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Several universities are banding together to address Kentucky's physician shortage.

The University of Kentucky College of Medicine will offer satellite programs at Morehead State University and Western Kentucky University, to increase the number of doctors in the state.

UK President Eli Capilouto says those who attend med school close to home are 60 to 70% more likely to practice medicine in those areas.

The partnership, which will also include St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Kings Daughters Medical Center and The Medical Center in Bowling Green, could begin within two years.

Kevin Willis, WKU Public Radio

The amount of snow that’s fallen in southern Kentucky over the past year is enough to make the upper Midwest proud.

Bowling Green has seen 43.5 inches of snow between February 14, 2015, and the same date this year.

Western Kentucky University meteorology professor Greg Goodrich says that’s more than five times the normal amount of snow in Warren County over any 12 month period.

“Normally, in that period, we would expect about eight inches. And in some winters we struggle to get even that. So for us to get this many big snow storms is really amazing, and there’s only a few other times when we’ve experienced anything like this.”

The total snowfall seen in the past 12 months in Bowling Green is all the more impressive when compared to cities normally associated with cold weather.

The nearly four feet of snow seen in Warren County is more than what fell during the same time period in Chicago, Minneapolis, and Salt Lake City.

Here’s a look at the total amount of snowfall in select cities between Feb. 14, 2015 through Feb. 14, 2016, courtesy of Professor Goodrich:

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Western Kentucky University is encouraging American workplaces to nurture and support female leaders.

A one-day conference on Friday, Feb. 19, is called Women Leading and includes talks given by women who have achieved leadership positions in academia and the military.

WKU communications professor Cecile Garmon says conference organizers hope to broaden the definition of the word “leadership”.

“If young women and young men realize that leadership is not masculine or feminine—it’s leadership—then both groups can do it, and they can both learn from each other and support each other,” Garmon told WKU Public Radio.

Garmon says the subject started getting more attention following comments made by Facebook Chief Operating Office Sheryl Sandberg about the low number of women leading Fortune 500 companies.  

The Women Leading conference will feature talks by:

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Efforts to expand Kentucky’s Civil Rights Act are getting a boost from a Western Kentucky University legal scholar.

History Professor and Constitutional law expert Patricia Minter is testifying Wednesday in Frankfort in support of a bill that would offer greater legal protections to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals.

The measure would expand the reach of the Kentucky Civil Rights Act to cover LGBT individuals.

Minter says Kentucky’s LGBT community shouldn’t face discrimination in housing, employment, and public accommodations.

“It won’t be long before Americans all over the country will look back at using sexual orientation or gender identity as discriminatory categories, and wonder what people were thinking,” Minter said.  

The Kentucky House Judiciary committee will hear testimony regarding the bill Wednesday at noon eastern.

Minter acknowledges the bill faces an uphill climb in this year’s legislature. Opponents of protecting LGBT individuals under the state’s Civil Rights Act say such a move would infringe upon the religious beliefs of employers and landlords.

The Senate version of the bill is called the Kentucky Competitive Workforce Act. The measure is backed by nearly 200 employers who have formed the Kentucky Competitive Workforce Coalition. The group argues that protecting LGBT individuals from discrimination would make the Bluegrass Stare more attractive to businesses who favor progressive values, as well as workers who want to live in places seen as welcoming to the LGBT community.

WKU Public Radio

Western Kentucky University students struggling with mental health issues can now tap into an on-campus support group.  

The National Alliance for Mental Illness is starting the free and confidential program which is available to students in all degree programs.

The group’s first meeting is Feb. 1 from 6:00-7:30pm in room 211 of the Academic Complex. Meetings will be held twice a month.

WKU Social Work Professor Jay Gabbard is the faculty member overseeing the group, along with trained NAMI staff.

He wants students to know that having a mental illness doesn’t mean they can’t succeed in school and in the workplace.

“I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder when I was 20, and through management of the illness over the years I’ve managed to have a successful life,” Gabbard said. “But I think it’s best to utilize a three-pronged approach: medication, therapy, and support resources.”

