Pulaski County

A Kentucky lawmaker says his hometown city hall intruded into the free market by going into the retail gas business. Sen. Chris Girdler says he's preparing legislation that could shut down the pumps to the public.

The Republican's proposal comes months after the city of Somerset opened a retail gas station. The no-frills venture on the outskirts of town unnerved filling station and convenience store operators.

Girdler says his bill seeks to assure private business that government won't compete for their customers.

Somerset Mayor Eddie Girdler says the proposal amounts to an overreaction to something that's working. He says the feedback from customers has been overwhelmingly positive.

The Girdlers are distant relatives.

Pulaski County Detention Center

The attorney for the Somerset man accused in the fatal shooting of defense attorney Mark Stanziano this summer may be formulating an insanity defense in the case.  The lawyer for 40-year-old Clinton Inabnitt has filed notice of a potential insanity defense. 

The Herald-Leader reports a psychiatrist testified at a hearing Tuesday that Inabnitt is schizophrenic, delusional and refuses to take his medication.  On June 27, prosecutors say Inabnitt shot Stanziano multiple times outside his office in downtown Somerset.  

The judge in the case ordered Inabnitt to be given anti-psychotic medication -- forcibly if needed --  and says he’ll re-evaluate the case in 60 days.

Three Pulaski County residents are being charged with passing counterfeit money throughout the region.

The three were arrested this week by the Pulaski County Sherriff’s Department. The Herald-Leader reports that 37-year-old James Diars of Somerset; 54-year-old Linda Alton of Tateville, and 51-year-old Betty Stewart of Burnside were arrested after sheriff’s deputies investigated a report alleging that someone tried to pass counterfeit bills at a southern Pulaski County business.

Deputies later determined the suspects were trying to buy merchandise with the fake bills.

The Pulaski County Sheriff’s office says a separate fake bill that was later recovered had the same serial numbers as other fake bills confiscated by both the Somerset Police Department and by police in Danville.

The three suspects were being held in the Pulaski County jail, and are each facing charges of criminal possession of a forged instrument.

Timber Sale Proposed For Daniel Boone Forest

Aug 18, 2014
National Forest Service

The National Forest Service has proposed allowing more commercial logging in the Daniel Boone National Forest than it has in over a decade.

The logging would take place on 3,515 acres in Pulaski and McCreary counties as part of a project that also entails controlled burns and other activities on about 15,000 acres. It is designed to better manage the forest by improving wildlife habitat and forest health.

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports the proposal has prompted some concern and some support.

Kentucky Heartwood Director Jim Scheff said commercial logging carries risks and the Forest Service could accomplish its goal through less-invasive means.

McCreary County Judge-Executive Doug Stephens says some local residents would oppose logging due to environmental concerns while others would support it because it would boost the economy.

workready.ky.gov

Pulaski and Nelson counties have joined Daviess, Henderson, Warren and seven other counties as Kentucky "Work Ready Communities”.

The governor’s office says the designation “assures employers that a local work force has the talent and skills necessary” to staff new and existing jobs .

Qualification is based on six criteria including high school graduation rate.  Additionally, Marion County has been named a “Work Ready Community in Progress”.

Great American Brass Band Festival

The Great American Brass Band Festival celebrates its 25th anniversary this weekend in Danville.  Brass band music fans from around the world are expected to descend upon the town for the event.

“The best brass bands play on our stages – it’s quite an honor for them to do so. And so we bring the best of the best, and I think that’s part of why we’ve survived for 25 years and we intend to be around for many more, ” said executive director Niki Kinkade.

Kinkade says the event is expected to draw 30,000 people this weekend.

“It’s very much a community driven festival, we are basically financially supported by our community and through volunteerism and through all sorts of different activities that go on over the four-day weekend," said Kinkade. "The entire community comes together and helps to put this event on.”

Kentucky Explorer

A bluegrass musician buried in an unmarked grave in Somerset is going to receive a proper grave marker this weekend.

Leonard Rutherford was a popular bluegrass artist in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s, and performed as part of the Burnett-Rutherford Duo.

But Rutherford fell on hard times and was found dead along a Somerset road in 1951 at the age of 53.

Somerset Cemetery manager Tricia Neal says Rutherford's grave site was only recently identified when a local historian began asking about the long-forgotten musician.

"I started looking and I couldn't find him anywhere,” Neal told WKU Public Radio. “And I ended up just finding a penciled-in name on the back of an old index card. It had a note where he had been buried in this grave, and I went out to the cemetery and found it."

Clean-up is continuing nearly two weeks after a tanker truck spilled thousands of gallons of fuel in Pulaski County, Kentucky.  

The fuel has also gotten into a local cave system.

An 8,000 gallon fuel spill would cause problems no matter the location. But the accident on January 30 was in the midst of the Sloans Valley cave system near Somerset, and early tests showed that at least some of the fuel entered the cave.

Kevin Strohmeier is an emergency response coordinator with the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection. He says since Friday, air tests for volatile organic compounds at cave entrances have been negative. This could mean that all of the fuel that got into the cave has volatilized and evaporated, but Strohmeier says there are still environmental concerns at the spill site.

"I think probably just making sure that we try to maintain control of the source and if we can remove it, we do that," he said. "If we can’t remove it, we monitor it and recover as much of it as possible.

Strohmeier says he doesn’t yet know if there was any permanent damage done to the cave system by the spill.

Caves are very sensitive environments, and wildlife officials have also been monitoring the local bat population.

Federal investigators have spent time at the scene of a small plane crash in southern Kentucky that injured two men.

WLEX-TV in Lexington reported that the Federal Aviation Administration arrived in Pulaski County on Tuesday morning and spent the day trying to determine why the aircraft went down. The plane crashed Monday about a quarter of a mile from where it took off near Bronston.

The FAA took pictures, examined the wreckage, and walked around the large field where the plane went down. A spokesman for the FAA says the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the cause within a year.

The pilot, 54-year-old Gary McGothlin of Lexington, was in fair condition at the University of Kentucky Hospital. The passenger, 55-year-old Charles Jackson of Winchester, has been discharged.

SERVPRO of Pulaski and Laurel Counties will establish its headquarters in London, create ten new, full-time jobs and invest $666,500 in the area.

The company specializes in in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial properties after fire, smoke or water damage. SERVPRO, in London since 2005, has constructed a 15,000 square foot facility to serve as its regional headquarters.

To encourage the investment and job creation in London, the Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority preliminarily approved tax incentives for the company of up to $300,000 through the Kentucky Business Investment program.

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