Rand Paul

Lisa Autry

U.S. Senator Rand Paul says he has sympathy for Edward Snowden, the man who leaked information on the National Security Agency's surveillance operations. 

In Bowling Green this week, Paul was asked how history will judge Snowden, who's facing espionage charges. Sen. Paul said  Snowden never lied to anyone, unlike National Intelligence Director James Clapper, who lied under oath to Congress.

“He says 'I lied in the name of national security.'  On the other hand, Edward Snowden told the truth in defense of privacy, but broke his national security clearance.  When you work in government you take a pledge not to reveal secrets, but you also take a pledge to the Constitution," explained Paul.  "The question becomes 'Is it a type of accepted civil disobedience to break your security pledge in defense of the Constitution?'"

If it turns out he leaked secrets to foreign governments, Paul said Snowden would be judged harshly, but history would judge him kindly as a defender of privacy.

Lisa Autry

Decades later, the family of a Kentucky native and military veteran finally has the medals honoring his service.  Airman First Class Billy Hickey was a Korean War veteran who was held for nearly three years as a prisoner of war. 

U.S. Senator Rand Paul presented the medals to his son Colonel George Hickey in Bowling Green Monday.

“I never was able to get these medals and I'm very glad the senator was able to get them for me," said Hickey. 

Col. George Hickey was presented the Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal & Silver Star Attachment, and the United Nations Service Medal.

Senator Paul, whose family has a history in the Air Force, said being able to present the medals was gratifying.

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky has introduced a bill in Congress to block military funds to Syria.  The measure is aimed at preventing further U.S. involvement in the Syrian civil war. 

Senator Paul, a Republican from Bowling Green,  is co-sponsoring legislation that would ban direct or indirect aid for military operations in Syria, but would not prevent humanitarian aid. 

The bi-partisan legislation is also supported by Senators Tom Udall, Mike Lee, and Chris Murphy, all of whom have spoken out in opposition to President Obama’s decision to arm rebel groups in Syria. 

“The President’s unilateral decision to arm Syrian rebels is incredibly disturbing, considering what little we know about whom we are arming," said Paul.  "Engaging in yet another conflict in the Middle East with no vote or Congressional oversight compounds the severity of this situation. The American people deserve real deliberation by their elected officials before we send arms to a region rife with extremists who seek to threaten the U.S. and her allies.”

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is on a west-coast fundraising swing this week that includes stops at some of the country’s most well-known and respected technology companies.

Senator Paul is considering a 2016 presidential bid, and the Wall Street Journal reports this week’s visit to the west coast is part of his effort to reach out to groups not normally associated with the GOP.

Yesterday, Paul held a private town hall meeting for Google employees at the company’s Mountain View, California campus. The Bowling Green Republican is also making fundraising stops at Facebook and eBay.

Paul has been outspoken about the need for the Republican Party to reach out to groups that normally don’t vote for the GOP, including African-Americans and young people along the West Coast.

Paul says many employees at place like Google and Facebook are likely more fiscally conservative than President Obama, but are turned off by the GOP because they see the party as too far to the right on social issues.

Among voters in Iowa—a key primary state—U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is the strongest Republican in the field of prospective 2016  presidential candidates,  says a new poll by Quinnipiac University.

Kentucky's junior senator leads current Vice President Joe Biden by five points among Iowa voters— and he trails former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the presumed Democratic frontrunner, by only four points.

Those totals are better than Sen. Marco Rubio, the Floridian who is also a leading Republican contender for the 2016 presidential election.

In the Quinnipiac poll, Rubio barely edges Biden and trails Clinton by nine points.

The polling numbers come on heels of his keynote speech to Iowa Republicans weeks ago. But a major reason for Paul's strong standing in Iowa is his perception among Iowa's independent voters.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul says the Republican Party needs to “look like America.” Paul told the New Hampshire Republican State Committee Liberty Dinner Monday that the GOP needs to become more diverse in order to prosper.

“We need to be white, we need to be brown, we need to be black, we need to be with tattoos, without tattoos, with pony tails, without pony tails, with beard, without," said the Bowling Green Republican.

The Courier-Journal noted Paul’s appearance in New Hampshire also stokes further speculation that he is planting the seeds for a 2016 presidential run.

New Hampshire is the first state to hold a presidential primary every four years. Paul visited Iowa, home of the nation’s first caucuses, earlier this month, and appeared the early primary state of South Carolina in January.

Sen. Paul Says Impeachment Talk Premature

May 21, 2013

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul and the Republican National Committee chairman are distancing themselves from conservatives who suggested in recent days that President Barack Obama could face impeachment for the developing scandal at the Internal Revenue Service.

RNC chairman Reince Priebus said, “There’s a few chapters before we get to the last one.” He says it’s up to Republicans to “connect the dots” before calling for impeachment.

Asked about impeachment, Paul says investigators must learn more “before we go anywhere else.”

