Regional

Flickr/Creative Commons/John Bratseth

Citizen Foster Care Review Boards in 22 Kentucky counties are searching for volunteers.

Board members review the cases of children who have been put in foster care because of dependency, abuse, or neglect.  Volunteers complete a six-hour training session and must consent to a to criminal record and Central Registry check.

More information and application materials can be found here.

Dolores Smith is a unit supervisor with the review board program. She says the boards are looking for volunteers from many different backgrounds.

“The number one thing we look for is someone who has a genuine concern for child welfare—that’s the overriding feature,” Smith said. “Kentucky statutes also mention that we look for different professions, like education, social work, psychology, medical, and legal fields.”

Powers Remembered as Kentucky Political Trailblazer

Feb 6, 2016
Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

Georgia Davis Powers' funeral turned into a celebration of a life that broke down barriers as a civil-rights icon and the first African-American woman elected to the Kentucky Senate.

The Courier-Journal reports the celebration Friday in Louisville included the reading of a letter from President Barack Obama and remembrances from religious leaders.

Powers died last Saturday at the age of 92.

Among those attending were U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, Lexington Mayor Jim Gray and Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

She helped organize civil rights marches in Kentucky, including the 1964 march in Frankfort to bring attention to the need for a law prohibiting discrimination in housing.

Powers served 21 years in the state Senate, fighting for African-Americans, women, the poor, the disabled, the disenfranchised.

DCL/Keith Barraclough

A popular TV show featuring rescue dogs from across the country will have a Kentucky connection.

Two dogs from the Barktown Rescue animal shelter in Nelson County are participating in the 12th annual Puppy Bowl. The show airs Sunday afternoon on Animal Planet, ahead of the Super Bowl.

It’s the second year in a row that pooches from the facility in Boston, Ky., have competed in the program that encourages pet lovers to adopt from their local shelter.

The program was taped last fall.

The two Barktown Rescue puppies appearing in this year’s show are a lab mix named Gunner, and a terrier mix named Shylah.

Both dogs have been adopted since the show was taped.

Barktown vice president Heather Nelson helped drive the dogs from Kentucky to New York City to record the show in October.

Glasgow Independent Schools

Glasgow Police have made two arrests in connection with a Wednesday shooting incident.

Twenty-three year old Jaleel Wood was arrested at his workplace Thursday night and charged with attempted murder and two counts of first-degree wanton endangerment.

Twenty-seven-year-old Mary Ash was charged with attempted murder after turning herself into police Friday morning.

Both Wood and Ash are from Glasgow.

Police have an arrest warrant issued for 22-year old Anthony Wood of Glasgow, and are actively searching for him.

Three Glasgow city schools were placed on a soft lockdown Wednesday after 911 callers reported passengers in two cars exchanging gunfire.

No one was injured, and the lockdown was quickly lifted.

Glasgow Independent Schools

Three Glasgow city schools were placed on a soft lockdown Wednesday afternoon after police received calls about passengers in two vehicles exchanging gunfire.

Several callers to 911 said the gunfire took place on Columbia Avenue, not far from Glasgow High School, Middle School, and Highland Elementary.

No students were harmed.

Police were not able to locate the vehicles, but recovered evidence from the scene of the shooting.

The vehicles believed to be involved in the incident are a black Ford Crown Victoria, and a goldor tan Chevy Malibu.

Investigators are asking anyone with information about the shooting to contact the Glasgow Police Department, at 270-651-5151.

Joe Corcoran

Bowling Green mayor Bruce Wilkerson is adding the title of college president to his resume.

Daymar College announced Wednesday that Wilkerson will lead their campus in Bowling Green.

He’ll continue as the city’s mayor.

The Owensboro-based school’s campus in Warren County had 214 students enrolled last year, and produced 133 graduates.

Wilkerson said he’ll focus on the quality of students, not quantity.

“Numbers aren’t the important part," the Bowling Green Mayor said. "Our focus will be on the individual student and making sure they have the opportunity to meet the goals they’ve set for themselves. We hope that in doing that, the reputation of Daymar will lead us to grow.”

Daymar’s reputation took a hit in 2014 when it was sued by then-Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway for alleged violations of the state’s Consumer Protection Act.

A religious group building a massive Noah’s Ark tourist attraction in Kentucky has won a legal battle over the state’s withdrawal of a potential tax incentive worth millions.

A federal judge ruled Monday that Kentucky officials violated the ark builders’ First Amendment protections by blocking it from the sales tax tourism incentive that could have been worth up to $18 million.

The Ark Encounter, being built by Christian group Answers in Genesis, is due to open in July.

U.S. District Judge Gregory Van Tatenhove ruled the state’s Tourism Cabinet cannot exclude the ark attraction from the incentive based on its “religious purpose and message.” The state initially celebrated the project but reversed course in late 2014.

Answers in Genesis founder Ken Ham says the ruling is a “victory for the free exercise of religion in this country.”

Last week’s winter storm set a record in Bowling Green.  Friday’s snowfall was the third unusually large snowstorm to impact the region in the past 12 months. 

