Ryland Barton

This week in Kentucky politics, Kentucky State Troopers shut protesters out of the state Capitol, allowing only two people to enter the building at a time. Attorney General Andy Beshear is suing Walgreens, saying the company helped fuel the opioid epidemic in the state. And a high-powered lobbyist was in federal court as prosecutors try to prove he bribed a former state official to help a client get state contracts.


Warren County Regional Jail

The neighbor who admitted to attacking U.S. Senator Rand Paul outside his home last fall was sentenced Friday in U.S. District Court in Bowling Green to 30 days in jail. 

Rene Boucher was also ordered to serve one year of supervised release, perform 100 hours of community service, and have no intentional contact with the Paul family. 

Boucher addressed the court and offered an apology to the Republican lawmaker who sustained broken ribs and other injuries after being tackled from behind while mowing his lawn on November 3.

"What I did was wrong and I hope he and his family can one day accept my apology," Boucher said.

Thinkstock

The Kentucky Supreme Court has ruled that part of Kentucky’s death law in unconstitutional.

The decision stems from a case involving a man convicted of murdering a Muhlenberg County teenager 20 years ago.

Robert Keith Woodall was sentenced to death after pleading guilty to viciously attacking 16-year-old Sarah Hansen, raping her, and then dumping her body in a freezing lake where she drowned.

Updated at 12:31 p.m. ET

A federal judge ordered Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, to jail on Friday following allegations by prosecutors that he tampered with witnesses in his case.

"You've abused the trust placed in you six months ago," said Judge Amy Berman Jackson. "I thought about this long and hard, Mr. Manafort. I have no appetite for this."

But Berman Jackson said she could not turn a blind eye to the charges that Manafort had attempted to contact witnesses in his case after he was on bail.

Rhonda J. Miller

A $1 million grant awarded to the Kentucky Labor Cabinet is aimed at increasing the amount of registered apprenticeships throughout the state.

The purpose of this new funding is to help the state establish relationships with third-party organizations and connect apprentices with employers. The grant will also allow the Labor Cabinet to compensate businesses for expenses related to the required training and diversify the pool of apprentices in Kentucky.

Stephen George

Catherine Milliner’s grandson Tony died when he was four years old. Her daughter’s boyfriend was charged with murdering the toddler. And as a three-year trial unfolded, Milliner wanted to keep tabs on every step of the case, including the whereabouts of the accused.

“I got online and found out where Johnny was, the gentleman who murdered my grandson, just by accident,” Milliner said.

Milliner said VINE, Kentucky’s court notification system, failed to notify her of key changes in the case, like the defendant’s transfers between prisons.


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On Friday, a U.S. District Judge in Washington will hear arguments in the case against Kentucky’s sweeping Medicaid changes.

A group of 16 Kentucky residents filed suit in January, arguing Gov. Matt Bevin’s changes to the program are illegal. The approved changes, set to take effect July 1, will make many Medicaid enrollees work, volunteer or do other activities for 80 hours a month in order to keep health coverage. Other changes include limiting access to dental and vision services for some, making other enrollees pay premiums and installing lock-out periods for not making those payments.

Ryland Barton

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear is suing Walgreens, saying the company helped fuel the opioid epidemic by failing to monitor large shipments of pain pills throughout the state.

Beshear said Walgreens failed to report “suspiciously large orders” it received for prescription pain pills.

“Walgreens is in a position to not only know how many pills are coming into Kentucky overall, but also how many pills are coming out of that one retail store in a county with a population that should never support that amount,” Beshear said during a news conference on Thursday.

Nicole Erwin

The U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee has passed it’s version of the Farm Bill with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s provisions to remove hemp from a list of Schedule 1 controlled substances.

McConnell’s Hemp Farming Act of 2018 legalizes the growing of hemp and also allows hemp cultivators to receive federal crop insurance. Lawmakers made amendments during Wednesday's Agriculture Committee meeting and passed the revised version of the bill with only one dissenting vote from  Republican Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa.

paringaresources.com

The CEO of a company behind a new coal mine project in McLean County, Kentucky has resigned. The announcement from the Australian mining company Paringa Resources said managing director and CEO Grant Quasha is resigning as of June 18 to “pursue another opportunity.”

Quasha said in a Fox Business TV interview in September 2017 that the election of President Donald Trump has “ended the war on coal” and allowed Paringa to raise 40 million U.S. dollars in financing in the Australian equity markets, in addition to $20 million in project financing from Macquarie Bank in Australia for construction of the McLean County mine that will produce thermal coal for regional utilities. The mine is in what’s called “the Illinois Basin.” 


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Photo Gallery: Lost River Sessions Arts & Music Festival

It was a hot afternoon May 12 at the first Lost River Sessions Arts & Music Festival. But that didn't stop hundreds from attending the outdoor festival at Fountain Square Park. Later that evening, Willie Watson, Joan Shelley and the Dead Broke Barons put on a fabulous show inside the Capitol Arts Center.

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Exploring the changing economy of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia

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