Mitch McConnell

Lisa Autry

One of the nation’s most closely watched political horse races played out in Owensboro Tuesday.  Kentucky’s U.S. Senate nominees met at the Red, White, and Blue Picnic on the lawn of the Daviess County Courthouse.

"Our first speaker, please give a warm Daviess County round of applause for challenger and Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes," announced emcee Kirk Kirkpatrick.

Before a crowd of several hundred, Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes utilized a classic campaign strategy: it’s time for change.

"This election comes at a critical time because Mitch McConnell's Washington is not working for Kentucky," suggested Grimes.

Wearing a red dress with cowboy boots, Grimes spoke forcefully as she painted McConnell as the embodiment of all that is wrong in Washington.

Offices of Sen. McConnell and Sec. Grimes

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has endorsed Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes in the Kentucky Senate race. Albright served as Secretary of State under President Bill Clinton. 

Meantime, Republican Mitch McConnell is calling on 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney to give his campaign a boost.  The Herald-Leader reports Romney will appear at a McConnell fundraiser October 2nd in Lexington.  

The former Massachusetts governor won Kentucky in 2012, picking up 60 percent of the vote.

Centre College

Kentucky Senate candidates Mitch McConnell and Alison Lundergan Grimes will debate October 13th on KET, but they won’t be debating this September at Centre College.  The Danville-based school announced Monday it is calling off attempts to try and host a Senate debate this year. 

“My disappointment runs deep for the citizens of Kentucky, who deserve to make an informed decision on election day,” said Centre College President John A. Roush in a written statement. “We had every indication early on that agreement could be reached, but as time wore on, compromise on the part of both campaigns simply didn’t occur.”

Centre extended invitations to both camps in July, but said Monday it couldn’t get the two sides to commit to the proposed Sept. 3 debate.  Centre hosted vice presidential debates in 2000 and 2012. 

Grimes and McConnell will appear together Tuesday at the Red White & Blue Picnic in Owensboro, but it’s not a traditional debate format.

Offices of Sen. McConnell and Sec. Grimes

Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes denies accusations that her campaign may have violated federal campaign finance laws.

When asked by reporters at the Kentucky Farm Bureau’s ham breakfast in Louisville Thursday, Grimes downplayed a Politico report suggesting her father, Kentucky Democratic party power broker Jerry Lundergan, used his catering company to purchase his daughter’s campaign bus then rented it to her for far less than  market value.

"These are baseless, unfounded, bullying accusations from the McConnell campaign, just an attempt to try to divert attention away from serious questions that Kentuckians have about Mitch McConnell's family profiting off the loss of coal jobs," said Grimes.

The McConnell campaign did not address Grimes’ accusation in a statement to Kentucky Public Radio, saying instead that her campaign is suffering from “potentially very significant legal problems.”

Centre College

Following the announcement that Kentucky's two leading U.S. Senate candidates will appear on Kentucky Educational Television, Centre College's president is reaching out to both camps.

Centre College proposed hosting a debate September 3 between incumbent Republican Senator Mitch McConnell and Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

In a letter posted Wednesday on the Danville college's website, President John Roush says Centre is awaiting a response. He says time is ticking but he remains optimistic both candidates will accept.

"It's really about the citizens of the Commonwealth," the letter read. "This is no longer for me about my interests or even Centre College's interests. The citizens of this state deserve the right to hear these candidates and I'm hoping they'll figure that out."

Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell and Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes traded familiar barbs Wednesday while discussing agricultural issues at the Kentucky Farm Bureau headquarters in Louisville.

The 90-minute forum offered voters one of the few opportunities to contrast the two candidates in person, and covered a wide range of topics from the farm bill, immigration reform, and Affordable Care Act.

Senate Tracker: A Tough Fight In Kentucky

Aug 20, 2014

This week’s installment of Senate Tracker focuses on Kentucky, where Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes is trying to unseat longtime Senator Mitch McConnell.

Democrats see the 35-year-old secretary of state of Kentucky as their greatest hope in years to grab the seat, but McConnell is pitting himself as the change candidate, arguing that she would continue the policies of President Obama.

Kevin Willis of WKU Public Radio in Bowling Green, Kentucky, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the race.

