NRA

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL News

Despite his failed presidential run, Sen. Rand Paul easily won the Republican nomination for reelection to his Senate seat last week.

Paul said he would support his former rival in the presidential race — Donald Trump — in the likely case that the New York businessman is the party’s nominee. But during an interview at last week’s NRA conference in Louisville, Paul said Trump “has a ways to go” to unite the Republican Party behind him.

“But I think he’s heading in the right direction,” Paul added.

Trump is the only candidate remaining in the Republican nominating contest. He’s been working to unite GOP leaders who have been skeptical of his candidacy and conservative credentials.

Some Republicans have questioned Trump’s support of gun rights; he worked to solidify his qualifications at the Louisville NRA event, calling for the elimination of gun-free zones and bashing likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s record on guns.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Top Republicans including Donald Trump, House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. Mitch McConnell and Gov. Matt Bevin will all speak at the National Rifle Association annual meeting in Louisville Friday.

In a conference call on Thursday, Congressman John Yarmuth, a Democrat from Louisville, criticized Trump’s attendance at the event, saying that he was “one of the most incredible panderers.”

“Pandering to the worst instincts of America — xenophobia, anti-Muslim sentiment, anti-immigrant sentiment, misogyny — this is why I think he is singularly unqualified to be president of the United States,” Yarmuth said. “I hope that during his appearance in Louisville there is an enormous outpouring of opposition.”

The NRA convention is expected to draw more than 70,000 people over the weekend and features 8,000 exhibitors.

Kevin Willis

The lobbying wing of the National Rifle Association has sent a mailer to some residents in Kentucky that says Senator Mitch McConnell will stop the “gun control agenda” of President Obama and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.  

It hit mailboxes shortly after it was revealed that McConnell’s wife, Elaine Chao, sits on the board of a charity run by Bloomberg.

The mail piece came from the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, and by law cannot be authorized by a candidate or candidate’s committee. Featuring on the front photos of Bloomberg and President Obama, with a dark, grainy picture of New York City in the background, the mailer says “Restricting Your Second Amendment Rights is Obama’s Unfinished Business.”

The back features a picture of McConnell, with assurances that the incumbent Republican opposes “any bans on guns and ammunition”, “a federal gun registration database”, and what it describes as the President’s “anti-gun nominees for the U.S. Supreme Court.”

The NRA’s criticism of Bloomberg’s gun control views comes as McConnell was recently forced to answer questions about his wife’s role on the board of Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Abbey Oldham

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has bagged an award from the powerful National Rifle Association, giving him bragging rights for his re-election bid next year in a state where hunting is a tradition. The Republican's opponents are defending their own gun-rights stands in the campaign cross-fire.

Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes points to her NRA membership and says she'd welcome McConnell to shoot with her at a gun range.
 
McConnell didn't respond to a reporter's question Friday asking if he'd take Grimes up on her offer.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is lending his name to a conservative gun rights group that's targeting fellow Republicans.

The group, the National Association for Gun Rights, is running ads against two Congressmen in Virginia, including House Minority leader Eric Cantor, saying they gave in too easily to President Obama's gun control measures. They also say the National Rifle Association is too willing to compromise on gun rights.

NRA To Hold 2016 Convention in Kentucky

Feb 1, 2013
flickr

The National Rifle Association is returning to Louisville for its national convention in 2016.

The event is expected to draw more than 70,000 visitors as well as national politicians and pundits during that presidential election year.

The NRA held its 2008 convention in Louisville. That was also an election year and the convention heard speeches from John McCain, Mike Huckabee and Karl Rove.

Voters across the state will cast ballots on Election Day to decide whether hunting and fishing should be a constitutional right in Kentucky. The effort is backed by the National Rifle Association, which has pushed similar measures in 12 other states as a way to stop any possible effort in the future to ban hunting.