The 12.2-inch snowfall was the third largest single-day snowfall in Bowling Green history dating back to 1893.  State Climatologist Stuart Foster at WKU said the snow also came on the heels of nearly ten inches in February 2015 and more than seven inches last March.

"Those came with a lot of complicating factors in terms of some frigid temperatures and then after one of those events, we had a lot of rain on top of that," Foster said.  "While we had a lot of snow this time, we kind of dodged a bullet too."

During the peak of Friday’s snow storm, more than seven inches of snow fell in a six-hour period between 7:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. 

Eastern portions of the state also posted some impressive snowfall amounts of up to 22 inches.  Accumulations were much lower in western Kentucky.

Kentucky LRC

A top Democrat in the Kentucky House says he will not seek re-election.

Johnny Bell of Glasgow plans to retire from the General Assembly after eight years. 

The House Majority Whip says the political atmosphere in federal and state legislatures has changed, and it’s more about politics than about serving the people. The 50-year-old Bell serves Barren and a portion of Warren County. 

His announcement comes as Democrats hold a narrow 50-46 majority in the Kentucky House with four seats up for grabs in a special election March 8. 

Glasgow Attorney Danny Basil and City Councilman Joe Trigg, both Democrats, will run for Bell’s seat along with Republicans Freddie Joe Wilkerson and Steve Riley.

Tuesday is the filing deadline for candidates seeking office this year.

Investigators in Pulaski County are trying to determine what caused a fire that destroyed a farmhouse and killed two people.

Pulaski County Public Safety Director Tiger Robinson tells local media outlets that the fire occurred Sunday afternoon at a house about a mile and a half off the road.

The names of the victims had not been released as of Sunday night, but Robinson says the victims were a man and a woman.

Robinson says snow and ice made it difficult for crews to reach the structure, but the delay did not make much of a difference.

Kevin Willis

Classes at all WKU campuses have been canceled Monday. Offices will remain open.

Here is the latest update on road condition from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet office in Bowling Green, released Sunday morning:

After making headway on many Priority A routes yesterday, single digit temperatures have caused any water left on the roadways that were clear to freeze overnight. This has created icy patches, some of them large, that could be hard to see for motorists. Also patches of coverage still remain on some priority A routes.

Salting operations were halted last night due to the frigid temperatures, but plowing operations were out in force. Crews were able to plow Priority B and some Priority C routes overnight and will continue to do so today. Temperatures are predicted to be above freezing today with sunshine which will be a tremendous help to clearing roadways. As temperatures begin to rise, salting operations will resume. As the ice and snow left on the roadways begin to melt throughout the day slushy conditions can be expected along with water on the roadways.

Most roadways still have hazardous conditions on them, especially at intersections. Crews will continuing working around the clock in shifts to get the roads cleared.

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

A Kentucky Transportation Cabinet employee has died while plowing highways in Christian County, according to KYTC spokesman Keith Todd.

Todd identified the employee as Christopher Adams. Adams started his shift around midnight Saturday. Todd reports Adams had called his supervisor around 5:50 a.m. Saturday to report his plow had slid off KY 115.

Adams was found slumped over his seat and unresponsive by his supervisor.

Following a response from area paramedics, Adams was pronounced dead by the county coroner. Adams had worked for the cabinet for 16 years.

A massive snowstorm that affected most of the East Coast finally ended Sunday morning, leaving in its wake 1-3 feet of snow over major cities, at least 18 storm-associated casualties and severe coastal flooding.

While the snow has stopped, the weather warnings continue. High winds will create blowing and drifting snow in some areas, the National Weather Service warns. And while New York City lifted a police-enforced travel ban on Sunday morning, many authorities are asking citizens to refrain from driving for another day as efforts to clear off the roads continue.

Lance Dennee / WKMS

The AP is reporting that I-75 in eastern Kentucky has been reopened Saturday afternoon following the winter storm that hit the state Friday.

Some motorists were stranded on the interstate for hours. An official tells the AP there were no injuries related to the traffic standstill.

Update at 10:00 a.m.:

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet office in Elizabethtown issued the following update on road conditions throughout the region Saturday:

With snow and ice teams working around the clock since late Thursday night, most primary routes in District 4 have improved greatly since accumulating precipitation ended and moved east. I-65, Western Kentucky Parkway and Bluegrass Parkway are all open but traffic continues moving at a slower than normal pace.

U.S. highways such as 31-W, 31-E, 60, 62 and 150 are still covered in many places, particularly in our eastern counties where snow accumulation totals are between 12 and 15 inches.

Secondary roads which include many state routes are still mostly covered.  These will be a major focus for snow and ice teams today.  Crews will continue to plow roads and treat where possible.  Sunshine will be very favorable to improving road conditions.  Crews will work into the evening, but with temperatures forecast generally close to zero around the region, chemical treatments will be ineffective.  After plowing is complete today, treatment will resume on Sunday.

The snow will glow white on the mountains tonight — the Appalachians, that is, from North Carolina through Pennsylvania.

The wind is howling — gusts over 60 miles per hour in some areas, the National Weather Service reports — as this swirling storm moves up the coast.

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