Regional

Fort Campbell

More than 7,000 combat boots are being displayed at the 101st Airborne Division headquarters at Fort Campbell, honoring active duty service members who have died since the 9/11 attacks.

The display is being held during Military Survivor Appreciation Week, and the 101st and Fort Campbell Survivor Outreach Services also plan a "Run for the Fallen" on Friday.

The boots will be on display Thursday through Sunday. The post said each boot is adorned with a photo of a service member who has died since the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

The boots have been collected from military service members across Fort Campbell and abroad.

Morale, Welfare and Recreation engineer Thomas Kirkham says the boots are being arranged to be reminiscent of Arlington National Cemetery.

A former Georgia physician has pleaded guilty in federal court to illegally providing pain medication to thousands of Kentuckians.

Fifty-eight-year-old Michael Johnston appeared in U.S. District Court in Kentucky Thursday and admitted he conspired with the owner of a Georgia pain clinic to distribute Oxycodone and Xanax to residents of several Kentucky counties, including Laurel, Rockcastle, Pulaski, and Whitley. 

The former doctor acknowledged he ignored the fact the patients were addicts and likely selling the drugs for profit upon their return to Kentucky.  Many of the patients at the clinic were seen by non-physicians and received little or no medical examination before being prescribed pain pills.  The clinic operated on a cash-only basis and Johnston said he was encouraged to see as many patients per day, as possible. 

Johnston will serve ten years in prison after his sentencing in January.

National Corvette Museum

The head of the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green is being recognized for growing the Museum’s membership and guiding it through the aftermath of last year’s sink-hole collapse.

Wendell Strode is one of three Kentucky Nonprofit Network award winners…he’ll receive the Distinguished Nonprofit Leadership Award at a ceremony in Lexington October 28th.

The awards committee noted Strode’s efforts to grow the museum’s membership and visitors resulted in a 35-million dollar economic impact to the local and state economy.

He’s also being recognized for using the collapse of the floor in the Museum’s Skydome  as an opportunity to attract world-wide media attention and setting record museum attendance during repairs.

An outside audit says Big Rivers Electric Corp. should consider selling power plants that it doesn't need after losing its two largest customers.

Local media outlets report the audit was released Tuesday by the Kentucky Public Service Commission.

The independent review suggests that the company should explore the sale of both the D.B. Wilson power plant in Centertown and the Kenneth C. Coleman plant in Hawesville.

The audit says that Big Rivers will need to "move more aggressively in coming years" to mitigate the loss of the Century Aluminum smelters in Hawesville and Sebree.

In an email, company spokesman Marty Littrel told the Messenger-Inquirer newspaper that Big Rivers couldn't comment on the audit report.

Big Rivers is owned by three distribution cooperatives, which serve about 112,000 customers in western Kentucky.

One of the best vegetable gardens in Owensboro is growing in one of the most unlikely places. The two and a half acre garden has been turning out bushels full of tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, corn and cucumbers inside the walls of the Daviess County Detention Center.

Joe Corcoran visited the jail and reports the tons of vegetables are helping the inmates in more ways than one.

Versailles might be the next central Kentucky city to consider an ordinance prohibiting discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations based on sexual orientation or gender identity

The Versailles City Council on Tuesday will hear from a member of the Versailles-Midway-Woodford County Human Rights Commission who will encourage the city to adopt the ordinance.

Versailles Mayor Brian Traugott says he will ask the city's administrative and legal committee, chaired by council member Carl Ellis, to draft the ordinance.

On June 1, Midway became the eighth city in the state to adopt an anti-bias ordinance. Other cities that have passed similar laws are Lexington, Louisville, Covington, Danville, Frankfort, Morehead and Vicco in Perry County.

A semi crash occurred Friday morning near Mile Point 70 in the southbound lanes of I-65 in Hart County.  The vehicle came to rest behind guardrail and is over an embankment of the construction zone.

According to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, emergency crews are attempting to keep one interstate lane open as much as possible but intermittent full closures will be necessary.

The Exit 71 Southbound on-ramp is restricted to emergency vehicles only.      

It is expected to take several hours to clear the scene.

Motorists traveling through should consider using Exit 91 to the Western Kentucky Parkway and Natcher Parkway as a route to re-join I-65 in Bowling Green.

Motorists needing local access should consider US 31W.

The Vatican says Pope Francis' meeting with Kim Davis "should not be considered a form of support of her position."

After days of confusion, the Vatican issued a statement Friday clarifying Francis' Sept. 24 meeting with Davis, a county clerk in Kentucky who has become a focal point in the gay marriage debate in the U.S. because of her refusal to sign marriage licenses for gay couples.

The Vatican said Francis met with many people during his U.S. stay, due to his "kindness and availability."

The statement said: "The pope did not enter into the details of the situation of Mrs. Davis and his meeting with her should not be considered a form of support of her position in all of its particular and complex aspects."

