University of Louisville


A row of towering concrete silos bearing the name and mascot of the University of Louisville is destined for the wrecking ball.

If you’ve ever driven on I-65 into Louisville, you’ve surely seen the row of 11 concrete silos that sit right off the interstate. The silos have been an area landmark for 94 years, but the Courier-Journal reports University of Louisville officials have reached a deal to pay $3.3 million for the property that borders the school’s Belknap Campus.

The silos will be torn down and replaced with classrooms and academic facilities. A master plan developed by U of L calls for the property just north of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium to be used for unspecified academic or research purposes.

The 15-acre parcel of land where the silos sit became available for purchase when the company that owned it shut down an industrial plant in January.

The wealthiest men’s college basketball program resides in the Bluegrass State.

A new ESPN report puts the University of Louisville at the top of the list, with the program bringing in about $35 million in profits during last season’s title run.

The Louisville Cardinals had several things going for them last season that helped them earn the title of “wealthiest program” in the nation. They were at, or near, the top of the national rankings last season as they won the school's third NCAA championship, they had the third-highest attendance of any program in the country, and they benefited from the income generated through 71 luxury box seats at the KFC Yum! Center.

Seating a little over 22,000 fans per home game, the Yum! Center was filled to an average of 97.6% capacity last season during U of L’s home games.

One ESPN analyst wrote in the report that the Cardinals’ financial clout was enough to make “even some NBA executives envious.”

A lawsuit has been filed in the wake of a partnership announced by Kentucky's two children's hospitals.

Kosair Children's Hospital in Louisville and the University of Kentucky HealthCare's Kentucky Children's Hospital in Lexington said last month that both institutions had signed a letter of intent to partner.

The announcement brought a quick reaction from the University of Louisville, which said the partnership could jeopardize U of L's relationship with Norton Healthcare, which owns Kosair. U of L then accused Norton of violating a land-lease agreement by entering into the partnership.

The Courier-Journal reports Norton Healthcare filed suit on Friday and requested the court "to declare (University of Louisville) threats against Kosair Children's Hospital to be without legal basis."

U of L called the filing of the lawsuit "unfortunate."

Norton Healthcare

Officials with Norton Healthcare have rejected the University of Louisville’s request that they end their recently announced pediatric services partnership with UK Healthcare.

University of Louisville’s health care entity  partners with Norton, which owns Kosair Children’s Hospital. The hospital sits on state-owned land and under state rules it  must be used for the benefit of U of L and the citizens of the Commonwealth.

U of L officials say Norton’s partnership with UK violates that agreement, and last week they sent Norton a letter demanding that they end the agreement with UK within 30 days and instead negotiate a new contract with U of L.

This week Norton sent its own letter saying there are no legal grounds for the demands, adding there’s nothing in the agreement with the state that gives U of L a monopoly on Kosair Children’s Hospital.

U of L is threatening legal action once the 30 days are up and has requested that the Attorney General’s office look into the matter.

A family member said the University of Louisville's first African-American football player, Laurence Simmons, was killed over the weekend in a house fire.

Maj. Henry Ott, of Louisville Fire & Rescue, said the 79-year-old Simmons was living in a basement bedroom when a fire started Saturday morning likely due to a frayed extension cord used to power a space heater. No one else was injured.

His brother, Norman Simmons, told The Courier-Journal that Laurence Simmons played offensive lineman for the University of Louisville in 1952 and was a standout football player at Central High School.

Louisville's Charlie Strong Now Among Highest Paid College Coaches

Jan 24, 2013
U of L Athletics

Charlie Strong has officially joined the ranks of the highest-paid college football coaches in the country. The University of Louisville has approved a new contract for Strong. It's an eight-year deal that pays him $3.7 million per season. 

U of L Athletics Director Tom Jurich says Strong is well-deserving.

"I think he's already lived up to it and earned it. In every aspect of his coaching ability, he's got an A-plus from me," Jurich said.

The contract includes a buyout if Strong leaves early for another job. He must pay Louisville $5 million dollars if he leaves after the first year of the contract. Strong is now among the ten highest-paid coaches in college football.

The Atlantic Coast Conference’s presidents and chancellors have voted unanimously to add Louisville as the replacement for Maryland, a person familiar with the situation said Wednesday morning. The person said ACC leaders also considered Connecticut and Cincinnati over the past week before choosing to add the Cardinals from the Big East.

The University of Louisville has received funding for a program that helps students aspiring to be the first in their families to attend college. U of L said Monday it has received two federal grants totaling $3.3 million to continue its Upward Bound program for another five years.

When it comes to preparing for a nationally televised debate, so much preparation goes into brushing up on the issues, but what isn't said can be just as important to a candidate's performance. Body language can make a big impact on how voters view candidates.

A representative of the Lexington-based Family Foundation says he was turned away from a meeting to discuss the fate of the Chick-fil-A restaurant chain on the University of Louisville campus. Policy analyst Andrew Walker says he was told the meeting was private and his presence would not be allowed. The group has criticized recent suggestions that the University of Louisville could expel a business from its campus because a company executive spoke against gay marriage.