The Republican leaders addressed reporters before a Monday GOP fundraiser in Concord, N.H.

Paul is touring early-voting states while considering whether to run for president in 2016.

GOP Leaders Say Impeachment Talk Premature

May 21, 2013

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul and the Republican National Committee chairman are distancing themselves from conservatives who suggested in recent days the President Obama could face impeachment for the developing scandal at the Internal revenue Service.

RNC chairman Reince Priebus said, "There's a few chapters before we get to the last one." He says it's up to Republicans to "connect the dots" before calling for impeachment.

Asked about impeachment, Paul said investigators must learn more "before we go anywhere else."

The Republican leaders addressed reporters before a Monday GOP fundraiser in Concord, NH. Paul is touring early-voting states while considering whether to run for president in 2016.

Through a single piece of legislation, Sen. Rand Paul is hoping to cut a corporate tax and get more revenue for transportation projects.

Here's how: When American companies make money overseas and put it in foreign banks, they have to pay a tax to bring the money back to the U.S.  Paul is sponsoring legislation that lowers the tax companies pay to transfer foreign profits to America from 35 percent to 5 percent. Many of those companies keep that money overseas instead of paying the 35-percent tax.

The new tax revenue generated under Paul's proposal would be put into a transportation fund, which could benefit projects including the Ohio River Bridges and the Brent Spence Bridge in Northern Kentucky.

A  lot of money is sitting overseas, and a lower tax rate would entice companies to bring it home, Paul spokesman Dan Bayens said.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul Raising National Profile

May 10, 2013

Paul is doing more than just "considering" running for president as he's states, the Kentucky Republican is clearing a path to seek the 2016 Republican presidential nomination with a series of upcoming early primary state visits, a beefed up political operation and a plan to raise his profile.

His first major appearance is Friday night when he's scheduled to be the featured guest at the Iowa Republican Party's annual spring fundraiser. That's considered a plum speaking gig in the state expected to host the leadoff caucuses.

Paul's road is expected to be far from easy, given other big names in the prospective field and the national GOP's wide divide. But he enjoys tea party backing and access to his father Ron Paul's past presidential campaign networks.

Rand Paul heads to New Hampshire later this month and to South Carolina in June, two other early primary states.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is lending his name to a conservative gun rights group that's targeting fellow Republicans.

The group, the National Association for Gun Rights, is running ads against two Congressmen in Virginia, including House Minority leader Eric Cantor, saying they gave in too easily to President Obama's gun control measures. They also say the National Rifle Association is too willing to compromise on gun rights.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is scheduled to headline the Iowa Republican party’s Lincoln Day Dinner in May. While members of Congress often take part in speaking engagements in other states, Sen. Paul’s appearance in Iowa is making news because the event always creates buzz about the upcoming presidential race.

The Hawkeye State has been a traditional launching pad for presidential candidates from both parties, given that the Iowa caucuses serve as the country’s first major electoral event in the presidential nominating process.

Paul, a Bowling Green Republican, has admitted he is considering a run for the White House in 2016, and attracted a lot of popular press in conservative circles when he launched a 13-hour filibuster earlier this month against the nomination of John Brennan to be C.I.A. chief.

Earlier this week, Paul told the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce that the country needs to find a way to give legal status to undocumented immigrants working in the U.S. While stopping short of saying there should be a pathway to citizenship for such workers, Paul’s latest statements were much more moderate than his previous positions on immigration.

Kentucky U.S. Senator Rand Paul won the presidential straw poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference, narrowly beating fellow Senator Marco Rubio of Florida.

According to Politico, Paul received 25 percent of the vote at CPAC Saturday, with Rubio taking 23 percent of the nearly 3,000 ballots cast.

Former Pennsylvania Senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum was third.

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky launched a nationwide conversation last week with his 13-hour filibuster of the president's nominee to lead the CIA.

Paul vowed to keep talking until the White House clarified whether it has authority to kill U.S. citizens on American soil with drones.

Update at 12:52 p.m.:

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul is filibustering the nomination of John Brennan as the next C.I.A director.

Paul, a Bowling Green Republican, is expressing his displeasure with Brennan's testimony on the issue of the possible use of drones by the U.S. government to attack citizens on American soil.

Paul is also upset with a letter sent to him by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. In the letter, Holder said the President had the right to order drone strikes against American citizens in the U.S.

Speaking on the floor of the Senate Wednesday, Paul said "no one person, no one politician should be allowed to judge the guilt, to charge an individual, to judge the guilt of an individual and to execute an individual. It goes against everything that we fundamentally believe in our country."

Original post:

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul is blasting Attorney General Eric Holder's statement that President Obama could order the use of deadly force against an American inside the United States. The claim came in a letter Holder sent to Kentucky U.S. Sen. Rand Paul that was released Tuesday.

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