University of Louisville

J. Tyler Franklin

Less than two weeks after he announced he would dissolve and reconstitute the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees, Gov. Matt Bevin on Tuesday received nominees for the positions. And on Wednesday, his announced his choices.

The governor’s Postsecondary Education Nominating Committee offered 30 candidates to fill 10 positions. The governor’s office did not release the names to the public, although WFPL has sought the list through an open records request.

On Wednesday, the governor’s office released the names of his 10 appointees to the board. They are characterized by people at the highest levels of business and entrepreneurship in and around Louisville.

Here they are:

J. Tyler Franklin

Attorney General Andy Beshear is suing Gov. Matt Bevin for abolishing and then reinstating the boards of trustees of both the University of Louisville and Kentucky Retirement Systems, the state agency that manages the pensions of most state employees.

Bevin appointed new members and changed the number of seats on each panel. In both cases, Bevin said the moves were made to achieve a “fresh start.”

Bevin has reorganized several boards in recent months, including the Kentucky Horse Park Commission, Kentucky Racing Commission and the Workers’ Compensation Nominating Commission.

A group of labor unions and injured workers have sued Bevin for his overhaul of the workers’ compensation board, which nominates administrative law judges to oversee workers’ compensation cases.

Jacob Ryan, WFPL

A judge says Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer can remove a confederate monument near the University of Louisville campus.

The mayor and U of L President James Ramsey announced plans to remove the statue in late April, but a group headed up by the Sons of Confederate Veterans challenged the move, saying the monument was protected as a designated historical object.

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell called the group’s legal arguments “dishonest.”

“There wasn’t a single shred of evidence to support any of their allegations,” O’Connell said. “The entire thing was a sham.”

Alix Mattingly

University of Louisville’s president and its entire governing board are out.

With scandals mounting and dissent growing, Gov. Matt Bevin announced the major shake-up at the University of Louisville Friday morning. U of L President James Ramsey agreed to resign, the governor said, and Bevin used an executive order to dissolve and reconstitute the state-appointed Board of Trustees that oversees the institution.

What is going on at U of L?

Ramsey and his governing board have been at odds for months.

The U of L board has been floating a no-confidence vote for Ramsey, but a legal battle over the racial composition of the board prevented them from taking any action.

J. Tyler Franklin

A major shakeup in leadership is taking place at the University of Louisville.

Governor Matt Bevin today announced that University of Louisville President James Ramsey is stepping down and the school’s Board of Trustees is being reorganized.

Bevin said the school needs a change in oversight and a “fresh start.”

Ramsey has led U of L since 2002.

He’s come under increasing criticism as the school has faced several high-profile scandals, including an FBI investigation into its top health care executive, and an NCAA investigation into allegations that men’s basketball players and recruits were provided with prostitutes.

The Council on Postsecondary Education will nominate new trustees for Bevin to consider for appointment.

WKU Student Shot Near U of L After Party

May 31, 2016
University of Louisville

A Western Kentucky University student home for summer break has been struck at random by gunfire that broke out after a party near the University of Louisville campus.

News outlets report 19-year-old Eriaun Warrick was upgraded to serious condition from critical condition early Monday.

Warrick was shot in the mouth early Sunday, with the bullet becoming lodged in her upper back.

Warrick's friend Sasha Snardon tells the Courier-Journal that she was leaving the party with Warrick when they came across a large group of people outside, some of whom then began fighting.

Warrick's friends say they heard at least 20 to 30 shots fired.

Louisville police have not released any information about what may have prompted the shooting. As of Monday, no arrests had been made.

Jacob Ryan, WFPL

A judge has ended a restraining order that barred the city of Louisville from removing a 120-year-old monument to Confederate soldiers that sits near the University of Louisville.

A group of residents and the Sons of Confederate Veterans opposed removing the 1895 stone obelisk monument and won a temporary restraining order a few days after Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced it would be removed on April 29.

Jefferson Circuit Judge Judith McDonald-Burkman on Wednesday presided over several hours of testimony from the monument’s supporters, who argued that the city does not own it and that it could be damaged or crumble if it is removed.

Burkman asked that the city not take any action until she issues a written ruling.

Judge Temporarily Blocks Removal Of Confederate Monument

May 2, 2016
Jacob Ryan, WFPL

A judge has temporarily barred the city of Louisville from removing a 70-foot-tall Confederate monument from the University of Louisville campus.

Jefferson Circuit Judge Judith McDonald-Burkman signed a restraining order Monday morning forbidding the city from moving the 121-year-old obelisk honoring Kentuckians who died fighting for the Confederacy in the Civil War.

Mayor Greg Fischer and University President James Ramsey announced Friday that they would remove the monument, marking the latest government to reconsider its display of Confederate symbols following the massacre of nine black churchgoers in South Carolina last summer.

The Sons of Confederate Veterans and Everett Corley, a Republican running for Congress, filed for the restraining order on Monday. The judge scheduled a hearing for Thursday morning.

Confederate Statue At U of L To Be Removed

Apr 29, 2016
Jacob Ryan, WFPL

Mayor Greg Fischer and University of Louisville President James Ramsey announced Friday the Confederate statue on U of L’s Belknap campus will be removed.

