ALIVE Center for Community Partnerships

The Western Kentucky University-based ALIVE Center for Community Partnerships is hoping to tap into the volunteer spirit of the school and surrounding communities.

The ALIVE Center connects individuals with organizations seeking to address local, regional, and global needs.

The center is holding an event Thursday, March 31, that will introduce volunteers from WKU and the southern Kentucky region with various non-profit groups from the area.

ALIVE Center Director Leah Ashwill says a major goal of her group is to nurture young people who want to have a positive impact on their community. She says many young people don’t know where to start.

“A lot of times they just don’t know how. They’re not sure exactly how to get connected, and they also get overwhelmed by the realm of possibilities, and the amount of need that exists.”

The Campus Community and Network meeting takes place Thursday from 3:00 to 4:30 pm at the Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce.


Southern Kentucky volunteers over the age of 55 are being sought out to help with a number of service-related organizations in the region.

The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program—or  RSVP—assists efforts such as food pantries, blood drives, and school mentoring campaigns in Allen, Barren, Logan, Simpson, and Warren counties. Kathy Trulock oversees the program, and says another way senior volunteers help is by getting people signed up for health coverage through the state’s benefit exchange, known as kynect.

“A lot of people don’t know they’re eligible for that. So we have that program here at our agency, and we need people to educate folks who qualify, and how they can sign up.”

RSVP volunteer coordinator Holly Vincent says the group has been critical in assisting a Thursday night soup kitchen in Bowling Green that serves 200-300 people a week. She says those involved in the effort often choose to assist agencies that reach out to other senior citizens.

But Vincent adds many older volunteers also want to help younger Kentuckians.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet says "Summer Scrub Week" starts today, and volunteers will be cleaning up roadsides across the state. Its part of a program that started in 1988.

Volunteers at Kentucky schools will probably be forced to pay a ten dollar fee for criminal background checks, if they want to help out in the upcoming school year. The new fee will go into effect on July 1st.