Politics

Politics
2:55 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Stumbo: GOP Efforts to Defund ACA Won't Prevent Program from Moving Forward in Kentucky

House Majority Floor Leader Rocky Adkins, D-Sandy Hook (left), confers with House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, during a meeting of the state budget conference committee.
Credit Kentucky LRC

Kentucky’s highest-ranking Democratic lawmaker says language in the state’s budget that attempts to pull funding for the Affordable Care Act won’t kill the program.

Kentucky is set to begin paying a portion of the cost for expanded Medicaid and the health-insurance exchange in 2017. Provisions in the recently-passed state budget bar state money from going toward the program.

But House Speaker Greg Stumbo says it's largely symbolic.

“We know that that would have been probably something that we’d still been there debating, and so after reviewing the language and reviewing the governor’s implementation of what we call ‘Beshear Care,’ we didn’t feel like that this language would be egregious to the governor in moving forward.”

The governor’s office spearheaded Kentucky’s implementation of the ACA, but has declined to comment on the budget language.

Kentucky Budget
7:56 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Kentucky House Approves Budget, Sends Spending Plan to Gov. Beshear

Both the Kentucky House and Senate have approved a two-year budget for the state.
Credit Kentucky LRC

After winning speedy approval in the Senate, the Kentucky House has given final passage of the state’s $20 billion two-year budget.

Lawmakers passed a series of budget bills funding the legislative, judicial and executive branches of state government with minimal debate, and earlier than they have in previous years.

The budget bills will head to Gov. Steve Beshear’s desk for approval. They largely preserve his efforts to fund K-12 education at the cost of other state programs.

House Speaker Greg Stumbo hailed the compromise with the Senate as an example of how democracy can work.

“The gridlock and the stalemate that’s engulfed both parties in Washington didn’t make it’s way to Kentucky. It worked," Stumbo said, to applause from fellow lawmakers. "And you can go home tonight and you can look your constituents in the eye while you’re on this veto break and you can say it worked. We did what you paid us to do.”

Lawmakers will now break for two weeks until returning April 14 for a veto session.

Politics
5:40 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Kentucky Legislature: Yes to Cannabis Oil and Higher Gas Tax

Doctors at two Kentucky research hospitals can prescribe medicine derived from marijuana oil to treat child seizures under a bill that cleared the General Assembly on Monday.

The bill would allow Kentuckians to use cannabidiol in two cases: a prescription from a doctor at the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville research hospitals, or a trial from the U. S. Food and Drug Administration.

The Senate gave the bill final approval Monday and it will become law unless Democratic Governor Steve Beshear vetoes it. The bill comes as states across the country are allowing the limited use of marijuana and its products for medical purposes.

In other news from Frankfort, Kentucky drivers will not pay more in states taxes at the gas pump this summer.

House Speaker Greg Stumbo said he's told legislative leaders to prepare the state's two year road spending plan without the extra $107 million that would come from a 1.5 cents-per-gallon increase in the state gas tax.

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Politics
4:16 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Bill Restoring Voting Rights to Some Felons Unlikely to Become Law in Kentucky

Rep. Jesse Crenshaw (D-Lexington)
Credit Kentucky LRC

A bill that would restore voting rights for thousands of Kentucky felons isn’t likely to pass this year.

Lawmakers say they could not reach an agreement over different versions of the proposed legislation.

GOP Senate Floor Leader Damon Thayer previously amended the bill to include a five year waiting period and not cover felons with multiple offenses. He says passage is unlikely this year.

But bill sponsor Jesse Crenshaw says Thayer is refusing to help with a compromise.

“It’s hard for me to deal with Sen. Thayer’s logic because of the fact that he is the man that has to act on calling the bill, calling even the senate committee substitute to not recede and he’s the only one that can do that," Crenshaw, a Lexington Democrat, said.

Supporters of the proposed legislation have criticized Thayer’s changes, which would not affect about half of the felons the original bill was meant to help. The original measure would've affected an estimated 180,000 Kentuckians.

Politics
8:40 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Kentucky Redistricting Creates Political Stasis

Kentucky State Capitol
Credit Kentucky LRC

Despite a contentious lawsuit and dramatic regional population shifts, Kentucky's 2013 congressional and legislative redistricting processes have resulted in political stasis.

