Defying legal decisions that go all the way up to the U.S. Supreme Court, Kim Davis, the Rowan County, Ky.., clerk, continued to deny marriage licenses on Wednesday in protest of same-sex marriage.

As Kentucky Public Radio's Ryland Barton reports, Davis, who has become a divisive figure in the national debate on same-sex marriage, has been summoned to a federal court on Thursday for a hearing on whether to hold her in contempt.

With that, here's what we know about Davis:

A substitute teacher for the Bowling Green Independent School District is under arrest on child pornography charges. 

A letter that went out Wednesday to staff and parents says Leon Lussier was suspended from employment indefinitely while he is under federal investigation. 

According to Superintendent Gary Fields, Lussier passed background checks before he was hired in 2012.

"On all of our employees, we do state and federal criminal background checks," Fields told WKU Public Radio.  "There were no red flags on those reports, as well as professional references that applicants have to complete, as well."

Fields said the 49-year-old Lussier has worked in all schools buildings in the district, but there’s no indication any of his victims were students.  It's also unlikely that Lussier received or viewed images while on school grounds.

"Our substitute teachers do not have access to logging into the computers or have any access to technology while they're in the building," explained Fields.

Lussier holds both bachelor’s and master’s degrees and has been in education since 1998. 

He was arrested at his home Tuesday and taken to the Warren County Regional Jail.  Lussier is scheduled to appear Friday in U.S. District Court in Bowling Green.

Update 9:10 p.m.: Beshear’s Statement

In a statement Tuesday afternoon, Gov. Steve Beshear said “117 of our 120 county clerks are following the law and carrying out their duty to issue marriage licenses regardless of gender.”

Here’s his full statement:

A district judge in Warren County has agreed to serve a one-month suspension from the bench following an investigation by the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission. 

The probe found that Judge Sam Potter, Junior’s alcohol dependency affected his job performance.  According to the commission, he appeared in court disheveled and engaged in erratic behavior. 

Potter’s attorney Charles English said while public officials are held to a higher standard, anyone call fall victim to alcohol addiction.

"Even judges are subject to this disease," English told WKU Public Radio.  "Judge Potter unfortunately became an alcoholic, but he's gone through a treatment program now, and fortunately he's cured."

Judge Potter returned to the bench July 1, and English says he has been performing admirably.  Under an agreement with the Judicial Conduct Commission, Potter will serve an unpaid suspension for 30 days beginning December 15.

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continues to deny marriage licenses to couples, one day after the Supreme Court refused to stay a decision ordering her to do so. As a result, Davis now risks being held in contempt of a federal court order.

Rowan County residents David Moore and David Ermold were again denied a marriage license at the Rowan County Clerk’s office Tuesday morning. County Clerk Kim Davis says God’s authority permits her to refuse to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. She’s also refusing to issue licenses to heterosexual couples to avoid being accused of discrimination, she says.

“I’m willing to face my consequences as you all will face your consequences when it comes time for judgment,” Davis said.

Late Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court denied Davis's appeal of a preliminary injunction to resume issuing marriage licenses. Davis stopped issuing the forms after the high court legalized same-sex marriage in June. Davis could now be held in contempt of U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning’s order to resume issuing marriage licenses.

Pulaski County state senator Chris Girdler wants to change time.

The Somerset republican wants all Kentucky counties bordering Lake Cumberland to be in the Eastern time zone to better accommodate tourism.

The Somerset “Commonwealth Journal” reports Girdler sent a letter to officials in a six county region wanting Clinton, Cumberland and Russell Counties to leave the Central time zone and join Pulaski, McCreary and Wayne counties in moving an hour ahead.

Wayne County made the switch just a few years ago.

Girdler says most of the population around Lake Cumberland is already in the Eastern time zone, as is Kentucky’s largest city, Louisville.

He says having all the counties within the same time zone would improve promotion of Lake Cumberland and the interaction among the counties.

A former police officer and school administrator from Grayson County has pleaded guilty to violating federal and state sex abuse laws, according to a press release from the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of Kentucky. 

Stephen Miller was a police officer in Leitchfield when he resigned from his job following complaints of inappropriate conduct toward women.  The 45-year-old Miller then began working at Bluegrass Challenge Academy, a residential, educational program run by the Kentucky National Guard and located at Fort Knox. 

Miller had supervisory authority over the students.  He pleaded guilty to engaging in abusive sexual conduct with three female students and sodomy with a fourth student.  The incident occurred at the academy over a six-month period in 2013.  Miller faces up to 11 years in prison at his sentencing in November. 

John Smith, who was director of the Bluegrass Challenge Academy, is under indictment for failure to report child abuse.

The Morehead News

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis will have to resume issuing marriage licenses while she is being sued by four local couples who were denied licenses, according to a ruling Wednesday from the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.  Davis’ defense team is appealing that decision.

In its ruling, the three-judge appeals court panel said there was “little or no likelihood that the Clerk in her official capacity will prevail on appeal.”

Davis’ defense lawyers say they will appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Davis is represented by Liberty Counsel, a non-profit law firm that specializes in religious freedom cases. Its founder and chairman, Mat Staver, says that even though she’s a government official, Davis’ religious freedoms should be upheld. “The implication is that if you work at a government agency you don’t have any religious freedom rights. If that’s the implication that’s staggering and that’s a startling proposition.”

Davis stopped issuing marriage licenses after the Supreme Court legalized same sex marriage.

Jacob Ryan, WFPL

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade.

By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history.

“It’s not anything to do about any racism or anything like that,” said Wathen, who also sells sock hats, stickers and patches with the Confederate battle emblem.

But the flag won’t be Wathen’s top seller at next year’s Kentucky State Fair.

The Kentucky State Fair Board voted this summer to ban the sale of the Confederate flag emblem at the fair. Several state agencies throughout the South removed Confederate symbols following a mass shooting at a historic black church in South Carolina.

The fair board’s full ban won’t go into effect until 2016; nearly every vendor this year had already signed a contract and paid as much $500 in deposit fees prior to the fair board’s vote.

Flickr/Creative Commons/John Bratseth

Dozens of counties in Kentucky are in need of volunteers to serve on foster care review boards.

The boards consider the cases of children placed in foster care because of dependency, neglect, and abuse. State law mandates that there be at least three volunteers on each board, although more are often needed due to heavy caseloads.

Dolores Smith, an Owensboro-based supervisor with the Department of Family and Juvenile Services, says the state laws creating the foster care review boards cast a wide net in terms of who is qualified to serve.

“(The statutes) mention folks with backgrounds in education, medicine, law, social work, and psychology,” Smith said. “But the overwhelming area they mention is that volunteers should have a genuine concern for child welfare.”

The goal of the foster care review boards, Smith said, is to find a safe, permanent home for children placed in the state’s custody.