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Abbey Oldham/WKU Public Radio

Franklin County authorities had hoped to announce a resolution in the Pappy Van Winkle theft case on Tuesday but it's still not closed.  
 
Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton says he is going to delay any announcements until next week, because of new developments that came to light, and continues working that and the Wild Turkey case, where five barrels of Wild Turkey were found at the home of 45-year old Gilbert Curtsinger.  
 
65-cases of Pappy Van Winkle were stolen from Buffalo Trace distillery two years ago. Melton won't say if the two thefts are related.  

 Sheriff Melton says the case involves significantly more stolen bourbon than previously thought and will eventually result in multiple indictments. He says investigators uncovered a new "major development" yesterday that will delay presenting the case to the grand jury in Frankfort.

Kentucky Utility Settles Overbilling Case with Prosecutors

Apr 13, 2015

A Kentucky utility accused of over billing Fort Knox for energy-savings initiatives has agreed to pay the government $7.6 million to settle the case. 

Acting U.S. Attorney John E. Kuhn Jr. announced the agreement Monday with Elizabethtown-based Nolin Rural Electric Cooperative. 

Prosecutors say Nolin received more than $8 million in payments for energy-saving projects that never should have been authorized. The projects were touted as cost savings but were actually projected to lose more than $15 million in 10 years. 

Nolin was also accused of billing Fort Knox for projects never approved. 

Nolin President and CEO Mickey Miller says no one at the utility profited from work at Fort Knox. 

Former military contractor Gary T. Meredith is accused of orchestrating the cooperative's overbilling. Meredith is set to stand trial in December.

U.S. Postal Service

The April 15 tax deadline is two days away.  For the roughly ten percent of Americans who still mail their returns, the postal service has a few reminders. 

Filers can no longer wait until the last minute to get to the post office.

"Because more people are filing online, post offices aren't open until midnight like they used to be," says David Walton, a spokesman for the USPS Kentuckiana District.  "Most post offices are open during their regular hours, so that's one things customers want to keep in mind."

If depositing returns in a blue collection box, tax filers should double-check the pick-up schedule on the label.  To ensure getting the April 15 postmark, deposit returns before the last scheduled pick-up time. 

Also, make sure to have sufficient postage and include a return address on the envelope.

According to the IRS website, penalties may apply to those who don’t file or pay all the taxes they owe by Wednesday’s deadline.

An Eastern Kentucky nurse is suing the state for not allowing her to take addiction medicine like Suboxone or Vivitrol while she’s out of jail on bond.

The terms set by Floyd County District Court, where Stephanie Watson’s court case is still pending, prevent her from using medically-assisted drug treatment.

Most courts in Kentucky don’t allow those who are on probation, in jail or out on bond to use drugs that treat addiction because some, like Suboxone, are addictive.

Stephanie Watson was arrested for breaking into a Prestonsburg biohazard waste container to retrieve remnants from disposed drug vials.

Watson’s lawyer, Ned Pillersdorf, has filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Eastern Kentucky. He says that judges who refuse to allow addicts to use Suboxone and Methadone are part of a system that violates the Americans With Disabilities act.

“They don’t need to have judges or drug courts looking over their shoulder and saying we will approve or won’t approve that particular prescription,” Pillsersdorf said. “Our position is that opiate addicts should have the right to receive lawful prescriptions from doctors who are able to prescribe without interference from the court system.”

A Daviess County roadway is being renamed in honor of the county’s first Vietnam War casualty.

The state is designating ten miles of Kentucky 144 as the SP5 Charles Francis Millay Memorial Highway.

The Messenger-Inquirer reports a ceremony will be held Saturday morning at St. William Catholic Church in Millay’s hometown of Knottsville.

Millay was 23 and on his second tour of Vietnam when the helicopter he was in was shot down over the southern providence of Binh Dinh in 1965. He died along with eight others aboard the helicopter.

Millay served as a crew chief and door gunner with the 145th Airlift Platoon.

A motorcycle escort will ride through St. William Cemetery, where Millay is buried, to pay tribute to him. A 21-gun military salute and the playing of taps will conclude the ceremony.