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Governor Matt Bevin wants to influence any performance-based funding model used by Kentucky universities.

The leaders of the state’s public schools and the Council on Postsecondary Education have been working for 18 months on a proposed formula for any new funding they receive.

But not only are universities not in line to receive new funding in the next state budget, they’re facing significant cuts.

Western Kentucky University Vice President of Public Affairs Robbin Taylor says Bevin has indicated he wants any such model to be based largely on how well schools help address workforce development needs.

Taylor says she thinks schools now have to re-evaluate what they’ve been working on.

"I don't want to say this negates all that, but it sort of puts all that on hold. As the Governor has indicated, he didn't think it went far enough, and he'd like to be a part of making those decisions, and has indicated his desire to work with the university presidents and the Council on Postsecondary Education to come up with those measures."

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WKU President Gary Ransdell announced at Friday's Board of Regents meeting in Elizabethtown that he is retiring effective June 30, 2017.

He said he wanted to give the school ample time to find a successor. He will have served as WKU President for 20 years by the time he leaves the post.

Ransdell said picking the right time to step aside has been something he and his wife, Julie, have been discussing for a while.

"We want to do this on our terms, and this has been an incredible 19 years so far, and will be an incredible 20 years," Ransdell told WKU Public radio.  "We just felt like our health is good and I've seen so many people in this job retire and not have the best of circumstances with their health."

In an email to faculty and staff,   Ransdell said he believes he has fulfilled the commitment he made in 1997 to transform the university. 

"WKU is a dramatically different institution today than it was 20 years ago – financially, physically, intellectually and attitudinally.  Serving my alma mater has been a dream come true," said Ransdell.

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In an e-mail to faculty and staff late Wednesday afternoon, WKU President Gary Ransdell said Governor Matt Bevin's proposed budget cuts to higher education present a substantial challenge to the university.

Bevin's proposal calls for a 4.5 percent budget cut this fiscal year. That translates to $3.3 million out of WKU's budget by the end of June. Nine percent reductions would go into effect after that.

"There are many details of this plan that are yet to be understood, and with regard to performance funding, those details have yet to be defined," Ransdell said in his message. "So we are a long way from fully knowing how WKU will be impacted by these proposals.  I am confident, however, that WKU will fare well in any measure that is outcome or performance based.

Ransdell says the budget contains at least one bright spot for WKU. Gov. Bevin's budget proposal contains an equity funding appropriation for both WKU and Northern Kentucky University. Ransdell says the appropriation would held "level the playing field for our students who are paying a disproportionate share of their education in comparison to students at other Kentucky universities."

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Western Kentucky University is filming a video aimed at helping students and employees handle active shooter situations.

The video will include scenes of university police entering a building as if a shooting had taken place inside. Filming will begin Tuesday morning at 9 a.m. at the Mass Media and Technology Hall.

The video is based on a training program created by the city of Houston called, Run, Fight, Hide.

"The basic premise is, in a situation like that, is if you can run and put distance between you and the shooter--safely do so, “said WKU Media Relations Director Bob Skipper. “If you can't, you hide and barricade yourself in. And if all else fails, then you take a stand and try to fight."

Skipper says WKU students and workers have asked for more information on how to handle violent encounters following several high-profile mass shootings in the U.S.

Kevin Willis

A new support center at WKU will provide help to the more than 2,000 students with military backgrounds.

The Military Student Support Center at the WKU-Glasgow campus was officially opened at a ceremony Wednesday. Military Student Services Director Tonya Archey says the center will assist students from all over the world who are enrolled in WKU classes.

“We have Coast Guard students in Florida right now, we have active duty Navy in Hawaii right now, and we have students serving all over the world, in Europe and Asia. It’s hard to get admitted when you’re stationed in Korea, for example. It’s hard to navigate the admissions process from overseas. So they call us and we help them through that process.”

