tuition rates

The big idea in President Obama's new proposal for tackling the growing crisis in college affordability can be boiled down to this: linking federal higher education aid to a new grading system that would rate colleges and universities on the "value" they provide students.

As WKU prepares for budget cuts ahead of the next fiscal year, another Kentucky university is making plans ahead of its next budget.

The Eastern Kentucky University board of regents has approved a spending plan that includes a three-percent in-state undergraduate tuition increase and no raises for employees. The three-percent tuition hike is the maximum allowed by the Council on Postsecondary Education.

WKU President Gary Ransdell had asked the CPE for a five-percent undergraduate tuition increase, saying it was needed to help the school move forward without budget cuts.

Dr. Ransdell says WKU will now have to look at cuts that will include personnel reductions. WKU vice-presidents have given Ransdell preliminary plans for cuts in their departments.

The issue will be taken up by the school’s board of regents at their meeting in late June.

At the conclusion of this morning's WKU Board of Regents Meeting, University President Dr. Gary Ransdell said University officials will recommend a tuition increase of less than five percent for in-state, undergraduate students. The Council on Postsecondary Education recently put a cap of 5 percent on tuition increases at WKU for next fall.

The Council on Post Secondary Education has approved a tuition increase of up to six percent for students attending the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville this fall. Board members also approved a tuition hike of up to five percent for students attending WKU and other comprehensive universities in the bluegrass state.