Republican Senator Rand Paul is now the first presidential candidate to accept contributions in the form of Bitcoin. The digital currency is new territory for campaign finance law.

Richard Hasen is a law and political science professor at the University of California-Irvine.
He says he doesn’t think Bitcoin will provide a significant source of funding for Paul’s campaign, but he’s not surprised the Republican candidate has chosen to accept Bitcoin. "I think it’s more of a novelty and it certainly fits in with Senator Paul’s image to try to be tech-savvy and there is a kind of a libertarian edge to Bitcoin. So, I think it is quite a natural fit for him to be the one to do it." he said.

But, there are some issues. Bitcoin makes it easier to contribute to a political campaign anonymously and
Hasen says Paul’s campaign will have to rely on donors to provide information, since Bitcoin is an untraceable and unregulated currency.

Hasen says Paul’s campaign is also going to have to make sure contributions aren’t from foreign countries.
The Paul campaign is only accepting up to 100 dollars in Bitcoin contributions per individual.

Louisville’s Morris Forman treatment plant is still not fully functional after an electrical fire and power outage Wednesday night.

More than 100-million gallons of diluted sewage went into the Ohio River yesterday, and more continues to flow today. Some of that sewage was partially-treated, after Morris Forman began resuming some operations.

Some of it wasn’t treated at all, as the outage at the plant and rain caused the city’s combined sewer system to overflow into the river.

As of Friday morning, the sewage was still being discharged into the river, including at the Morris Forman site in Louisville’s Rubbertown neighborhood and at overflow sites around the city.

Metropolitan Sewer District officials are investigating the cause of the fire, but they say preliminary evidence suggests a lightning strike could be responsible.

It will be several days before the treatment plant is fully operational, but MSD spokesman Steve Tedder said the sewer overflows should stop sometime today, if there’s no more rain.

People are advised to avoid contact with the Ohio River and its tributaries.

Indiana health officials say more than 100 people have tested positive for HIV in an outbreak of the virus among intravenous drug users in southeastern Indiana.

The state’s Joint Information Center said Friday that as of Thursday there had been 95 confirmed HIV cases and 11 preliminary positive cases tied to the outbreak.

All of the HIV cases have been linked to needle-sharing among intravenous drug users.

Scott County — about 30 miles north of Louisville, Kentucky — is the epicenter of Indiana’s largest-ever HIV outbreak.

Gov. Mike Pence declared a public health emergency in the county on March 26 that allowed the creation of a limited needle-exchange program that aims to stem the spread of the virus.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Vex Robotics

The Hardin County School System is preparing to host a group of international robotics teams ahead of a major competition next week in Louisville.

The VEX Robotics World Championships are being held Wednesday through Saturday at the Kentucky Expo Center and Freedom Hall. The competition features teams from elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as colleges from all across the world.

Some Central Hardin High School robotics team members will get some special practice before they head to Louisville for the championships.

Jason Neagle, with the Hardin County Schools Early College and Career Center, says fifteen teams from China and Singapore will spend Monday and Tuesday in Elizabethtown, where they will practice their robotics and engineering programs.

“Our students are going to get the opportunity to work alongside with them. The Chinese teams are some of the top-ranked teams in the world, and we have some Top-30 ranked teams as well.”

Kentucky LRC

The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting and The Courier-Journal have filed a motion to intervene in an ongoing sexual harassment lawsuit filed against the Legislative Research Commission by two former staffers of the agency.

The media organizations are trying to bring to light depositions of former Legislative Research Commission director Bobby Sherman and state Rep. Sannie Overly, a Paris Democrat.

Overly is scheduled to be deposed on Monday and Sherman was deposed on Wednesday. They have tried to keep the depositions sealed, citing privacy concerns.

Sherman announced his resignation from the LRC in September 2013, following the conclusion of an internal probe into allegations that former state Rep. John Arnold, a Democrat from Sturgis, sexually harassed statehouse employees.

According to documents filed in the lawsuit in Franklin Circuit Court, Arnold also inappropriately touched Overly, who is currently running for lieutenant governor on the ticket headed by current state Attorney General Jack Conway.

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