Trey Grayson

Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Trey Grayson is leaving the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce.  The former Republican politician says he is “looking at other options,” but has not yet decided on his next career move. 

Grayson has served as president and CEO of Chamber since 2014. 

“Trey has accomplished many great things as the leader of our Chamber and presided over one of the best legislative sessions for Kentucky businesses in recent history,” said Brent Cooper, who will serve as interim president of the Chamber. “I know I speak for the entire Chamber membership and staff as well as the Northern Kentucky community when I say that we are extremely grateful that Trey came back home to lead our organization.”

Harvard University

Former Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson is returning to the commonwealth to lead the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 

Grayson recently resigned as director of the Harvard University Institute of Politics.

In a phone interview Thursday, Grayson told WKU Public Radio that becoming president of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce was the perfect job to come home to.  He said thinks his two terms as secretary of state and his Frankfort and Washington connections will serve him well.                                   

"Somebody in the interview process referred to me as having the best of both worlds where I am a local with some local knowledge, but I also know how Washington and Frankfort works, and how a big city like Boston operates," commented Grayson.

"While he has the flavor of our local community, he brings to us a much wider national perspective," remarked Chamber Chairwoman Debbie Simpson."There are issues that any business organization is dealing with.  People are doing business differently today and our organizations have to adjust to fit that, and I think the fresh perspective that Trey is bringing back will really help us meet those challenges," added Simpson.

Northern Kentucky is facing a couple of immediate challenges, including the aging Brent Spence Bridge and the closing of Toyota’s corporate headquarters.