Rand Paul

As new voter ID laws take effect across the county, U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is maintaining his position that asking voters to produce identification before casting their ballot has no racial overtones. Paul told WKU Public Radio that voter ID provisions are needed to combat voter fraud and not doing so is a disservice to those who fought for the right to vote.

"Forty, 50 years ago when people were fighting for the right to vote, there were people beaten with clubs, there were people who fought for the Voting Rights Act, and at that time, African Americans weren't voting and weren't allowed to vote," said the Bowling Green Republican.

More states are enacting voter ID laws since the U.S. Supreme Court in June gutted a key provision of the Voting Rights Act that gave the federal government oversight of states with a history of voter discrimination. Sen. Paul says he hasn't seen any evidence that minorities are facing obstacles in voting.  In fact, he says in the last election, African Americans voted at a higher percentage than White Americans in states that were under special provisions of the federal government. 

His comments come as he urges the GOP to do more to attract minorities, and as opponents of the Supreme Court's decision on the Voting Rights Act point to various voter ID laws they say are designed to discourage election day turnout in minority communities.

Paul: GOP Big Enough to Accomodate Him, Chris Christie

Aug 19, 2013

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul says he and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will continue to disagree over national security and other issues, but the Republican Party is big enough to accommodate both men's views.

In an apparent shot at Christie, Paul says Sunday "there's room for people who believe in bigger government in our party." The New Jersey governor is considered a moderate whose views on government spending differ sharply from the libertarian Paul's.

The two men, potential rivals for president in 2016, have been sparring for weeks.

Paul told "Fox News Sunday" that Republicans should concentrate growing the party instead of bickering. He said the GOP "is shrinking almost down to nothing" in the Northeast, Christie's home base, and needs people with new ideas to attract independents and Democrats.

Kentucky’s junior U.S. Senator says he’s developing a “Republican alternative” to a Detroit bailout plan.

Speaking on the Glenn Beck radio show, Senator Paul said he is talking with his staff about ways to help economically depressed areas of the country, like Detroit. The Bowling Green Republican said he would like to look at ways to “have some tax forbearance, reduce some taxes, encourage businesses, encourage people to come in and take abandoned property.”

Politico reports Paul is opposed to the idea of borrowing money to bail out the city, but he is suggesting the government should redirect foreign aid sent to countries like Egypt, and instead use it on infrastructure projects in the U.S.

A national poll conducted by Quinnipiac University shows that a majority Democrats believe the federal government should bail out Detroit, but an even larger majority of Americans oppose such a move.

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Bowling Green joined On Point Tuesday to discuss his political philosophy, libertarianism, and the future of the Republican Party.

Paul is considered a key leader of the Tea Party wing of the GOP, and hasn't been shy about mixing it up with other prominent Republicans about issues like federal spending and N.S.A. surveillance.

You can find an audio archive later today of the Senator's On Point appearance here.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie doesn't appear to want his war of words with Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul to end anytime soon.

Christie fired back at Paul on Tuesday for Paul's remark that New Jersey has a "Gimme, gimme, gimme" attitude about federal aid for Superstorm Sandy.

The spat began when the two differed over warrantless surveillance programs. Paul is against them, while Christie says they are needed for national security.

At a news conference Tuesday to announce homeowner grants for northern New Jersey residents affected by Sandy, Christie suggested Paul look at cutting "pork barrel spending" in his home state if he's worried about defense cuts.

Christie says Kentucky gets back $1.51 for every dollar its sends to Washington, while New Jersey gets back 61 cents.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul hit back at New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in the two Republicans’ ongoing spat over national security.

Christie last week criticized Paul’s opposition to warrantless federal surveillance programs, saying it harmed efforts to prevent terrorism. Paul told reporters after speaking at a fundraiser outside Nashville on Sunday that Christie’s position hurts GOP chances in national elections, and that spending priorities of critics like the governor and Rep. Peter King of New York do more to harm national security.

“They’re precisely the same people who are unwilling to cut the spending, and their `Gimme, gimme, gimme — give me all my Sandy money now.’” Paul said, referring to federal funding after the hurricane last year. “Those are the people who are bankrupting the government and not letting enough money be left over for national defense.”

King in a phone interview late Sunday called Paul’s criticism of Sandy aid “indefensible.”

A letter sent to Kentucky Senator Rand Paul from the FBI says the bureau has used domestic drones for surveillance in ten cases since 2006. The letter came in response to a series of questions Sen. Paul asked the FBI regarding its drone use.

Sen. Paul says he will maintain a hold on the nomination of James Comey to be the next FBI Director. Senators can place holds on Presidential nominations, something that is often done to draw attention to a specific issue.

Paul says the FBI’s answers to his questions about domestic drone use are “insufficient”. The Bowling Green Republican has sent the bureau a follow-up letter with more questions.

Politico reports that in its response to Paul, the FBI says the agency has used domestic drones for surveillance in the U.S. in eight criminal cases and two national security cases since 2006.

A man who once wrote that he celebrates the birthday of Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth has resigned from the staff of Kentucky Senator Rand Paul.

