Rand Paul

Sen. Rand Paul Returns to Washington Following Assault

Nov 13, 2017
Abbey Oldham

Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said Monday he is returning to Washington following an attack in his yard that left him with six broken ribs.

"While I'm still in a good deal of pain, I will be returning to work in the Senate today, ready to fight for liberty and help move forward with tax cuts in the coming days and weeks," Paul posted on his Twitter account .

Lisa Autry

The neighbor who has admitted to assaulting U.S. Senator Rand Paul outside his Bowling Green home made his first court appearance Thursday. 

Rene Boucher pleaded not guilty to a misdemeanor fourth degree assault charge in Warren District Court. 

Boucher told police he attacked Paul from behind while the Republican lawmaker was mowing his yard last week.  Speculation has been rampant about what prompted the physical altercation. 

A family friend previously told WKU Public Radio that the alleged assault was likely related to property and that Boucher had expressed anger about not being able to sell his home because of the trees on Paul’s property.

On Thursday, Boucher's attorney Matt Baker backed up those claims.  In an interview with NBC News, Baker was asked if the attack was about a "messy yard."

NPR

A close friend and neighbor of Rand Paul is sharing some information about what could have prompted the recent assault on the U.S. Senator. 

Retired physician Rene Boucher, also a neighbor, told police he attacked Paul from behind as the Republican lawmaker mowed his lawn last Friday. 

Alicia Stivers tells WKU Public Radio that she was the first person to see Paul following the attack and it apparently was related to property.

"He said that when he got up, Rene said something like 'I've been trying to sell my house for ten years and your trees are in the way,'"said Stivers.

Warren County Regional Jail

Some new information is coming to light as to why a retired physician assaulted U.S. Senator Rand Paul at his Bowling Green home over the weekend. 

According to the arrest warrant,  Rene Boucher admitted to police that he went onto Paul’s property and tackled him causing broken ribs and cuts to Paul’s face. 

Boucher's attorney, Matt Baker, issued the following statement to WKU Public Radio:

"Senator Paul and Dr. Boucher have been next door neighbors for 17 years.   They are also prominent members of the local medical community and worked together when they were both practicing physicians.  The unfortunate occurrence of November 3rd has absolutely nothing to do with either's politics or political agendas.   It was a very regrettable dispute between two neighbors over a matter that most people would regard as trivial.  We sincerely hope that Senator Paul is doing well and that these two gentlemen can get back to being neighbors as quickly as possible."

Sen. Rand Paul calls it an "unfortunate event." Police are calling it assault — and many people are trying to figure out why Paul's neighbor, a fellow medical doctor, might allegedly have attacked him with enough force to fracture five ribs. Paul was reportedly tackled while he was mowing the grass at his home in Bowling Green, Ky.

Police who were called to Paul's home shortly after 3 p.m. local time on Friday say they arrested Paul's neighbor, 59-year-old Rene Boucher, and charged him with fourth-degree assault.

J. Tyler Franklin

A Bowling Green man was arrested for fourth-degree assault following an incident Friday afternoon at the home of U.S. Senator Rand Paul.

Fifty-nine-year-old Ren Boucher was being held in the Warren County Regional Jail in lieu of a five-thousand-dollar bond. The incident was first reported by the Bowling Green Daily News.

A news release issued by the Kentucky State Police post in Bowling Green didn’t provide details of the incident, but said Paul suffered minor injuries.

Lisa Autry

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is downplaying the indictment of President Trump’s former campaign manager.   Paul Manafort and an aide are the first to be criminally charged in the investigation into possible Russian influence in U.S. politics. 

Senator Paul says the charges have nothing to do with collusion with Russia and instead accuse Manafort of money laundering and not paying taxes before going ever joining the Trump campaign.

Rand Paul Calls Fellow Republican Senator a 'Warmonger'

Oct 24, 2017
WFPL

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky is calling GOP colleague Lindsey Graham a "warmonger" in a tweet that goes beyond a mere difference in worldviews.

Paul tweeted Monday "you know you are in too many wars in too many places when even warmonger Lindsay Graham can't keep track anymore."

Paul misspelled Graham's first name.

The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce is urging U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Bowling Green to support passage of the federal budget.

In a letter to Sen. Paul, the Chamber advocated lowering the corporate tax rate and simplifying the tax code. Spokesperson Kate Shanks said they wanted to make it clear that the business community supports making these steps toward tax reform, and the chamber is hoping the Bowling Green Republican will join them in those efforts.

Becca Schimmel

A health care policy advocated by U.S. Senator Rand Paul was signed by President Trump as an executive order Thursday. 

Paul, a Republican from Bowling Green, has been promoting the concept of 'association health plans' that allow Americans to purchase health insurance across state lines. Paul has been advocating for the plans in the White House, with Congress and across Kentucky.  

Paul said the president’s action approving association health plans is an important first step in moving away from the Affordable Care Act. 

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky appears to have notched a victory in the health care debate in Washington. 

A published report says President Trump will sign an executive order allowing Americans to purchase health insurance across state lines. 

Senator Paul has been a staunch advocate for association health plans which would allow small businesses to pool together across state lines through their membership in a trade or professional group to purchase health coverage for their employees and their families.

Becca Schimmel

Sen. Rand Paul said he still opposes the GOP’s most recent attempt to repeal elements of the Affordable Care Act, despite changes to the legislation over the weekend.

Paul is one of two Republican senators who came out against an earlier version of the Graham-Cassidy bill, which was tweaked over the weekend to send more Medicaid dollars to states whose senators have voiced opposition to the measure.

At an event in Louisville Monday, Paul called those last-minute changes “suspicious” and said the bill still doesn’t do enough to do away with Obamacare spending.

Republicans' complex health care calculations are coming down to simple math.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell needs 50 of the chamber's 52 Republicans to vote for a bill that aims to repeal most of the Affordable Care Act and drastically reshape the Medicaid system. McConnell's office is planning to bring the bill up for a vote next week.

Kentucky’s Republican U.S. Senators are on opposite sides in the latest attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. 

The bill by Senators Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy would give block grants to states to create their own health care systems.  The funding would replace Obamacare's tax credits and Medicaid expansion.  The measure would also repeal the individual and employer mandates. 

Speaking on the Senate floor, Kentucky Senator and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell praised the legislation for taking more decision-making power out of Washington.

Becca Schimmel

U.S. Senator Rand Paul said Congressional Republicans are shifting their focus away from health care after several failed attempts at repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. The Bowling Green Republican said healthcare is taking a backseat to tax reform this fall.

Sen. Paul expects tax reform to be at the forefront of Congress’ agenda. He said lawmakers need to figure out what government can do to allow businesses to grow and thrive.

“My goal is basically to have more money return to its rightful owners, the people who earned it. We have to have some taxes, we gotta have some government, but I think we need more money to remain in the economy,” Paul said.  

Pages