Mike Pence

Ryland Barton

Vice President Mike Pence stopped in Louisville Saturday to pitch the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

“The Obamacare nightmare is about to end,” Pence said before a crowd of about 150 business owners.

The visit came as President Trump tries to rally support for the plan, especially among conservatives like Kentucky U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, who favors an outright repeal of Obamacare.

“Folks, let me be clear,” Pence said. “This is going to be a battle in Washington D.C. And for us to seize this opportunity to repeal and replace Obamacare once and for all we need every Republican in Congress and we’re counting on Kentucky.”

Pence to Visit Louisville to Promote Health Plan

Mar 9, 2017
Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

Vice President Mike Pence plans to visit Louisville, Kentucky, on Saturday as he tries to make the case for repealing and replacing former President Barack Obama's health care law.

Pence is set to appear with Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin at the event in the hometown of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Fellow Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul has been a critic of the health care legislation backed by President Donald Trump and Pence.

Pence was in Ohio and Wisconsin last week in support of the repeal.

Darron Cummings/AP

Vice President Mike Pence used a private AOL account to conduct official business in his former position as the governor of Indiana, according to public records. And at one point, the account was hacked and used to send fraudulent emails seeking money from his contacts.

Pence used the account to communicate with advisers about issues including homeland security in Indiana and the security of the gates at the governor's mansion, The Indianapolis Star reports.

The newspaper says it obtained 29 pages of email records from current Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb's office in response to a public records request.

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

Vice President Mike Pence is asking the Indiana Supreme Court to let him keep secret some documents emailed to him while he was the state's governor.

The request comes after an Indianapolis lawyer earlier this month sought the overturning of a state appeals court decision denying access to emails sent to Pence in 2014 in which a staffer for Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott outlined a legal strategy for challenging then-President Barack Obama's executive order on immigration.

The appeals court ruled the documents are privileged attorney-client communications.

Evan Vucci/AP

Vice President Pence has done something that his predecessor, Joe Biden, did not do even once in his eight years in the same office.

He cast a tie-breaking vote in the U.S. Senate.

The occasion is Tuesday's confirmation of Betsy DeVos as President Trump's secretary of education. The DeVos nomination has so far proven the most contentious of all Trump's controversial Cabinet picks.

Two Republican senators, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, joined all 46 Democrats and both Independents in opposing DeVos. The other 50 Republicans, however, stood by the nominee.

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

To get a glimpse of where Medicaid may be headed after Donald Trump moves into the White House, it may be wise to look to Indiana.

That’s where Seema Verma, Trump’s pick to run the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, comes from. And that’s where she put her stamp on the state’s health care program for the poor.

Verma is a private consultant who was hired by Indiana Governor and Vice President-elect Mike Pence to design a Republican-friendly expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. The state paid her almost $5 million over four years through 2017, according to the contracts.

Alex Brandon/AP

One way Republicans on Capitol Hill say they know becoming the vice president-elect hasn’t changed Mike Pence: He hasn’t changed his phone number.

Pence recently met with House Republicans in a closed door session where, “He said, ‘Most of you have my cell phone,’ which he found out after the election,” laughed Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., one of Trump’s earliest allies in Congress. “He wants to encourage us to continue to reach out to him,” Barletta added.

Pence’s accessibility is a comfort to Republicans, who still view President-elect Donald Trump as a wild-card. When he takes the oath of office in January, Trump will be the most politically inexperienced man to ever enter the Oval Office. Trump has never served in government or had to cut a legislative deal.

But Pence is a familiar face on Capitol Hill, where he served for 12 years before becoming Indiana governor. At the same meeting, Pence told Republicans that while his role in Congress is now as president of the Senate, his heart remains in the House.

Matt Rourke/AP

After a weekend where Indiana Gov. Mike Pence strongly rebuked running mate Donald Trump and refused to campaign for him — and after a debate where Trump undercut a Pence policy proposal on Syria — Pence made the cable news rounds Monday morning to praise Trump.

The appearances dispelled rumors that Pence was "holding his options open," as the Indianapolis Star put it, after more than two dozen Republican officeholders urged Trump to withdraw from the presidential race.

"It's absolutely false to suggest that at any point we considered dropping off this ticket," Pence told CNN. "It's the greatest honor of my life to be nominated by my party to be the next vice president of the United States of America."

Pence told the network that he was "offended" and "couldn't defend" the leaked 2005 video of Trump recounting groping women. "I think last night he showed his heart to the American people. He said he apologized to his family, apologized to the American people, that he was embarrassed by it, and then he moved on," said Pence. "He said that's not something that he's done."