Jack Hunter served as Paul’s director of new media and was a credited writer on Paul’s 2011 book “The Tea Party Goes to Washington.” Hunter also went by the nickname, the “Southern Avenger”, and in 2005 wrote that he raises “a personal toast every May 10th to celebrate John Wilkes Booth’s birthday.”

Speaking Monday in Louisville to a convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Sen. Paul said Hunter had become a “distraction”, and confirmed that Hunter was no longer a staff member. Hunter has recently said that statements he previously made as a radio and online pundit do "not accurately reflect me.”

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul says he's still waiting for FBI officials to answer questions about how the agency is using drones in the U.S.

Appearing Thursday on the public radio program The Takeaway (broadcast at Noon C.T. on WKU Public Radio), the Bowling Green Republican said he's disturbed by the recent admission by FBI leaders that they are using drones in this country without having privacy guidelines in place.

Paul told host John Hockenberry that he has sent the FBI a series of questions about the agency's use of drones, such as whether or not the FBI obtains search warrants before using the surveillance tactic.

Paul said the revelations about domestic drone use combined with the amount of information being collected by the National Security Agency should concern lawmakers and citizens alike.

Kentucky’s junior U.S. Senator says he will put a hold on James Comey’s nomination as FBI director. Bowling Green Republican Rand Paul wants the agency to answer questions regarding the use of drones for domestic surveillance.

Speaking on Fox News, Paul said his intention was not to defeat Comey’s nomination, but to “slow it down enough” to get answers from the Obama administration about drones monitoring American citizens on U.S. soil. Paul says until he gets those answers, he will place a formal hold on Comey’s nomination, a tactic that any Senator can use to prevent a nomination from moving forward.

In March, Paul held a 13-hour talking filibuster of CIA Director John Brennan’s nomination over similar concerns over domestic drone use.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul has introduced legislation that would cut off foreign aid to Egypt. Politico reports the bill is the first in Congress to directly address what many observers describe as a military coup in the north African nation.

For Paul, a Republican from Bowling Green, there’s no debating what happened in Egypt last week. He says President Mohammed Morsi was taken down by a military coup, and under U.S. law Congress can’t provide aid to countries where a democratically elected government has been removed by such an action.

In a statement, Senator Paul accused President Obama of ignoring the rule of law by refusing to call last week’s action a coup, and by continuing the flow of U.S aid to Egypt.

The President this week ordered a review of all aid sent to Egypt.

Paul has previously called on Congress to halt foreign aid to Pakistan, and is a general critic of foreign assistance, saying it’s money better spent at home.

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is telling FBI director Robert Mueller that he will object to the nomination of his successor until he gets answers on domestic drone use.

In a letter this week to Director Mueller, Senator Paul turns up the heat for an explanation of how the FBI uses surveillance drones on U.S. soil.  

“The American people have a right to know the limits that the federal government operates under when using these drones, and whether further action is needed to protect the rights of innocent Americans," writes Paul.

The letter is a follow-up to a previous letter sent on June 20 that asked for a response by July 1.  Senator Paul states in his latest correspondence that until he gets adequate answers to his questions, the Kentucky Republican will object to the nomination of James Comey as the next FBI director and encourage his colleagues to the do the same. 

Drone use is a hot-button issue for Paul, who in March, filibustered for 13 hours the nomination of CIA Director John Brennan over the use of domestic drones.

An aide to Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is coming under fire for his political views on race relations and more.

According to a report in The Washington Free Beacon, Jack Hunter, who co-authored Paul's first book and now serves in his Washington office, worked as a radio personality in South Carolina in the '90's using the name "The Southern Avenger". In that capacity, he expressed sympathy for President Lincoln's assassin, John Wilkes Booth, said slavery was not the cause of the Civil War, bashed Hispanic immigrants, and advocated secession for South Carolina.

He did repudiate some of his more controversial statements in the Free Beacon story, saying it was his job back in his radio days to "provoke and inflame", but that he now abhors racism and advocates equal protection under the law for all people. The story notes he did not rule out his support for secession.

Rand Paul Testing 2016 Waters During South Carolina Visit

Jun 28, 2013

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul says he’s hoping to show people in the early presidential primary state of South Carolina that he can appeal to a broad audience.

Paul spoke with The Associated Press prior to a Friday trip to South Carolina, home to the South’s first presidential primary balloting.

The 50-year-old freshman Republican and tea party favorite’s name is frequently mentioned as a possible 2016 presidential contender, and he’s made recent trips to other early primary states including Iowa and New Hampshire. He’s spending some time in South Carolina raising money and meeting with tea party-leaning groups.

State GOP chairman Matt Moore says South Carolina voters are eager to hear Paul’s conservative message. Moore says the state will host other potential 2016 White House hopefuls in the coming months.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul has suggested that Wednesday’s Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage will move the country closer to accepting marriages between people and animals.

A spokeswoman for the Bowling Green Republican insists the Senator was being sarcastic.

Paul’s comments came during an appearance on Glenn Beck’s radio program. Beck asked the Kentucky Senator if the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act would eventually lead to the legalization of polygamous marriage. Paul responded by saying, “I think it’s a conundrum. If we have no laws on this, people take it to one extension further, does it have to be humans, you know?”

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