WKU

Education
2:06 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

WKU One of Nine Schools Receiving Grant Money to Boost Minority Students in STEM Fields

WKU hopes to attract more minority students into degrees related to the STEM fields.
Credit WKU

WKU is part of a collaborative effort to increase the number of minority students pursuing degrees in the so-called “STEM” fields.

WKU and eight other higher education institutions in the commonwealth and West Virginia have been awarded a five-year, $ 2.5 million National Science Foundation grant that will primarily focus on undergraduates seeking diplomas in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

WKU’s Associate Vice President for Retention and Student Services, Joelle Davis Carter, says she hopes some of the school’s grant money will be used to create a “summer bridge” program.

“This would be an opportunity for prospective college students to come to campus a little earlier, maybe five weeks earlier, stay on campus, and participate in reiterations of math and science,” she told WKU Public Radio.

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Arts & Culture
3:48 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

2014 SOKY Book Festival to Feature Nearly 150 Authors

The 2014 SOKY Book Fest is Saturday, April 26.
Credit Southern Kentucky Book Fest

An organizer of an upcoming book festival in Bowling Green says it’s becoming more of a challenge to get authors at larger publishers to appear at events for free.

Kristie Lowry is literary outreach coordinator with WKU Libraries, and an organizer with the Southern Kentucky Book Festival. She says book companies have cut their budgets related to book tours and marketing campaigns.

“So getting the authors to come to an event like ours for free, which would have been a little easier back in the day, is harder to do now,” Lowry told WKU Public Radio. “And Penguin and Random House have their own speaker bureaus now, so they market their authors, but you have to pay a fee in order to have them come into town.”

Lowry says another growing trend in the literary world is the rising number of self-published authors. She says many self-published writers in the southern Kentucky region, like Allison Jewell and Jennie Brown, have loyal followings and are well-received when they appear on panels at local book festivals.

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Environment
3:40 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

WKU Celebrates Earth Day with Help of Bus Serving as Mobile Produce Market

Maggie Jolly, 9 (left) and Eliza Beth, 7, and Carter Howell, 10, play in the mobile farmers market on WKU's campus on Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Abbey Oldham

Bowling Green’s new mobile farmer’s market is offering fresh food on wheels to areas of the city where fresh produce may be hard to find. 

The market was introduced to the public at an Earth Day event at WKU. 

When Jackson Rolett started up the old, retro-fitted school bus Tuesday, it was a proud moment.  He’s been working since last spring on a traveling farmer’s market that will deliver fresh, locally grown produce to under-served areas of the city. 

"We're seeking to address accessibility," said Rolett.  "Transportation is a big issue with food access, especially in certain areas of Bowling Green, so we thought 'Why not bring the food to those people?'"

Funded with a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the market also accepts forms of government assistance. 

Kentucky’s Agriculture Commissioner James Comer has praised the effort and hopes similar markets can launch statewide. 

Bowling Green’s mobile market will travel Wednesday to the Barren River District Health Department and the Boys and Girls Club.

Education
2:44 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

WKU's Ransdell: U.S. Schools Need to Grow International Student Populations--While They Still Can

WKU President Gary Ransdell
Credit WKU

WKU President Gary Ransdell is confident the school will be able to grow its international student body over the next several decades.

But he admits it will become more difficult to do so as countries such as China and India become wealthier and begin to build more of their own universities.

“There are not enough colleges and universities to meet the needs in an awful lot of the countries that have growing economies and growing populations. Therefore, we’re a solution," the WKU President said. "Now, in another generation—in another 25 or 30 years—they may have built enough universities to meet their needs.”

Dr. Ransdell says WKU is actively recruiting in several countries where the school has previously not had a presence.

“South America is really an emerging market for higher education," Ransdell said during a break in Friday's Board of Regents meeting. "We’re looking at as many as 90 students from Brazil next year. We’re always looking for new markets. Turkey is an emerging market for us. Their economy is doing great, and their families are looking for a place to send their sons and daughters.”

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Education
12:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

WKU Actively Recruiting Mid-Continent Students Following Announcement that School is Closing

Mid-Continent University will officially close June 30.
Credit Mid-Continent University

WKU is working to recruit students from a school in far western Kentucky that is closing at the end of June.  

Mid-Continent University in Mayfield announced this week that it will shutter due to financial struggles. All employees have been laid off, though many faculty members have volunteered to continue helping students who are set to graduate this semester.

WKU Provost Gordon Emslie says the school has been working since the announcement to reach out to Mid-Continent students.

