Politics
2:10 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Guthrie Reelection Campaign Reports Second Quarter Numbers

Rep. Brett Guthrie, right, spoke to a Bowling Green businessman following an event in Warren County.
Credit Kevin Willis

The reelection campaign of Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie reports having over $1.5 million in cash-on-hand.

The Warren County Republican is running for a fourth term in the U.S. House, and is being challenged this fall by Democrat Ron Leach of Meade County. In reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Thursday, Guthrie’s campaign said it raised over $321,000 during the second quarter.

Guthrie’s re-election committee says it has donated about 20-percent of the money raised this election cycle with groups such as the state Republican Party and the National Republican Congressional Committee.

Read more
Regional
11:44 am
Thu July 10, 2014

State Restricts Medical License of Hart County Physician

A Cave City physician’s medical license has been restricted following an investigation into his prescribing practices. 

The investigation into Dr. Chandra Reddy began when the local drug task force received a tip that he was prescribing prescription drugs without having patients visit his office.  The Glasgow Daily Times reports investigators also found evidence the doctor was trading prescriptions for cash and marijuana and that he was using marijuana himself. 

Reddy, who specializes in internal medicine, is no longer allowed to prescribe controlled substances until he meets a number of requirements set by the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure. 

The board previously sanctioned Reddy in 2010 following an investigation that he had inappropriate contact with two female patients during exams.

Education
11:11 am
Thu July 10, 2014

53 Kentucky School Districts Receive Grants to Raise Dropout Age

For some Kentucky school districts, the check is in the mail.  The state Department of Education is sending out this week $10,000 grants to 53 school systems that have raised the high school dropout age. 

The grant money will go toward programs to prevent students from leaving high school without a diploma and to enact the new policy for the 2015-16 school year, which is the first year the policy can be fully implemented.  The department made similar grants last year to the first group of districts to raise the dropout age. 

At the urging of Governor Beshear, the 2013 General Assembly passed a bill raising the compulsory school age from 16 to 18.  Under the measure, once 55 percent of the 173 school districts in the state, approved the change, the rest would have to follow suit.   The requirement was met just two weeks after the law took effect.

Read more
Health
9:48 am
Thu July 10, 2014

WKU Regents Vote to Privatize Health Services Clinic, with Graves Gilbert Taking Control Aug. 1

Graves Gilbert will begin operating the WKU Health Services clinic on Aug. 1.
Credit WKU

The WKU Board of Regents has voted to privatize the campus Health Services center. Graves Gilbert Clinic will take over operations ahead of the fall semester.

The idea of giving up control of the health center was first announced by WKU President Gary Ransdell in March. Privatizing the health center that serves students, faculty, and staff gave the school nearly $1.1 million in relief for the budget that went into effect July 1.

None of the three doctors or one nurse practitioner currently employed by the school will be kept on after the health center changes management.

WKU Vice President for Finance and Administration said at Thursday morning's regents meeting that Graves Gilbert will make decisions on whether or not to retain the center's remaining employees within 10 days of the contract being finalized.

Mead added both parties have a lot to do in a short amount of time.

“We’ll be moving into helping Graves Gilbert transition to opening on Aug. 1. We want to facilitate Graves Gilbert’s family practitioners to be able to meet our leadership on campus, and start having the campus understand what services are going to be provided at our on-campus facility.”

Read more
Regional
5:17 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Bowling Green UAW Leader Fired by GM

Long-time United Auto Workers Union President Eldon Renaud is out at the Bowling Green General Motors Plant. 

Spokeswoman Andrea Hales confirmed that Renaud is no longer employed at the plant.  Renaud had no comment when contacted Thursday morning by WKU Public Radio.  He served as the local UAW president since 1982 and had been a GM employee for more than 40 years. 

Renaud had been critical of Plant Manager Dave Tatman, who resigned abruptly in February.   In April, the union voted to authorize a strike if the plant didn’t resolve some safety and quality issues.  A strike never occurred.

Renaud also served as Bowling Mayor from 1996 to 2000. 

