Mitch McConnell

Office of Sec. Grimes

Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes isn’t being honest with voters about her support of Kentucky’s coal industry, according to a video released today by the conservative Project Veritas.

The video by James O’Keefe—who was widely criticized for deceptively editing a video about ACORN in 2009—relies on hidden camera interviews with Kentucky Democratic officials about Grimes and coal, but ultimately doesn't prove much about where she truly stands on coal.

The video was disseminated with a headline stating that it's Grimes' staff members who are talking.

But O’Keefe fails to get either Alison Lundergan Grimes or any of her paid campaign staffers on video. What he gets instead are county Democratic Party officials—from Fayette and Warren counties—and a field organizer. All say something similar to what Juanita Rodriguez of Warren County says when asked if Grimes is lying about her support of coal:

“Well, I don’t really think her heart is 100 percent in backing coal, but she has to say she is because she will not get a huge number of votes in this state if she doesn’t,” Rodriguez said.

Lisa Autry

There’s been a turnaround in the latest Bluegrass Poll, which now shows Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Alison Lundergan Grimes leading incumbent Mitch McConnell by two percentage points, 46-44.

Grimes’ lead is within the poll’s margin of error. In the last poll, released in late August, McConnell had a four-point lead over his challenger. 

The two candidates are scheduled to meet in debate next Monday on KET.  Libertarian candidate David Patterson, who garnered 3 percent support in the latest Bluegrass poll, was not invited to take part in the debate.  It's a decision that led Patterson to file suit against the network.

The deadline to register to vote in the November 4th election is Monday.

Romney Praises McConnell In Kentucky Senate Race

Oct 2, 2014
Mitt Romney/Facebook

Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney endorsed Sen. Mitch McConnell for re-election on Thursday after a private fundraiser at a Lexington horse farm.

Romney, who lost to Obama in 2012 but won Kentucky with 60 percent of the vote, said McConnell winning re-election would be good for Kentucky and good for the country because it could lead to him becoming the Senate majority leader if Republicans take control of the Senate. He said a McConnell-run Senate would result in lawmakers passing legislation Americans want to see passed.

Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes criticized Romney for his comments in 2012 that he did not worry about the 47 percent of voters who would vote for a Democrat no matter what. She said Kentucky deserves a senator who will fight to keep jobs in the state.

Emil Moffatt

Thousands of Kentucky workers continue looking for new opportunities in a state where the employment landscape continues to dramatically change.  Coal jobs have seen a steep decline – as have manufacturing positions – many of which have been relocated overseas. 

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes says congress can take action to make Kentucky and every other state more attractive to U.S. companies.

“We can fund investments in American businesses that create jobs for Kentucky workers,” said Grimes in a phone interview with WKU Public Radio Wednesday. “I think we can expand tax credits for businesses relocating to the United States and end the tax breaks for businesses that ship jobs outside of the Commonwealth.  Rebuilding Kentucky’s manufacturing sector is a priority for me,” said Grimes.

As for increased EPA regulations which have been partially blamed for the loss of coal jobs, Grimes says, if elected, she will work closely with lawmakers from both parties to make sure national energy policy has a “meaningful, long-term place” for coal.

Grimes is trying to defeat five-term incumbent Republican Mitch McConnell in the November 4th election.

Abbey Oldham

Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell has made no secret of his plans should he win re-election next month and should he become Senate Majority Leader.

The latter will happen if McConnell defeats Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes and Republicans win a net of six Senate seats in November. McConnell has told audiences and reporters that, if he became Senate Majority Leader, he would seek to defeat President Obama’s legislative agenda by adding language to spending bills that would strip funding from projects the President supports.

In an interview with WKU Public Radio Wednesday, McConnell was asked specifically which programs he would seek to defund.

WKU Public Radio: What specific programs or initiatives would you seek to block if you were to become Senate Majority Leader?

Sen. Mitch McConnell: Well, my first choice, obviously, is to see what the President is willing to do with us. We need to do comprehensive tax reform. It’s been 30 years since we scrubbed the code. The President says he wants to do trade agreements. That’s a big winner for Kentucky agriculture. So I think you would anticipate kind of a mix of things, hopefully working on things we can agree on together.

But there are some things we would differ on. The initiatives that the President has carried out through the regulatory side have been quite burdensome to the economy. And we would indeed seek to reign in the regulators, and a good example of that is the war on coal, which has created a depression in eastern Kentucky.

McConnell, Grimes Differ on Marijuana

Sep 26, 2014
WKU Public Radio

Kentucky's U.S. Senate candidates agree growing hemp is a good thing for the state, but they differ about the cannabis plant's cousin, marijuana.

Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes told a radio interviewer on Thursday that she favors having a discussion to reclassify marijuana, especially for medical purposes. She criticized Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell for not wanting to have those discussions.
McConnell said Friday he opposes the legalization of marijuana in all circumstances, including for medical purposes. He said legalizing marijuana would send the wrong message to a country that he says should be fighting drugs.

About a dozen Kentucky farmers harvested the state's first commercial hemp crop in decades earlier this week. McConnell and Grimes have said they support


The Kentucky AFL-CIO is launching a mail campaign against Senator Mitch McConnell that the group says is part of a “massive political mobilization” that will also include knocking on doors, worksite fliers, and phone banking.  

The labor group is coming to the aid of McConnell’s Democratic challenger, Alison Lundergan Grimes.

The state AFL-CIO says it will distribute over 70,000 mailers in the coming days attacking Sen. McConnell, saying the Louisville Republican has “been in Washington too long, and he’s lost his way.” The labor group blasts the incumbent for voting against bills that would increase the minimum wage and black lung benefits for miners.

An AFL-CIO spokesman told WKU Public Radio there are over 350,000 current and retired workers in Kentucky who are members of the labor group.

Offices of Sen. McConnell and Sec. Grimes

An outside group supporting Senator Mitch McConnell is spending nearly $1 million over the next week to run ads attacking his opponent on the immigration issue.

While immigration hasn’t been a major topic of focus in the Senate race between McConnell and Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, the ads accuse Grimes of backing legislation that would lead to “citizenship for millions who broke the law.”

The Kentucky chapter of the ACLU is asking Kentucky Educational Television to adopt more inclusive rules related to who it invites to appear on its televised debates.

The Courier-Journal reports that the legal director for the Kentucky ACLU sent a letter to KET saying the statewide broadcaster might be running afoul of federal law due to changes it made to it rules regarding debates.

A copy of the rules sent to WKU Public Radio by KET stated that candidates invited to appear at its U.S. Senate debate must have accepted at least $100,000 in contributions for the current election. Another rule says that those invited must have at least 10 points of support in a public opinion survey conducted by an independent pollster.

Offices of Sen. McConnell and Sec. Grimes

Two polls show Mitch McConnell with a lead over Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes in Kentucky U.S. Senate race. 

A Rasmussen survey conducted last week shows McConnell with a 46-41 lead over Grimes among likely voters.  In May, the incumbent Republican had a slightly larger, seven-percentage point lead.  The two candidates were tied according to Rasmussen in January. The survey has a margin of error of plus-or-minus four percentage points.

Meantime, a new CNN poll has McConnell up four points over Grimes, which falls within the survey’s margin of error. Fifty-percent of poll respondents said they would support Sen. McConnell, with 46 percent backing Grimes. That survey also shows 16 percent of Democrats said they were either supporting or leading towards supporting McConnell.

Despite trailing in the polls overall, Grimes has big leads over McConnell in the state’s urban areas, including a 27-point-lead in the Louisville region.