Kentucky's congressional districts maintained a 5-1 Republican to Democratic split.

The Republican-controlled Senate was still able to reinforce Republican strongholds.

The Democrat-controlled House of Representatives likewise strengthened party centers.

Steve Voss, a political scientist at the University of Kentucky, says although the process of partisan entrenchment can often contribute to federal gridlock, Kentucky's regional concerns more often override partisan divides.

With state elections still months away, local party gains and losses remain unclear.

Politics
6:21 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Budget Deal Includes Language to Prohibit Kentucky General Funds to Be Used for ACA Implementation

Provisions to block state money from being used on Kentucky's implementation of the Affordable Care Act will remain in the budget agreement reached over the weekend by state lawmakers. Sparring between House Democrats and Senate Republicans over the ACA dominated negotiations.

The ACA covers the costs of implementation through 2017, after which the tab will be split with the state.

Now, Senate President Robert Stivers says lawmakers will send the governor a budget that blocks general funds from going toward the state's health insurance exchange, Kynect, and the expansion of Medicaid.

"I think everybody saw that we have worked hard over the last three or four days," the Manchester Republican said. "There's been a lot of discussions. At points in time there may have been a little bit of political theater involved but we've reached an agreement, compromising and understanding the realities of each person's positions and each region's positions and each party's positions."

Currently, over 320,000 people have been insured through Kynect, with two-thirds obtaining Medicaid coverage.

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Politics
9:49 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

Budget Deal Reached by House and Senate Lawmakers Cuts Funding for State Universities by 1.5%

Kentucky legislative leaders have struck a deal on the state's next two-year budget.
Credit Kentucky LRC

Top Kentucky House and Senate lawmakers appear to have reached an agreement on the state's next two-year budget.

The Herald-Leader reports that negotiators from both chambers hammered out a budget deal after being cloistered in a committee room at the Capitol Annex in Frankfort Saturday night. They emerged from the room at around 5:30 a.m. Sunday morning.

Many of the sticking points worked out in the overnight meeting involved funding for higher education and money for K-12 education.

The blueprint would cut the operational budgets of state universities by 1.5 percent, which is less than the 2.5 percent cut proposed by Governor Steve Beshear. Most schools, like WKU, would be allowed to choose a top priority building project that would be paid for by general fund bonds and agency bonds.

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Politics
5:59 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

What's With This Video Of McConnell Doing Stuff?

The Kentucky Opportunity Coalition used footage from Mitch McConnell's campaign for its own ads.
AP

The video uploaded to Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell's YouTube channel on March 11 is no ordinary campaign ad:

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Politics
9:21 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Tennessee Senate Leader: Pay Raises, Higher Ed Funding Face Cuts

Credit capitol.tn.gov

Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says worse-than-expected revenue collections could force Tennessee to cancel planned pay raises for state employees and reduce planned investments in higher education.

The Blountville Republican told reporters at his weekly news conference on Thursday that he had not yet heard the outlines of fellow Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's proposals to deal with the shortfall, but Ramsey expressed a preference for finding the savings among bigger ticket items rather than spread among a large number of small projects.

The state's general fund revenues have fallen $260 million short of projections through the first seven months of the budget year.

Haslam is expected to release his proposed spending adjustments next week for the budget year beginning in July.

Politics/Business
8:12 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Kentucky Senate Approves Measure Creating Public-Private Partnerships for Infrastructure Projects

A bill that would permit private corporations to partner with government to finance infrastructure projects is one step closer to becoming law.

Filed by Rep. Leslie Combs, House Bill 407 passed the Senate by a 27-9 vote, and would allow local governments to partner with businesses to fund infrastructure projects.

Dissenting members worried that the legislation would afford private companies too much influence on public projects, and expressed concern over accountability of the process.

Sen. Perry Clark cited a Brookings Institute study that says public private partnerships, or “P3’s,” aren’t all they’re cracked up to be.

“They have over a two-thirds failure rate," the Louisville Democrat said. "Of the construction roads, they looked at 11 of them that were completed, seven of those ended in bankruptcy, and several of them ended in foreclosure. Oftentimes it was at great cost to the taxpayers that had to foot the difference.”

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