Rand Paul

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky U.S. Senator Rand Paul is not happy with the current Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare. The plan comes from House Speaker Paul Ryan and has the support of President Donald Trump.

Although Paul was in Louisville Monday, he is skipping President Trump’s rally in Louisville Monday night, saying he was headed back to Washington to drum up votes against the repeal plan, which is headed for a vote Thursday.

“My hope is that it fails Thursday and that’s when the true negotiation begins,” Paul said at the Louisville Chamber of Commerce Monday morning.

The GOP repeal and replace bill would do away with the ACA’s requirement that individuals have health insurance and large employers provide it.

For Kentucky Voters, A Familiar Fight: Trump vs. Paul

Mar 10, 2017
J. Tyler Franklin

Duard Rutledge voted for Donald Trump and Rand Paul for the same reason: They’re not afraid of a fight.

That’s why the 66-year-old retired Toyota worker wasn’t worried to see Kentucky’s junior senator getting in the way of the Republican plan to replace Obama’s health care law.

“When you get two thoroughbreds, they are high strung,” he said. “But if you get them headed the right way they can both win the race.”

Paul has been one of the most vocal Senate critics of the GOP plan to replace the federal Affordable Care Act, even before he knew what was in it. Last week, he hauled a copy machine outside of the room where House Republicans were writing the bill and asked for a copy, highlighting the secrecy surrounding the proposal. Since then, he has declared the plan dead, calling it “Obamacare lite.”

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul introduced a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Wednesday that would do away with the law’s major reforms, including the requirement to have health insurance or pay a penalty and the ban on insurers refusing coverage for those with pre-existing conditions.

Under the proposal, people wouldn’t be required to get health insurance, nor would employers be required to offer it. Instead, groups of people and small employers could come together to form “independent health pools” to negotiate rates.

Rand Paul Might Stop An Obamacare Repeal. Here’s How

Jan 6, 2017
MSNBC

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said Wednesday that he would not vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, known to many as Obamacare, without voting for a replacement plan on the same day. He made the comments on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

“Here’s the great irony, this week we’re going to vote on a budget,” he said. “Everybody is hot and heavy to vote on this budget because they want to repeal Obamacare. But the budget they’re going to introduce will add $8.8 trillion to the debt over the next 10 years. So I told them look, I’m not going to vote for a budget that never balances.”

J. Tyler Franklin

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul has become an outspoken assessor of President-elect Donald Trump’s potential nominees for secretary of state, going out of his way to criticize several candidates for their hawkish foreign policy views.

Paul, a non-interventionist who has clashed with his party on foreign policy issues during his first term in office, is in a rare position to influence who Trump taps to be the next secretary of state.

A nominee would have to be approved by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and, with 10 Republicans and 9 Democrats on the panel, Paul represents a key swing vote.

So far, Paul has publicly stated that he would not support the nomination of former U.N. ambassador John Bolton, citing his support of the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

He’s also cast doubts on the prospects of former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, questioning the candidates’ views on foreign intervention.

J. Tyler Franklin

Republican Sen. Rand Paul has won reelection to his seat, defeating Democratic challenger Jim Gray, the mayor of Lexington.

Paul won all but seven of Kentucky’s 120 counties.

In his victory speech, Paul quoted the rock group Pink Floyd and said government needs to get out of the way of individuals’ creativity.

“The goal should be to set you free,” he said. “To leave you alone. To have a government so small you can barely see it.”

Paul is at the end of his first term in the Senate. He was part of a crowded field of candidates seeking the Republican nomination for president but suspended his campaign at the beginning of this year.

Paul (photo provided) Gray (Jim Gray for US Senate)

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray accused U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of having “wild-ass” ideas in their first and only face-to-face debate of the election year. The at times freewheeling event underscored the candidates’ differences on foreign policy and economic values.

Paul repeatedly tried to tie Gray to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama, who are both unpopular in Kentucky.

“The mayor’s endorsed both of these candidates, so it makes it very difficult for him in Western Kentucky or Eastern Kentucky to convince people that he’s for them when he’s for these regulations that have been killing their jobs,” Paul said.

The hour-long debate, which was televised live on KET, took place about a week before Kentuckians go to the polls on Nov. 8.

Gray is in his second term as mayor of Lexington. Paul is at the end of his first term in the Senate. He also sought the Republican nomination for president but dropped out of the race earlier this year.

Paul and Gray campaigns

With their only face-to-face debate and Election Day both coming up, Kentucky’s U.S. Senate candidates were at the same event Thursday night for the first time in two months. 

The candidates will debate for the first time Monday evening.

Incumbent Republican Sen. Rand Paul and Democratic candidate Jim Gray both attended the annual Red, White & Blue political forum in Owensboro.

Gray, the mayor of Lexington, criticized Paul for not supporting a bill that would shore up the ailing pensions of United Mine Workers of America members. And he compared himself to Kentucky’s late U.S. Senator from Owensboro saying, “Wendell Ford would have been with these mine workers that are losing their pensions and their benefits. Now I’ll tell you, I’m going to be a senator like Wendell Ford.”

Paul indicated he wouldn’t vote for the bill last month, saying that he was in favor of the concept but thought that a solution should help all miner pensions, not just those of the UMWA union.

