential running mate is going to be. Then the nominee schedules a Saturday midday event and walks onstage with a younger man from Indiana who is known for his ardent conservatism.

Sound familiar?

The year is 1988, the city is New Orleans, and the freshly announced GOP ticket is George H.W. Bush for president and Dan Quayle for vice president.

Surprised? Well, plenty of people were stunned at the time, too. Quayle was a senator but barely over 40, younger still in appearance and demeanor. He had been on some lists of prospects, but not near the top. His selection left many in the party and the media agog.

Donald Trump may have had something like that high-drama reveal in mind for the Hilton Ballroom on Friday. That was the moment he planned to bring out Gov. Mike Pence, who, like Quayle, is a former Indiana congressman who had made it to statewide office.

Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

After weeks of speculation, presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump tweeted Friday morning that he has chosen Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate.

Trump had planned to hold a press conference Friday morning, but he canceled that after a deadly attack in France. He has now scheduled a news conference for Saturday at 11 a.m.

Pence quote-tweeted Trump’s announcement, adding that he is “honored” to join the ticket and “work to make America great again.”

Five Things To Know About Mike Pence

Jul 14, 2016
Tasos Katopodis/AFP/Getty Images

The buzz about Donald Trump’s vice-presidential pick is centering on Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

The Indianapolis Star is reporting that Pence “is dropping his re-election bid in Indiana to become Donald Trump’s running mate.”

Trump’s campaign has announced it will officially make an announcement on who his pick is at 11 am ET Friday from Trump Tower in New York. A campaign spokesman tweeted that the campaign is not confirming any vice-presidential pick at this point and said a decision has not yet been made.

Pence has been governor of Indiana since 2013. Before that, he served as the congressman from Indiana’s sixth congressional district from 2000 to 2012. House Speaker Paul Ryan praised Pence Thursday: “It’s no secret I’m a big fan of Mike Pence’s. We’re very good friends. I’ve very high regard for him.”

He called Pence a “good movement conservative.” Pence would help reassure conservatives, who have had their doubts about Trump, about what kind of president he would be. That’s critically important as the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, is set to kick off Monday. The clearest signal that Pence could be Trump’s pick came from a list of speakers the campaign released Thursday. It included Newt Gingrich and Chris Christie, two reported finalists for the job, but excluded Pence.

ACLU Sues Indiana Gov. Pence For Blocking Syrian Refugees

Nov 24, 2015
Office of IN Governor

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence is being sued for blocking Syrian refugees from resettling in Indiana.

The Indianapolis Star reports that the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana filed the lawsuit Monday night on behalf of Indianapolis-based nonprofit Exodus Refugee Immigration. It accuses Pence of violating the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act by accepting refugees from other countries but not from Syria.

The lawsuit comes about a week after Pence objected to plans for refugees to arrive in Indiana following the deadly attacks in Paris. A family that fled war-torn Syria was diverted from Indianapolis to Connecticut on Nov. 18 when Pence ordered state agencies to halt resettlement activities.

Pence has said that he opposes the resettlement of Syrian refugees in his state until he can be assured that proper security measures are in place. The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill last week calling for stricter security measures for Syrian refugees to enter the U.S.

An official from Pence’s office didn’t return the newspaper’s request for comment late Monday.

The culture wars are always percolating beneath the surface in presidential politics — until something or someone pushes them to the surface.

Indiana Governor Mike Pence is ditching a plan to create a state-run news site.

Pence told state agencies Thursday he was backing off plans to launch a website that was to be called Just IN.

The Indianapolis Star obtained planning documents this week about the proposed website.

The plan was to have Indiana’s governmental press secretaries write so-called “stories” and have the state-run “news service” compete with independent news agencies across the region.

The plan came under fire, with critics saying it amounted to passing off pro-government propaganda as news.

Indiana journalists objected to the idea of taxpayer dollars being used to support pro-Pence stories.

In a memo to staff Thursday, Pence said he had made the decision to pull the plug on the Just IN website idea.

Indiana has gained approval from the federal government to use an updated version of the state’s Health Indiana Plan, or HIP, instead of Medicaid.

The updated version will be called HIP 2.0, and it will provide health care to 350,000 uninsured Indiana residents.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced the expansion Tuesday.

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