A new report claims Senator Mitch McConnell has a trend of skipping out on Senate Agriculture Committee hearings for events unrelated to his home state.

Kentucky's Democratic U.S. Senate candidate is denying allegations that she received a sweetheart deal on the use of her campaign bus. The response came after POLITICO reported Tuesday that a company owned by Grimes’ father purchased the bus and appeared to be renting it to her campaign at a discounted rate.

Offices of Sen. McConnell and Sec. Grimes

Senator Mitch McConnell has accepted an invitation to debate Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes on KET in October.

KET announced Monday that the incumbent Republican said he would appear alongside the Democratic Secretary of State October 13 on the program Kentucky Tonight.

Senior Director of Communications for KET Tim Bischoff told WKU Public Radio that Libertarian candidate David Patterson, who qualified for the November ballot last week, would not be invited to the KET debate.

Bischoff said candidates were chosen for the event based on specific criteria. According to a document Bischoff sent to WKU Public Radio, those criteria are:

Kevin Willis

The lobbying wing of the National Rifle Association has sent a mailer to some residents in Kentucky that says Senator Mitch McConnell will stop the “gun control agenda” of President Obama and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.  

It hit mailboxes shortly after it was revealed that McConnell’s wife, Elaine Chao, sits on the board of a charity run by Bloomberg.

The mail piece came from the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, and by law cannot be authorized by a candidate or candidate’s committee. Featuring on the front photos of Bloomberg and President Obama, with a dark, grainy picture of New York City in the background, the mailer says “Restricting Your Second Amendment Rights is Obama’s Unfinished Business.”

The back features a picture of McConnell, with assurances that the incumbent Republican opposes “any bans on guns and ammunition”, “a federal gun registration database”, and what it describes as the President’s “anti-gun nominees for the U.S. Supreme Court.”

The NRA’s criticism of Bloomberg’s gun control views comes as McConnell was recently forced to answer questions about his wife’s role on the board of Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Lisa Autry

U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell sat down with some of Kentucky’s religious leaders Thursday to talk issues of faith ahead of the November election. 

Albert Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, asked McConnell about the current persecution of Christians in the Middle East. McConnell said he thinks the militant violence is related to the troop withdrawal from Iraq, which he blamed on President Obama.

"This is the inevitable consequence of no residual presence," claimed McConnell. "I don't want that confused with thinking I want another Iraq war, but I don't think this would have happened in the first place if we had not taken the opportunity to give these characters a chance to assert themselves again."

The forum, held at Eastwood Baptist Church in Bowling Green, also touched on the issues of abortion, gay marriage, and immigration.

Two new polls offer the latest numbers on Kentucky's senate race and next year's race for the Governor's mansion.

Public Policy Polling found Kentucky incumbent senator Mitch McConnell at 44%, with 40% for Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes and 7% for Libertarian David Patterson. The poll also showed that McConnell has a high negative image as well. Among the undecided voters, McConnell has just a 10% approval rating to 66% of voters who disapprove of him.

Looking ahead to next year's race for Governor, Public Policy Polling finds a wide open race.

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes has joined the list of confirmed speakers at Owensboro’s Red, White & Blue Picnic later this month.  Grimes’ November opponent, Senator Mitch McConnell already committed to the August 26th event.

The Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce sponsors the picnic which begins at 5 p.m. on the lawn of the Daviess County Courthouse.

Libertarian Set To Appear On U.S. Senate Ballot

Aug 12, 2014

A Harrodsburg police officer will be on the ballot for U.S. Senate in Kentucky.

David Patterson filed with the Secretary of State's office on Monday as a Libertarian. He needed at least 5,000 valid signatures to appear on the Nov. 4 ballot. A spokeswoman said Patterson had at least 5,000 signatures but the office was still verifying the total number.

Patterson will be an underdog against Republican Sen.  Mitch McConnell and Democratic candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes, who have raised millions of dollars in one of the country's most competitive races. Kentucky's Libertarian Party has just over 4,000 registered voters, according to the Secretary of State's Office.

Mike Maggard, Robert Edward Ransdell and Shawna Sterling have filed as write-in candidates. Their names will not appear on the ballot.

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