Paul said the solution to the problem is to “stop hurting the coal miner.” “Why are the pension funds short? Why is this miner suffering because his pension is short? It’s because Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama killed the coal industry. They can’t contribute to the pension because of the war on coal.”

Paul and Gray will meet in their first and only in-person debate on Monday night. The event will be televised live on KET.

A Babbage Cofounder Pulse poll from mid-October showed Paul leading Gray 33 percent to 26.5 percent with 40 percent of would-be voters undecided.

Becca Schimmel

Kentucky’s Democratic U.S. Senate candidate says the state’s economy would get a major boost from an infrastructure overhaul. Lexington Mayor Jim Gray spoke to students Friday at Western Kentucky University.

Gray said if nothing is done by the year 2020 it will take a trillion dollars to fix the nation’s infrastructure problems. The Barren County native cited a report from the American Society of Civil Engineers that gave Kentucky’s infrastructure a grade of C. Gray said lawmakers have to address the declining health of the nation’s roads, bridges and other modes of transportation first.

“What I would do is create a national infrastructure act, a bill, and I would be a champion for infrastructure and through that we will examine the needs and we will prioritize those needs and we will get the projects done,” Gray said.

 

The report from the ASCE gives the nation’s infrastructure an overall grade of D+.

21c Hotel

The Republican Party of Kentucky says a super PAC is inappropriately supporting Democratic Senate candidate Jim Gray because one of the organization’s leaders benefited from a city development initiative during Gray’s time as mayor of Lexington.

Kentucky Moving Forward released its first television ad criticizing Gray’s opponent, first term Sen. Rand Paul, on Tuesday. The commercial features a clip of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump saying that Paul “shouldn’t even be on this stage” during a debate earlier this year and criticizes Paul for having a $300,000 campaign debt.

The treasurer of the organization is Steve Wilson who is also the co-founder and CEO of 21c Museum Hotels, which opened a hotel in downtown Lexington earlier this year. The company received a $6 million Housing and Urban Development loan and a $1 million loan from the city, both of which had to be approved by the Lexington City Council.

Paul (photo provided) Gray (Jim Gray for US Senate)

The League of Women Voters has canceled its debate between incumbent Kentucky U.S. Sen. Rand Paul and his Democratic challenger, Lexington mayor Jim Gray, after Paul declined the invitation.

Paul’s campaign on Tuesday announced the two men would participate in a debate on Halloween night to be televised on KET.

“Dr. Paul has taken his message directly to the people in over 110 town halls across Kentucky, so he is happy to accept KET’s debate invitation and continue his efforts to present voters with a clear picture of a senator who believes in less spending, less taxes, and less debt,” said Paul spokeswoman, Kelsey Cooper.

Becca Schimmel

Senator Rand Paul is speaking out against accepting refugees from countries considered to have a high risk of terrorism, as well as the vetting process for Syrian refugees.

The Bowling Green Republican is critical of using federal dollars to resettle refugees in the U.S. During a visit to Western Kentucky University Monday, Paul said he thinks refugees should instead depend on sponsorships from third-party groups, like churches or non-governmental organizations.

“So, I’m not against it. My church here in town helped some of the first Bosnian families to come to town who’ve become a good part of our community. But at the same time I don’t think we should open our borders and say to the world, ‘Come to America.’”

J. Tyler Franklin

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray says many Kentuckians are just now starting to pay attention to the state’s U.S. Senate race.

Gray is the Democratic nominee who is trying to unseat incumbent Republican Rand Paul of Bowling Green.

The race isn’t receiving the same kind of national attention as several other U.S. Senate campaigns across the country, including Indiana’s.

But Gray says he’s not worried about perceptions that Kentucky’s race is uncompetitive.

“I’m accustomed to being in an underdog position. Every time I’ve run, I’ve been behind when I started the race—and I won the race.”

Gray says Congress currently lacks the ability to solve the nation’s most pressing problems. The Lexington Mayor says he would work as a bridge-builder between Republican and Democratic Senators, in an effort to find compromise on issues like job creation, infrastructure, and national security.

WFPL

The U.S. Senate has blocked a measure that would have halted the sale of weapons to Saudi Arabia. 

Kentucky Republican Rand Paul was one of four lawmakers who forced a vote on the issue.

On a 71-27 vote, U.S. Senators approved continuing to support Saudi Arabia, including the sale of more than a billion dollars in Abrams tanks and other military equipment. 

Senator Paul has called Saudi Arabia an uncertain ally with an abysmal human rights record. 

While the resolution didn't pass, Paul acknowledged the debate was significant in and of itself.

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul wants to halt the sale of $1 billion in U.S. weapons to Saudi Arabia.

The Bowling Green Republican said he planned to introduce what’s known as a privileged resolution Wednesday that would block the sale. Paul says the move guarantees the Senate will have to vote on the matter before going on a break in the next few weeks.

Paul cited two reasons why the U.S. shouldn’t ship the arms to the Saudis.

“One, I think they're an uncertain ally. Two, I think they have an abysmal human rights record. They treat women as second-class citizens there. Women who are raped are often then victimized by the state by imprisonment and whipping.”

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