Steve Helber/AP

Little has gone as expected in this extraordinary presidential cycle, so we should have known Tuesday’s vice presidential debate would have a twist or two in it, too.

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence each represented three clients in their 90 minute debate from Farmville, Va. The two former attorneys pled the case for their respective principals (Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump), to be sure, but also for their respective parties and for themselves.

It may be said that both succeeded in all three pursuits, with perhaps the clearest success on behalf of their own cases. One of the two will soon be vice president, placing him the proverbial heartbeat away. The other will automatically enter the conversation the next time his party needs a presidential nominee.

It is not entirely clear which of these prospects might be the most desirable at this moment in history.

In this regard, Pence, whose job of defending Trump on Tuesday night was both complex and thankless, may have benefited most. He was unable to defend much of what Trump has done or said, but he was earnest and artful in turning the multiple challenges aside.

L: Ralph Freso R: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The vice presidential nominees, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will meet on the debate stage Tuesday.

It’ll be two traditional politicians facing off in a non-traditional election year: Kaine as the safe and even boring choice by Hillary Clinton and Pence as the calm, unflappable balance to Donald Trump’s bombast.

When it comes to the issues, Kaine and Clinton mostly agree. Among other things, they want to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand gun control legislation, and they both support President Obama’s executive orders on immigration.

Pence and Trump, while wildly different in campaign style, agree that immigrants who enter the country illegally should not be granted amnesty, that abortions should be restricted, and that cutting taxes is the way to a healthier economy.

Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons

About 150 Syrian refugees have arrived in Indiana in the months since a federal judge scuttled Republican Gov. Mike Pence’s order blocking state agencies from helping their resettlement.

Refugee assistance groups expect more this year, even as lawyers for the state go before a federal appeals court Sept. 14 to try to have the judge’s decision overturned.

After the Paris terrorist attack in November, Pence said he didn’t believe the federal government was adequately screening refugees from the war-torn country.

His office says the Republican vice presidential candidate hasn’t changed his mind, and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said he’d suspend arrivals from Syria, portraying them as a potential security threat.

NPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his running mate, Indiana Governor Mike Pence, are attending a fundraiser at a private home in Evansville next week.

Monday’s event is being hosted by businessman Steve Chancellor, the CEO of American Patriot Group, which makes field-ready meals for military personnel.

The Evansville Courier & Press reports Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie of Bowling Green is also scheduled to attend the fundraiser.

The minimum donation for a couple is $10,000. Photo opportunities and access to VIPs will cost more—between $25,000-$250,000.

Trump and Pence are trying to keep Indiana’s 11 electoral college votes in the Republican win category. Republican Mitt Romney beat President Obama by 10 percentage points in 2012.

John Locher/AP

After a night spent hammering Hillary Clinton, Day 3 of the GOP convention is being billed as a day where party leaders will lay out "the Republican vision for a new century of American leadership and excellence."

A bevy of political heavy hitters — Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio; Govs. Scott Walker and Rick Scott — will tee up the day's headliner: The Republican vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

The theme of the night? "Make America First Again."

With that, here's a list of speakers as detailed by the Republican Party:

Gov. Rick Scott, Florida

Laura Ingraham, radio host

Phil Ruffin, businessman, a casino mogul.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In choosing Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate, Donald Trump has reassured both establishment republicans and social conservatives — but he has also picked someone who in many ways is his polar opposite.

Pence addresses the Republican National Convention Wednesday night.

As a conservative talk show host in Indiana, Pence called himself "Rush Limbaugh on decaf."

The show was a springboard to runs for office that initially landed Pence flat on his face. He ran twice for the U.S. House of Representatives in 1988 and 1990, only to be decisively defeated after election records showed he used campaign funds to make mortgage payments, for golf fees, his wife's car payments, and other personal expenses. The payments were not illegal at the time but would become so under rules changes that followed the disclosure.

Michael Conroy/AP

So it's the week before the Republican National Convention and we don't know who the vice presidential running mate is going to be. Then the nominee schedules a Saturday midday event and walks onstage with a younger man from Indiana who is known for his ardent conservatism.

Sound familiar?

The year is 1988, the city is New Orleans, and the freshly announced GOP ticket is George H.W. Bush for president and Dan Quayle for vice president.

Surprised? Well, plenty of people were stunned at the time, too. Quayle was a senator but barely over 40, younger still in appearance and demeanor. He had been on some lists of prospects, but not near the top. His selection left many in the party and the media agog.

Donald Trump may have had something like that high-drama reveal in mind for the Hilton Ballroom on Friday. That was the moment he planned to bring out Gov. Mike Pence, who, like Quayle, is a former Indiana congressman who had made it to statewide office.

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