“We’re offering students the ability to transfer here, we’ll waive the application fee, we’ll match their courses in their catalogue to our courses in our catalogue, to try to facilitate that transfer as much as possible," Emslie told WKU Public Radio Friday. "We’ll work with them on tuition and scholarships, and financial aid. And we’re going to go out to Mayfield someday next week.”

Emslie said a website has also been set up to help Mid-Continent students learn more about transferring to WKU.

Mid-Continent is a non-profit university with about two-thousand students. Most are non-traditional and take online courses.

The Office of the Kentucky Attorney General has also set up a website dedicated to helping Mid-Continent students. In addition, the AG’s office sent letters to Mid-Continent administrators reminding them of their obligation to maintain all records as the school prepares to close.

Regional
3:04 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Bowling Green Runner Expects 'Immensely Emotional' Return to Boston

WKU instructor Cort Basham returns to Boston this month for another Boston Marathon
Abbey Oldham/WKU Public Radio

A year ago Tuesday, Cort Basham had just finished his third Boston Marathon and was looking for a place to eat with his mother, who was also on the trip, when he heard an explosion.

“My mind immediately went to the worst, but even someone standing next to us said ‘that sounds like dynamite on a job site’.  But it was within seconds that the second one happened,” Basham told WKU Public Radio’s Kevin Willis just days after last year’s race. 

“Just seconds later, people start pouring around the corner from Boylston – again we were one block from Boylston. Then you knew, even though we didn’t have line-of-sight, that something terrible was happening and we just tried to move away as quickly as we could,” said Basham.

Three spectators died as a result of the bombings; hundreds were injured.

Basham and his mother were uninjured.  As he prepares to return to Boston, we caught up with Basham, a WKU instructor,  to ask him about his training for this year’s race and inquire about what he expects the atmosphere to be like for the marathon.

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Photo Gallery
1:36 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Photo Gallery: Sexual Assault Awareness Month at WKU

WKU freshman Iesha Sanchez marches with her friends from Gilbert Hall during Take Back the Night in downtown Bowling Green on Thursday, March 27, 2014.

The WKU Counseling and Testing Center hosted several events in March for Sexual Assault Awareness month.

Although some events were canceled or cut short due to inclement weather, supporters still came out for events like Walk a Mile in Her Shoes, The Vagina Monologues, and Take Back the Night. On March 18, dozens of collegiate and faculty men donned high heels as they took a mile-long stroll around the WKU campus to bring awareness to sexual assault. On March 27, hundreds of supporters from WKU and the Bowling Green community gathered at the Warren County Justice Center to sing and chant and march around downtown to promote safety on the streets of Bowling Green for women, and everyone, especially at night.

Photojournalist Abbey Oldham documented some of the events, and you see those images in the photo slideshow above.

Regional
12:24 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Power Restored to WKU Fine Arts Center

Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center
Credit WKU

Crews have restored power to the Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center at WKU and the building will re-open at 1 p.m. Monday.  The university says classes will resume Tuesday morning at 8 a.m.

The building lost power Wednesday night, leading to the cancelation of classes Thursday, Friday and Monday.

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Education
3:38 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center at WKU Closed Through Tuesday

Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center
Credit WKU

Update at 3:38 p.m.:

The Ivan Wilson Fine Arts Center at WKU will be closed through Tuesday because of an electrical failure. All classes held at FAC are cancelled, and all offices will be closed.

The electrical failure took place late Wednesday night, leading to the building’s closure Thursday.

The university sent faculty and staff an email Thursday afternoon saying that the building would remain closed until Wednesday, April 2.

Original post:

Following an electrical system failure late Wednesday evening, all day and evening classes at WKU's Fine Arts Center have been canceled Thursday.

Departmental offices housed in the building are closed as well.

The FAC was the only building impacted by the electrical outage. Workers are on campus trying to fix the problem.

Check back later for any new announcements regarding those efforts.

Education
11:41 am
Tue March 25, 2014

As Negotiations Enter Crucial Phase, Budget Funding for Higher Ed, University Projects Unclear

The Gatton Academy for Math and Science is housed at WKU.
Credit WKU

The budget passed by the Kentucky Senate this week has mixed news for WKU. Money for a capital project at the school was removed while other WKU-related funds were left intact.

The Senate’s budget deleted funding for most university capital projects, including bonds to fund a renovation of the Thompson Complex Center Wing, home to numerous WKU science classes.

However, the Senate budget does include funding for the Gatton Academy for Math and Science to support 80 additional students beginning in 2015.

The budget passed by the House includes bond funding for the Thompson Complex project and money to expand the Gatton Academy. But it also contains a 2.5 percent cut to higher education funding.

The Senate spending plan restored that higher education funding cut at the expense of most university capital projects.

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