Archey says completing college admissions and financial aid forms can be complicated for any student. But she says it can be especially daunting for military students, who face additional paperwork related to admissions and benefits they are entitled to based on their service.

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WKU President Gary Ransdell informed faculty and staff Tuesday afternoon that Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Gordon Emslie is stepping down from his administrative roles and returning to teaching.

An email sent by President Ransdell said Emslie will take a sabbatical and teach in the WKU Physics and Astronomy department beginning in January.

Dr. David Lee will take over as Provost and VP of Academic Affairs Monday. Lee, currently the Dean of the Potter College of Arts and Letters, will serve a two-year appointment, with a search for a successor beginning next summer.

Dr. Emslie has served five years as Provost and VP of Academic Affairs.

“I support Gordon’s decision and offer my sincere appreciation to him for his loyal and dedicated service,” said WKU President Gary A. Ransdell.  “I have appreciated his sound financial acumen, tenacious support of the faculty and his teamwork with our colleagues on the Administrative Council."

Flickr/Creative Commons/Jason Howie

Researchers from WKU and Clemson University have teamed up to learn more about the role social media sites play in spreading inaccurate information during crisis situations.

WKU associate professor of communications Blair Thompson recently co-authored a study that was published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior. The study examined the impact social media had on disseminating information following a pair of school shootings that took place at Fern Creek High School in Louisville and Albermarle, North Carolina, on Sept. 30, 2014.

Thompson recently spoke to WKU Public Radio about the research findings. Here are some excerpts from our conversation:

What were you hoping to learn when you set out on this research project?

We knew there would be misinformation—that’s what happens when people go into that (a school shooting) so fast, and they’re posting  whatever, and they pull off what somebody else says, and it just kind of builds from there.

I think what’s useful about the research is that we were able to pinpoint the specific areas where the misinformation occurs. We found five or six categories.

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WKU has picked its next Vice President of Development and Alumni Relations.

Marc Archambault will join WKU August 17, and take over the post previously held by Kathryn Costello, who is transitioning into a different position at the school.

Archambault currently serves as head of development and alumni at Utah Valley University, and has previously held positions at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California; Purdue University; and the University of Houston.

Speaking to WKU Public Radio Monday, Archambault  said he’ll be working this summer to meet as many WKU stakeholders as possible.

“One of the first important steps is a listening tour, and collecting as much data as I can while I try to master the financial and budgetary landscape in which I’ll be working.”

Archambault  will also serve as President of the WKU Foundation, and will lead the school’s next capital campaign.

“It is early, of course, and I think at this stage we would really describe it as exploring a future campaign. It’s something President Ransdell and the leadership feel passionate about.”

Archambault holds a bachelor’s degree in physical sciences and English from Saint Michael’s College in Colchester, Vermont, and a Certificate in Fundraising Management from the Center of Philanthropy at Indiana University in Indianapolis.

WKU

A Lexington brewing and distilling company is setting up a beer production line in Bowling Green.

Alltech, which produces Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale, delivered a production-level brewing system Wednesday to WKU’s Center for Research and Development. No date has been set as to when the production line will begin operating, though it could start sometime this fall.

When complete, the brewing system would be the largest to be located at a university.

Alltech is leasing the space from WKU and will begin a craft beer brewing operation, while also paying the renovation and installation costs.

Meanwhile, some WKU administrators have been working on a proposal for a major and minor in brewing and distillation. Potter College of Arts & Letters Assistant Dean Andrew McMichael says the university has been seeking input from industry leaders.

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A recent WKU graduate from Lexington has won the 2015 Hearst National Multimedia championship.

Adam Wolfbrandt received his photojournalism degree last month, and is the first WKU student to win the Hearst Multimedia title, along with a $5,000 award.

The Hearst awards are considered the “Pulitzers of college journalism”, and are given annually to students for excellence in the fields of photojournalism, writing, radio, television, and multimedia.

WKU students have won the Hearst photojournalism title 11 times, and the Hearst national writing championship and radio news championship one time each.

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