UPDATE: 7:35 a.m.

Century Aluminum is planning to keep at least a portion of its Hawesville Smelter in western Kentucky open after announcing plans to close the plant in August.

The Messenger-Inquirer in Owensboro reports in a statement Wednesday, the company said that the plant will continue operating at about 40 percent capacity after Oct. 24. Company officials had originally planned to shut down the smelter on that date, citing a stagnant aluminum market and low prices for Chinese aluminum.

The company now says it will keep two pot lines operating at the plant.

There are about 565 employees at the Hawesville plant. The company didn't say how many workers would be retained for the two pot lines.

Century Aluminum's spokesman Kenny Barkley couldn't be reached for comment by the newspaper Wednesday.

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear's lawyers are using the words "absurd," ''forlorn" and "obtuse" to describe the legal arguments a county clerk has used to avoid issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

Rowan County clerk Kim Davis filed a lawsuit against the governor, alleging he violated her religious freedom by asking clerks to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court's decision that effectively legalized gay marriage across the nation. Beshear reiterated a request Tuesday that a judge toss the suit.

Davis spent five days in jail for defying a series of federal court orders to issue the licenses.

She has blamed Beshear for her legal woes, alleging that he "commandeered" her office when he instructed clerks to follow the court's decision.

Beshear's lawyer, Palmer G. Vance, described Davis' continued legal battle as a "meritless assault on the rule of law."

Bowling Green Police are warning area residents of a phone scam. 

Someone is contacting customers of Bowling Green Municipal Utilities and claiming their power will be disconnected unless they pay a fee. 

Bowling Green Police Public Information Officer Ronnie Ward says these types of scams are fairly common. 

"The Warren County electric department has also had this happen," Ward told WKU Public Radio.  "I had one person tell me their phone company told them they were going to cut their service off it they didn't pay the late fee."

Ward says if anyone receives such a call, hang up and contact the company the caller claims to be representing to verify the information. 

According to BGMU, the utility does not contact customers by phone and all correspondence is done through the mail.

The Morehead News

The Kentucky clerk who was jailed for refusing to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples says Pope Francis told her to stay strong when the two met briefly during his visit to the United States last week.

The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, didn't deny the encounter took place but said Wednesday in Rome he had no comment on it.

In an interview with ABC, Rowan County clerk Kim Davis says they hugged during the meeting last Thursday and the pope thanked her for her courage.

Davis, an Apostolic Christian, spent five days in jail earlier this month for defying a federal court order to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

In the ABC interview, which aired Wednesday morning, Davis said knowing the pope agreed with her validates her efforts.

Kentucky State Police say a 5-year-old boy has been fatally struck by a school bus in Butler County.

State police spokesman B.J. Eaton said that police were called around 3:20 p.m. CDT Monday to the scene on Kentucky 70 about four miles west of Morgantown.

Eaton says the child was hit at his scheduled stop after the Butler County school bus stopped in front of a residence to let children exit.

Butler County Coroner Marty Jones says the child was pronounced dead about 15 minutes later. The boy was identified as five year old Jayden Hawkins of Morgantown.

A statement from Butler County schools said the driver of the school bus has been employed by the school system for 18 years and has "an exemplary driving record with the district."

Dylan Lovan,AP

Kentucky firefighters who died in the line of duty will be honored at a memorial service this week in Frankfort.

The annual Fallen Firefighters Memorial service is set for 11 a.m. Wednesday at Juniper Hills Park.

Kentucky's Fallen Firefighter Memorial includes more than 200 names of firefighters who died in the line of duty. Two more names of fallen firefighters will be added to the wall this year. They include Anthony Grider of the Campbellsville Fire Department who came too close to power lines during an ALS Ice Bucket Challenge last summer on Campbellsville University's campus and Malcolm Jenkins of the Fern Creek Fire Department.

The service will include a wreath-laying to honor fallen firefighters.

The annual Red Helmets Courage Ride, a motorcycle tribute to firefighters who made the ultimate sacrifice, will begin at Frankfort Fire and EMS Station Number 3 prior to the service.

RGA Stops Running TV Ads in Kentucky Governor's Race

Sep 28, 2015

The Republican Governor's Association has stopped running TV ads for Matt Bevin in Kentucky with a little more than a month to go until Election Day.

The association has spent $3 million on six ads for Bevin, mostly attacking his Democratic opponent, Jack Conway, for supporting the policies of Democratic President Barack Obama. Association spokesman Jon Thompson said the group is evaluating its strategy and could go back on the air before November.

The move is a blow for Bevin, who has aired just one TV ad after spending more than $1 million of his own money to win a four-way Republican primary in May. A spokeswoman for Bevin said the campaign plans to start running a second TV ad on Wednesday and is in production for a third.

Pages