Media
7:00 am
Sat November 19, 2011

How Networks Are Filling Airtime Without The NBA

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 3:37 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

With the current NBA lockout, TV networks like ESPN and TNT have had to figure out how to fill the holes left by cancelled games.

And they may lose advertising revenue, as NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports.

ELIZABETH BLAIR, BYLINE: ESPN was ready. They say they put a contingency plan in place over a year ago.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTBALL GAME)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: But Texas A&M has so many points is their ability to run the football.

Read more

As part of NPR's national security team, Dina Temple-Raston reports about counterterrorism at home and abroad for NPR News. Her reporting can be heard on NPR's newsmagazines. She joined NPR in March 2007.

Recently, she was chosen for a Neiman Fellowship at Harvard. These fellowships are given to mid-career journalists. While pursuing the fellowship during the 2013-2014 academic year, Temple-Raston will be temporarily off the air.

Opinion
6:27 am
Sat November 19, 2011

Inside Guantanamo, Detainees Live In Limbo

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 3:37 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Newt Gingrich
4:55 am
Sat November 19, 2011

5 Things You May Not Know About Gingrich

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich, the former House speaker, speaks to supporters during a rally in Jacksonville, Fla., on Thursday.
Stephen Morton AP

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 10:38 am

In the crowded race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, Mitt Romney may be the tortoise, but Newt Gingrich is the newt. And newts are highly adaptive salamanders that regenerate limbs when wounded and emit poison when challenged.

Conventional — and up-to-the-minute contemporary — wisdom pegs Gingrich as the ascendant favorite, knocking other candidates off their posts and platforms like an Angry Bird.

Read more

Rachel Martin is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

Politics
4:00 am
Sat November 19, 2011

With Defense Budget Cuts Come Challenging Costs

The congressional supercommittee has only a few days left to come up with a plan to cut $1.2 trillion from the federal deficit. One of the areas on the chopping block is the nation's defense budget, and Pentagon officials are pushing back against any cuts beyond the $450 billion they've already been asked to make.

The defense budget is an easy target when it comes to cutting the deficit, because it makes up half of the federal government's entire discretionary budget, says Todd Harrison, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

Read more
Politics
11:40 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Foreign Policy Funding A Top Candidate For Cuts

Workers take a break in front of the cooling towers of a coal-fired power plant in Dadong, Shanxi province, China. At a House hearing on Tuesday, Nisha Biswal defended USAID's programs in China, saying the money goes to efforts that include reducing harmful emissions from the country's power plants.
Andy Wong AP

Should the United States give aid to China? Given America's trade imbalance with China, few politicians think it's a good idea.

That's why a hearing over $4 million that the U.S. Agency for International Development intends to spend on environmental programs in China drew such heat on Capitol Hill this week.

A bipartisan group of lawmakers lined up at a House hearing on Tuesday to denounce the program as "an insult to the American taxpayer" that would pour "U.S. taxpayer dollars down the toilet."

Read more
The Two-Way
5:43 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Cool Photo: Scientists Present 'Lightest Material On Earth'

Researchers created a "micro-lattice" structure of interconnected hollow tubes with a wall thickness of 100 nanometers, 1,000 times thinner than a human hair.
Dan Little HRL Laboratories

We were stunned when we saw this image:

According to HRL Laboratories that is an "ultralight metallic microlattice" sitting atop a dandelion. The material was developed by scientists at HRL, The California Institute of Technology and the University of California, Irvine.

The material is 99.99 percent air and 100 times lighter than styrofoam.

Read more
Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems
4:58 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

India Eye Care Center Finds Middle Way To Capitalism

Patients sit after their cataract surgeries at a hospital of the Aravind Eye Care System in Madurai, India.
Reinhard Krause Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 6:38 pm

At an Aravind hospital in Madurai, a city on India's southern tip, the waiting room is packed. A clinical assistant calls out the names of patients, and they're escorted to examination rooms. This hospital alone screens around 2,000 patients a day — and tour guide Shawas Philip says this day is busier than usual.

"We might break that record today — of the number of patients that are seen on a particular day. That's exciting," he says.

Read more
Movie Interviews
4:49 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

In 'Hugo,' Scorsese Salutes A Movie Magician

For his new film, director Martin Scorsese worked to recreate the scenes of Brian Selznick's illustrated children's book, The Invention of Hugo Cabret.
Jaap Buitendijk GK Films

In his 2007 children's book, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, author Brian Selznick tells the story of an orphan named Hugo who lives in the walls of a Paris train station and spends his time winding the clocks.

Read more

Pages