Ramsey, via Twitter, said the monument would be removed immediately. “It is time for U of L to step forward in partnership with the city of Louisville to remove the monument…in respect of all people.”

Ramsey said a campus diversity committee recommended the university remove the statue.

The removal of the Confederate monument will also be the first tangible action for reworking the Third Street corridor near the entrance to the recently opened Speed Art Museum, Ramsey said.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

The dean of the University of Louisville’s School of Public Health & Information Sciences is joining other university deans in urging the federal government to rethink its approach to fighting cancer.

The federal Cancer Moonshot Task Force was launched earlier this year with $1 billion to develop new ways to detect and treat cancer. But in a letter sent earlier this week to task force leader Vice President Joe Biden, U of L Dean Craig Blakely and 71 other deans said they were concerned the approach misses the mark.

“We urge you to pay careful attention to the balance between treatment and prevention-related investments,” the letter said.

Blakely said he supports the federal government investing in cancer research, but the initiative is missing a meaningful contribution to prevention.

WFPL News

Top officials at the University of Louisville are denying a news report that President James Ramsey is considering retiring from the university.

Citing unnamed sources, WHAS-11 anchor Doug Proffitt reported Tuesday night that Ramsey held a private meeting at his home with a small group of trustees last weekend, at which he discussed a “roadmap” to retire. Proffitt’s story came after Kentucky Sports Radio host Matt Jones reported something similar on his radio show.

Kathleen Smith, Ramsey’s chief of staff and perhaps his closest ally at U of L, said in an email to WFPL News on Wednesday morning that Proffitt’s story is “totally false.”

Reached Wednesday afternoon, U of L Foundation board chair Dr. Robert Hughes echoed Smith, saying the report is “absolutely false.”

University of Louisville

Less than a day after a member of the University of Louisville’s investigative committee looking into allegations of prostitution within the men’s basketball program spoke out against the school’s decision to self-impose a postseason ban, the university is attempting to clarify the committee’s role.

It is the first time any U of L official has spoken publicly about details of the committee, despite inquiries from WFPL and other media for more information.

The statement from U of L also comes after men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino last week told a national ESPN radio show that Athletic Director Tom Jurich made the decision to keep the team out of the Atlantic Coast Conference and NCAA tournaments this season. The school had previously said it was U of L President James Ramsey’s call, and reiterated that in a statement today.

U of L Professor Ricky Jones, chair of the Pan-African Studies Department and a member of the investigative committee, told The Courier-Journal on Monday that he disagreed with the decision to self-impose a ban.

“There was nothing we saw that implicated anyone but Andre McGee,” Jones told the C-J.

University of Louisville

Gov. Matt Bevin on Thursday withdrew a motion from former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear that would have dismissed a lawsuit accusing Beshear of breaking state law when he did not appoint a single African-American to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees last year.

Bevin filed pleadings Thursday with the Franklin Circuit Court “expressing his agreement” with the group that filed the lawsuit, according to his office.

Last summer, the West Louisville-based Justice Resource Center asked then-Attorney General Jack Conway to weigh in on whether U of L was out of compliance with the racial minority requirement state law, which requires the board to have a proportional representation of minorities.

Activists said Conway ducked the issue when he released an opinion requiring that Beshear appoint at least one racial minority to the board. The governor appoints 17 of the 20 U of L trustees; by appointing one African-American, Beshear would have brought the total to two.

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News)

Two members of the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees publicly withdrew their support for U of L President James Ramsey during the board’s regular meeting today.

In September, all 20 trustees signed a letter affirming their support for Ramsey as the state auditor’s office began an investigation into the relationship between the school and its $1.1 billion nonprofit foundation. Ramsey is the head of both entities, and he is a voting member of the foundation’s board of directors.

Alluding to the numerous scandals that have emerged at the university over the past few months, trustee Steve Campbell interjected early in the meeting to announce he was withdrawing his support for Ramsey.

“Ever since [September], there have been material issues with the university. I’m not going to list them, you all are aware of them,” said Campbell, an adviser at financial firm Lazard Freres & Co. “And as a result, I feel that the circumstances have changed. I am happy to stand alone, and I do so with all due respect.”

Orchestra Kentucky

Orchestra Kentucky Music Director Jeffrey Reed has been named one of this year’s 12 University of Louisville Alumni Fellows.  

Reed co-founded Orchestra Kentucky in Bowling Green in 2000. He was recognized by the University of Louisville especially for growing audiences by combining classical and popular music unified by a theme.  

“We started with a traditional all classical program and found that although the public supported it, the numbers were very modest," said Reed. "And I kind of morphed into the present approach.”

That present approach has included concerts featuring the music of  Elvis Presley, Kenny Rogers and Paul Williams.

“We’ve presented an Elvis concert. Of course, Elvis used orchestra in his recording, so it was a perfect concert for that," Reed said. "We just had Kenny Rogers here and Paul Williams, the Oscar winning songwriter. We have Michael W. Smith coming, the Christian artist. So we present many headliners with the orchestra, as well.” 

In honor of being chosen a University of Louisville Alumni Fellow, Reed will present a lecture to music students and receive his award at a banquet at the university.

The orchestra’s Oct. 16 concert is a Sci Fi Spectacular, with music from 2001: A Space Odyssey,  Star Wars, E.T. and Star Trek.

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