Summer Camp
4:00 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Photo Gallery: Aviation Camp in Bowling Green

Hannah Ward (left), 13 of Smiths Grove, and Megan Jones, 11 of Bowling Green, observe Kurt Jefferson, aeronautics instructor from Lexingon, during Aviation Camp at the Bowling Green Regional Airport on Tuesday, July 8, 2014.
Abbey Oldham

Dozens of kids from around the region are participating in Aviation Camp at the Bowling Green Regional Airport.

The instructors from the Aviation Museum of Kentucky travel to airports around the state during the summer exposing young Kentuckians to aviation. The campers are learning the basics of aeronautics, navigation, using flight simulators, and even flying airplanes with assistance from instructors.

Photojournalist Abbey Oldham photographed Aviation Camp on Tuesday, July 8, 2014. There are two Bowling Green camps, July 8-9 and 10-11.

Immigration Debate
4:46 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

In Bowling Green, Coalition of Eclectic Groups Speaks Out for Immigration Reform

Albert Mbanfu, Executive Director, Bowling Green International Center; Dalton Workman, Chairman, WKU College Republican; and H.H. Barlow, Owner, Barlu Farms, Presidential Appointee to US Board for International Food & Agriculture Development speak in favor of national immigration reform during the press conference at the International Center in Bowling Green, Ky.
Credit Abbey Oldham

A coalition of business, political, and refugee-rights groups in south-central Kentucky is calling on Congress to pass immigration reform.  

As part of a so-called national “Day of Action”, representatives from various backgrounds spoke Wednesday in Bowling Green about the need for Congressional  leaders and the Obama Administration to get reform passed this year.

Barren County dairy farmer H.H. Barlow, a presidential appointee to the U.S. Board for International Food and Agriculture Development, said many Americans don’t understand the impact immigrant labor has on sectors such as the agriculture industry.

“I hate the word ‘criminals’, or ‘illegal aliens’—I don’t like that term. They’re workers. They’re performing an essential service to our country,” Barlow said.

The Barren County farmer said he speaks to his elected representatives about the need for immigration reform each time he sees them. Barlow believes that reform will not only benefit immigrants, but also the U.S. economy.

Read more
Music
4:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Clash In Nashville: A Property Battle On Music Row Draws A Crowd

Inside RCA Studio A, whose sale has sparked a wave of backlash from the Nashville music community, Ben Folds (right, on staircase) addresses press and supporters.
Stephen Jerkins

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:27 am

News that a Nashville developer is paying $4.4 million for a half-century-old recording studio has sparked a battle in Music City. On one side is singer-songwriter Ben Folds, inspired by the musical history made in that studio. On the other, a trailblazing musician who made that history.

Read more
Regional
3:05 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Indiana Agencies Told to Ignore Gay Marriages

Indiana Governor Mike Pence's office is telling state agencies to act as if no gay marriages had been performed during three days following a federal court order.

The memo from the governor's chief counsel tells executive branch agencies to execute their functions as though the June 25 court order had not been issued.

A federal judge in Indianapolis struck down the state's gay marriage ban as unconstitutional that day, leading to hundreds of same-sex marriages around the state. But an appeals court stayed that ruling three days later after an appeal from the state attorney general's office.

The governor's office told agencies to recognize the out-of-state marriage of Amy Sandler and Nikole Quasney of Munster, in line with the appellate court order. Quasney is dying of ovarian cancer.

Health
2:57 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Report: Kentucky Ranks 10th Lowest for Uninsured

A new report finds  that Kentucky’s implementation of the Affordable Care Act has dramatically reduced the number of uninsured people in the state.

The report, released Wednesday by the personal finance website WalletHub, finds that Kentucky now ranks 10th in the nation for the lowest number of uninsured individuals, at just under nine percent of the population. That number was over 17 percent before the ACA became law, reflecting an 8 percent drop in the rate in one year’s time.

It also found that about 30 percent of Kentuckians under 65 are enrolled in Medicaid.

Nearly 83,000 Kentuckians have enrolled in new private health insurance plans, and 265,000 have enrolled in  Medicaid as of April 2014.

Pages